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Gazj

Towcar Tyre Pressures

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Hello

 

We brought our first caravan in Sept 2013, before I hitch our car to the caravan I would increase the tyre pressures as per the heavier load.

 

Is this correct way, or would you hitch the caravan then increase tyre pressures.

 

Appreciate any advice given.

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either way, doesn't matter

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Thanks for the reply, the reason that I asked was that when we get to our destination and adjusting the pressure, I am quite surprise how much they drop.

 

My tow car is a Mondeo 2. 0 TDCI, and I noticed then when I am just using the car for normal use I had to constantly top up the pressure quite regular, I was told by a tyre dealer it was quite common problem with Fords so I was advised to have the tyres glued sealed rather than use washing up liquid when having tyres fitted.

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rem don't know about that. ......sounds like a slow puncture to me

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I simply follow what the car maker has printed in the hand book for rear tyre pressures when towing; it states to set it to the pressure value as for the Maximum Gross Vehicle Weight.

To me an engineer that worked with the design of dynamic stability systems this is a sound concept in that it makes the tyres as resistant to sideways deflection as possible, highly desirable in stopping snaking. I don't believe the extra axle loading from carrying the noseweight is here a particularly relevant point, though must be adequate, certainly getting the highest lateral stiffness is far more important.

Edited by JTQ

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If the tyre fitters have checked the tyres and the valves are ok then it could be porous casting on the wheels if they are alloys. It's not common problem but I've seen a few times.

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Yes I would say i's down to your alloy if the tyres and valves check out, I had this on my old MG ZT and it was only after I had the wheels fully powder coated did they leaking stop.

 

My wife's old Focus also had a slow puncture, but after fitting new tyres it still happened, the alloys didn't need a refurbish so we just pumped it up every week.

 

However if my tow car suffered with this and it lost pressure during a journey I'd be getting the wheel full refurbish pronto. ... and I don't just mean the front face tidy, I mean proper tyre off full powder coat job.

 

PX Wheels in Blackpool do a great job and will supply exchange wheels via post to get swapped at a local garage, it's about £75 a corner.

Edited by Jonny5H

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My cars handbook does not recommend a 'towing' pressure but just has normal load and maximum load pressures. As the difference between the norm and max is around 400kgs and the noseweight of my van is around 85kgs I dont put the max load pressure in. Normal pressure is 33. 5psi while max load pressure is 41psi so I leave the rear tyres set to 36psi all the time and this works well for me. The outfit is very stable in all weather conditions.

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My cars handbook does not recommend a 'towing' pressure but just has normal load and maximum load pressures. As the difference between the norm and max is around 400kgs and the noseweight of my van is around 85kgs I dont put the max load pressure in. Normal pressure is 33. 5psi while max load pressure is 41psi so I leave the rear tyres set to 36psi all the time and this works well for me. The outfit is very stable in all weather conditions.

As I have 3 kids and associated luggage, 75kg roofbox and a bike on he roof I inflate to max pressure and go very slowly over speed bumps :lol:

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Always adjust tyre pressures when tyres are cold, as the pressure increases when tyres get hot.

We used to have a Volvo on alloy wheels and had this constant reduction in pressure. Tried everything, even fitting tyres using thick rubber grease, but to no avail.

We were due to set off on holiday with the van and didn't want tyre problems, so in the hinder end we fitted "Tubeless tubes" on the rear(offending) axle. No problems since then.

Don't know if they still make / sell "Tubeless Tubes" though.

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Always adjust tyre pressures when tyres are cold, as the pressure increases when tyres get hot.

We used to have a Volvo on alloy wheels and had this constant reduction in pressure. Tried everything, even fitting tyres using thick rubber grease, but to no avail.

We were due to set off on holiday with the van and didn't want tyre problems, so in the hinder end we fitted "Tubeless tubes" on the rear(offending) axle. No problems since then.

Don't know if they still make / sell "Tubeless Tubes" though.

We had the same problems on a volvo estate. .. The issue was slightly damaged rims so the tyres could not make a perfect seal. The tyre company did not want to point this out though as they had damaged them fitting the tyres. Using tubeless tubes created more problems though as they effectively invalidated your insurance as they are a none approved modification and not approved by the tyre manufacturer.

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As I have 3 kids and associated luggage, 75kg roofbox and a bike on he roof I inflate to max pressure and go very slowly over speed bumps :lol:

But the economy when not towing is great! Agree with you though ref speed bumps. ...

And wet weather hooning is deffo off the cards!

Edited by milkymarsh

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Dreadly 11. Who says it's not approved by tyre manufacturers??? They are tubes specifically made for tubeless tyres.

What other economical solutions can you suggest??

The problem, as with all things alloy on vehicles, is that over time a chemical reaction is set up which in the case of tyres causes a slight distortion of the wheel or the adhesion of particles of tyre beading to the mating surface of the rim.

For some reason, even thorough cleaning of the rim still does not give a 100% seal.

Our longest period of maintaining tyre pressure was when we fitted the tyres with rubber grease. All the correct tyre fitting sealants did not work.

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Dreadly 11. Who says it's not approved by tyre manufacturers??? They are tubes specifically made for tubeless tyres.

What other economical solutions can you suggest??

The problem, as with all things alloy on vehicles, is that over time a chemical reaction is set up which in the case of tyres causes a slight distortion of the wheel or the adhesion of particles of tyre beading to the mating surface of the rim.

For some reason, even thorough cleaning of the rim still does not give a 100% seal.

Our longest period of maintaining tyre pressure was when we fitted the tyres with rubber grease. All the correct tyre fitting sealants did not work.

All I am saying is that if a tyre is specified as 'tubeless' then that means it was designed and tested and type approved to work without a tube. There is every possibility that in the event of an accident resulting from a blow-out a tyre manufacturer could very perceivably blame the tube or the presence of the tube, therefore your insurance may not be valid.

I'm no expert in these areas but it would make sense to me that this could be the case.

 

I have E-mailed Michelin to ask them what their opinion of these tubes are? Be interesting to find out.

Edited by dreadly

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It will INDEED be interesting to read Michelin's reply. I had dealings with this company for many years and I can almost tell you now what their reply will be.

Please note that I said I don't know if these tubes are still for sale---Volvo 240-----certainly not yesterday!

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I would do the tyre pressure before hitching the caravan. I have no expert knowledge but I would say it does matter if you do it with the caravan attached.

 

macafee2

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I would do the tyre pressure before hitching the caravan. I have no expert knowledge but I would say it does matter if you do it with the caravan attached.

 

macafee2

I can't see how it would matter as the pressure in the tyre does not alter with weight on it unless the extra weight forces air out of the tyre. This would happen whether you put the correct pressure in with the van on the back or when you put the van on later

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It will INDEED be interesting to read Michelin's reply. I had dealings with this company for many years and I can almost tell you now what their reply will be.

Please note that I said I don't know if these tubes are still for sale---Volvo 240-----certainly not yesterday!

It appears that Michelin did a very good job of evading the question. .. Respect to them for a fantasically fast answer though. This was their answer :-

 

Unfortunately we cannot offer tubes for your car tyres, it looks as though you will have to replace your wheels.

 

Should you require any further assistance please contact us on 0845 366 1590 (UK & NI) or 0044 (0) 1782 401590 (ROI), quoting the reference number above.

 

Kind Regards

Julie

Consumer Contact Team

Edited by dreadly

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If you've checked the valves and the tyre are fine just get the alloys fully refurbished to seal them, if fixed it for me on my old car. This Saturday I had to visit my caravan dealer, which is a 120 mile round trip. This time prior to setting off I put the pressures up to fully ladened all round on the car and it felt more planted on the road. It was only myself this time in the car, not the four of us either, but still much better. ..which is saying something as the ST tyres don't have much sidewall deflection at normal running pressures due to the low profile of them.

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