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Determining Kerbweight Of A Vehicle


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If I need to confirm the exact kerbweight of a vehicle, is there an easy way based on the plate normally near the driver's door?

 

I'm sure I remember reading somewhere you could subtract 1 number from another and get the kerbweight of a vehicle, but I can't find the reference to it online.

 

I'm also interested to know whether this method provides the exact figure for the car (ie allowing for the extra weighty items added to the car (my car manual states things like climate control adds weight to the kerbweight figure) or whether these plates are worse than useless?

 

I'm well aware of online websites for given me a figure for each engine within the model ranges, but I'm interested to know if the plate gives the exact value for *that* car. ...

 

Thanks

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The only way to find out the weight is to go to a weigh bridge and weigh it.

 

Manufacturers figures are only for basic models and that's what the web sites generally repeat. The real weight can be considerably different.

 

So, empty all the junk out, fill the tank to the required level, someone will tell us how much as I forget. Use the European definition not the UK one.

 

It won't cost you much, I got mine done for free at a council site.

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The definition of kerb weight is not an exact science and there are various interpretations to be found. The EU directive is as follows:

 

 

European Directive 95/48/EC which specifies the kerb weight as a car in ready to drive condition with the fuel tank 90% full, a driver on board weighing 68 kg and luggage of 7 kg.

 

See NTTA

 

http://www. ntta. co. uk/faq/default. htm

 

Brian

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Hi Brian,

I have always considered the advice given on the NTTA site to make good sense and follow the law. However section 2 of the page that you have indicated in the above post does not make sense. It states that anything loaded into the car including passengers reduces the vehicles towing limit. Surely the manufacturers towing limit is the same value at kerbweight as at max gross weight. Here are the figures for my Passat.

A: Kerbweight 1565kgs

B: Manufactures towing limit 1600kgs

C: VIN plate max gross weight 1970kgs

D: VIN plate max train weight 3570kgs

 

Therefore C - A = 405kgs (max load in the vehicle)

and D - C = 1600kgs (trailer weight at vehicle max gross weight)

 

According to the above the manufacturer has not reduced the towing limit for the fully loaded vehicle.

If the NTTA is correct we all have problem! :unsure::blink:

 

Frank

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Frank,

 

What you say is perfectly logical. I could not understand the logic of the NTTA.

 

Out of interest, I just checked my cars figures (Volvo S60 D5) - they seem to tie up with yours.

 

A: Kerbweight 1515kgs (Not given in handbook, based on "cuddles" figure)

B: Manufactures towing limit 1600kgs

C: VIN plate max gross weight 2030kgs

D: VIN plate max train weight 3630kgs

 

Therefore C - A = 515kgs (max load in the vehicle)

and D - C = 1600kgs (trailer weight at vehicle max gross weight)

 

It would seem almost impossible to exceed the max train weight so I consider I am OK.

 

Brian

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Thanks for the comments everyone. I'm happy with the kerbweight of my current car, but am looking to upgrade to a heavier car later in the year to allow a move to a heavier caravan in a few years time - hence I was hoping there was some magical way of checking the kerbweight of a car before I buy it - I think asking to drive it to the local council weighbridge might not be welcome by the salesman! :)

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Swing

 

Use What Car web site as their car specifications show the kerb weight.

 

http://www. whatcar. co. uk/

 

You could take it up to the weighbridge before purchase if you want. The saleman should have no objection as especially as you will surely have a good test drive before purchase.

 

I will not buy a car without having it for at least an hour and, if it is a new car, I normally take it for a day (that's what demos are supplied for, they are not the saleman's personal item). If the salesman doesn't like it then take your custom elsewhere.

 

Roger

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