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The following is of interest for those that fly - and those that don't.

 

These machines can be dangerous in the inexperienced hands of a pilot so if you see someone flying one in a dangerous manner - then report it.

 

For those of you walking or looking at some one flying a Quadcopter, always stay at least 150 feet away.

 

These aircraft can weigh the same as a bag of sugar or more and one of those dropping out of the sky from 60 feet or more and hitting you will mean a visit to the local hospital.

 

It has – and can happen, especially with inexperienced pilots.

 

Perhaps you might be thinking of buying a Radio Controlled Quadcopter.

You may have seen U-Tube video clips and thought, ‘I want to do that’, and everyone says how easy they are to fly because with GPS they are stable and safe.

Well, NO ACTUALLY.

The GREATEST mistake beginners make is assume that they can unpack an aircraft – charge the battery and then fly it before reading the instructions and learning about the aircraft characteristics. Trust me, that is the scenario for a crash situation.

Any type of radio controlled aircraft in beginners’ hands is likely to crash and cause damage to property or persons, so it is STRONGLY advised to have help in flying at the start - such as a flying club.

Consider this - if while you are having fun with your new aircraft – and you accidentally hit and cause damage to a person or to property, are you rich enough to pay for the medical expenses and any other damages that your ‘fun’ aircraft has caused? Can you meet all the necessary legal fees incurred? Or is it a case of “Oooops. Sorry your honour – I was not aware that insurance would be needed”. People have lost their homes and businesses to pay compensation to injured parties in the past which shows you how serious this can get, so don’t be stupid and fly it near people – not even the mother-in-law. Ignorance is NO defence.

The first thing to do before buying your aircraft is to get insurance e. g. (BFMA) British Flying Model Association (UK). Look at their web site :-

http://www. bmfa. org/

It costs £32 at the time of writing. The next thing to do is join a flying club to learn the ropes. Its more than likely there will be members only too glad to help out with advice.

Are you aware of CAA regulations? Here is a summary of UK CAA rulings :-

Provided the aircraft has a mass of 20 kg or less, the current regulations state:-

1. The operation must not endanger anyone or anything.

2. The aircraft must be kept within the visual line of sight (normally taken to be within 500 m horizontally and 400 ft vertically) of its remote pilot (i. e. the ‘person in charge’ of it). Operations beyond these distances must be approved by the CAA (the basic premise being for the operator to prove that he/she can do this safely).

 

3. Small unmanned aircraft (irrespective of their mass) that are being used for surveillance purposes are subject to tighter restrictions with regard to the minimum distances that you can fly near people or properties that are not under your control. If you wish to fly within these minima, permission is required from the CAA before operations are commenced.

4. CAA permission is also required for all flights that are being conducted for aerial work (i. e. in very simple terms, you are getting paid for doing it). Under current CAA rules it is not permissible to operate a Quadcopter for 'hire or reward' unless you are a commercial operator. If you want to take a video of your house and put it on U-tube, that’s fine, and if something happens near you that you think is newsworthy and you think it will be 'cool' to rush out and get some aerial shots to send to the BBC and expect payment. .. don't!

 

5. The 'remote pilot' has the responsibility for satisfying him/herself that the flight can be conducted safely.

Note: there is currently no 'protected' frequency band allocated for the control link between 'remote pilot' and aircraft. Some control frequencies are also 'shared' with other uses (such as Bluetooth and Wifi, or a band for research and development systems).

The small UAS manufacturers should be well aware of this, however it would be worthwhile checking with them to ensure that there are no other related precautions which need to be taken with their specific machine. You will need to ensure that any other equipment you routinely need to use does not adversely affect the flight of the aircraft.

Careful note should be taken that the collection of images of identifiable individuals, even inadvertently, when using surveillance cameras mounted on a small unmanned surveillance aircraft, will be subject to the Data Protection Act. As this Act contains requirements concerning the collection, storage and use of such images, Small Unmanned Aircraft operators should ensure that they are complying with any such applicable requirements or exemptions.

Further information about the Data Protection Act and the circumstances in which it applies can be obtained from the Information Commissioner’s Office and website: http://www. ico. org. uk

Have you had permission to take off and land from the landowner? “Oooops. Sorry your honour – I was not aware ……………”. Make sure you obtain permission before flying.

FINALLY :- While flying, THINK and ASSESS what you are going to do BEFORE you actually do it. If you are not sure – then don’t do it.

My last bit of advice, and perhaps the most important is :- It is possible to cause SEVERE injury by catching a Quadcopter while hovering. Look at the following to see what could happen :-

https://www. youtube. com/watch?v=SXqo8w_iU-c



Pete

 

Sep 14.

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One of the main reasons I have never taken up flying, you really need to be in a club to do it properly and safely. ..

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi

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Hi,

As a fixed wing flyer of some years who has now moved on to quads i, even now, i get things wrong, so what chance for someone who has seen one and ( on the spur of the moment ) bought it ? Son in law bought one at a big housing/furnishing exhibition in London ! What i would suggest is to buy a small one ( for indoor flying ) with a protective cage around the propellers and learn to fly it ---- in your front room ! true you will hit things but it is a lot safer than buying a 450 size ( thats mid size ) quad and at best loosing it !

david

Skoda Scout 4x4 pulling a coachman Amara 520/4 at 93%---- when full!

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I hope I have not put anyone off this hobby - it was my intention of warning everyone of the possible pitfalls to both spectators and pilots. It would be a pity for anyone to be put off from flying.

 

I for one would only be too happy to show and demonstrate these machines to anyone who is interested, and even let them have a flight on one of my quads. I am near Shrewsbury and if anyone wants to send me a PM to arrange this, I will only be too happy to oblige.

 

The end result can be very satisfying and here is an example :-

 

 

GP012aPS1_zps1a47770f.jpg

 

Mind you - that one shot took two days to take. Permission had to be obtained from Valley air traffic - the land owner and the Talyllyn Railway.

 

 

 

Here is another of a site - my question to you all, where is it?

 

 

Newbury6Jul144_zps0664a531.jpg

 

 

Pete

Edited by BOAC
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Hi,

As a fixed wing flyer of some years who has now moved on to quads i, even now, i get things wrong, so what chance for someone who has seen one and ( on the spur of the moment ) bought it ? Son in law bought one at a big housing/furnishing exhibition in London ! What i would suggest is to buy a small one ( for indoor flying ) with a protective cage around the propellers and learn to fly it ---- in your front room ! true you will hit things but it is a lot safer than buying a 450 size ( thats mid size ) quad and at best loosing it !

david

 

 

:goodpost:

 

Very wise advice - its a steep learning curve learning to fly properly and responsibly

 

Well said Sir,

 

Pete

Edited by BOAC
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I hope I have not put anyone off this hobby - it was my intention of warning everyone of the possible pitfalls to both spectators and pilots. It would be a pity for anyone to be put off from flying.

 

I for one would only be too happy to show and demonstrate these machines to anyone who is interested, and even let them have a flight on one of my quads. I am near Shrewsbury and if anyone wants to send me a PM to arrange this, I will only be too happy to oblige.

 

The end result can be very satisfying and here is an example :-

 

 

GP012aPS1_zps1a47770f.jpg

 

Mind you - that one shot took two days to take. Permission had to be obtained from Valley air traffic - the land owner and the Talyllyn Railway.

 

 

 

Here is another of a site - my question to you all, where is it?

 

 

Newbury6Jul144_zps0664a531.jpg

 

 

Pete

A flight on one of your quads ----- very satisfying--------------- i bet !! :D

Skoda Scout 4x4 pulling a coachman Amara 520/4 at 93%---- when full!

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A flight on one of your quads ----- very satisfying--------------- i bet !! :D

 

 

Oh - I forgot to mention the supplied parachute. .................................. :rolleyes:

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Does the CAA rules (Section 2) prohibit the use of 'virtual reality' headsets? Because if you are wearing one to see what the on-board camera is seeing then you can't see the aircraft so it is no longer line of sight?

Has the revolution finally begun?

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Does the CAA rules (Section 2) prohibit the use of 'virtual reality' headsets? Because if you are wearing one to see what the on-board camera is seeing then you can't see the aircraft so it is no longer line of sight?

 

No, FPV (First Person View) is allowed providing you have a spotter (A person who is able to see the aircraft)

 

The above is only a summary of the rules and for more information you will have to go onto the CAA website.

 

I might add that only idiots fly the aircraft away so far to lose sight of it. In that case it is VERY possible to be out of transmitter range and lose control.

 

Bye bye aircraft and £400 plus.

Edited by BOAC
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Let's not forget the knob that was trying to fly his "normal" 'copter at Hurley Riverside a few months ago amongst 12 'vans.

 

Once he'd worked out how it took off, it went about 10m in the air at 45 degrees and then nose dived into the ground - result :D:D

2019 Adria Adora Thames

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There are of course exceptions to this rule of yours!

 

 

Like 747's? :P

Let's not forget the knob that was trying to fly his "normal" 'copter at Hurley Riverside a few months ago amongst 12 'vans.

 

Once he'd worked out how it took off, it went about 10m in the air at 45 degrees and then nose dived into the ground - result :D:D

 

 

Way to go :huh:

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Oh - I forgot to mention the supplied parachute. .................................. :rolleyes:

Well i was thinking more of where the props might-er-touch if sitting on your quad--------------- :o

Skoda Scout 4x4 pulling a coachman Amara 520/4 at 93%---- when full!

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Negative, like Watchkeeper for example, google it.

Rarely flies in this country ;)

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi

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There are of course exceptions to this rule of yours!

 

 

First of all - its NOT a rule - Its common sense as my article was addressing model quadcopters specifically in case that had escaped your notice.

 

Don't bandy words with me Sir. I have a fearsome Mother In Law. Be afraid - very afraid. :D

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First of all - its NOT a rule - Its common sense as my article was addressing model quadcopters specifically in case that had escaped your notice.

 

Don't bandy words with me Sir. I have a fearsome Mother In Law. Be afraid - very afraid. :D

 

I humbly apologise for bringing this point incorrectly to your attention.

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I humbly apologise for bringing this point incorrectly to your attention.

 

 

Thank you - but if you have a Watchkeeper or two stashed away can I nip over and have a go please.

 

I shall even buy you a fry up for the privilege.

Well i was thinking more of where the props might-er-touch if sitting on your quad--------------- :o

 

 

Volunteers will be paid the handsome sum of £4. 50. Tea cakes and a cup of tea supplied.

 

WHO could refuse an offer like THAT.

 

Not even the MOD can stretch to an offer like that. They are too skint spending £850,000,000 per shot on the Watchkeepers.

 

Theoretically 1220 should be the first in line here so don't all rush at once.

 

Hey David - its about time you glued wings on a bus !!!!! :lol:

 

 

 

 

 

Edited for the hell of it

Edited by BOAC
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About 5 years ago I was contacted by a recruitment specialist looking for pilots on behalf of the MOD and Thales. There was a formal interview followed by a flying assessment, a simulator session at Farnborough and then actually flying a half sized and then a full sized Watchkeeper. Unfortunately I wasn't one of the ones selected, I was put on a reserved list and then funding was cut.

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Raytheon Systems are currently looking for a test pilot. ... :)

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi

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Thank you - but if you have a Watchkeeper or two stashed away can I nip over and have a go please.

 

I shall even buy you a fry up for the privilege.

 

 

Volunteers will be paid the handsome sum of £4. 50. Tea cakes and a cup of tea supplied.

 

WHO could refuse an offer like THAT.

 

Not even the MOD can stretch to an offer like that. They are too skint spending £850,000,000 per shot on the Watchkeepers.

 

Theoretically 1220 should be the first in line here so don't all rush at once.

 

Hey David - its about time you glued wings on a bus !!!!! :lol:

 

Well it is red, but it had no blue lights on the roof ! as for wings-- ever hit a big pot hole with one ?

 

 

 

Edited for the hell of it

Skoda Scout 4x4 pulling a coachman Amara 520/4 at 93%---- when full!

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Not even the MOD can stretch to an offer like that. They are too skint spending £850,000,000 per shot on the Watchkeepers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited for the hell of it

Actually that is for everything, 54 aircraft, infrastructure, training, ground support vehicles etc. The aircraft are only about £14 millions each!

Has the revolution finally begun?

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