Jump to content

Which Slide And Negative Scanner


alison01326
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've had a look at the various threads, and although one starts off well with the pros and cons of scanning slides and negatives (ie life might be too short), and moves on to photo editing followed by who had what as their first camera (my first non point and shoot was a three ton Zenith!).

 

I wonder if anyone can actually recommend a slide and negative scanner?

 

My late Mum's photos are all on slides and date back to the early 60s and I need to get them digitised before they deteriorate (some have, but many are OK and, I have to confess, will be Photoshopped to try and bring a bit more colour back into them). There are only about 3500 of them (!) so at 30 a day it will take me a little over three months, before I start on my 2000 and then do all of the family's negatives. It's going to be a long haul but a lot of our prints are yellowing now and I hope the negatives produce better results than photoshopped scanned prints.

 

I'd better not mention that I'm also scanning photos from as far back as 1916 to try and bring them back to life!!!

 

Back to the point. I bought a scanner about 10 years ago, but it only did one slide at a time (or five negatives) and whilst the results were acceptable, they could have been better. I'm tempted by the one which pops up in Lidl/Aldi from time to time, but don't mind paying more if the results are better.

Any suggestions?

The traveller sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see (GK Chesterton)

 

There's no such thing as bad weather, only the wrong equipment (Alfred Wainwright)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I looked into this a while ago and you have

to spend a lot of money to get a good one.

I made one using a 35mm lens reversed

on my standard dslr lens, a piece of opal

perspex and a flash gun.

The results are far superior to the cheaper

mini scanners, try a google.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought one from Marks and Spencer a few years ago and, in fact, I was using it today to do some slides and negatives for them.

They don't sell them any more but this http://www. amazon. co. uk/SLIDES-NEGATIVES-SCANNER-CAMERA-OPTION/dp/B00C1GEMHI/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1390939350&sr=8-15&keywords=slide+scanners

looks very much like it.

I have done all ours over the last couple of years and it is worth the effort before they all deteriorate too badly to do. You have to make sure you get them the right way round but you can revolve them. Worth spending the money.

Edited by Jslocks

Sadly no van anymore but 35 years was a good run

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought one from Amazon recently its a Xennox cost under £50 and does a brilliant job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would seriously consider having them professionally done with pro equipment. The cheapo £50 specials won't be a patch on pro gear and it's only a one off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use an Epson Perfection V200 and find it does a great job. Bought direct from Epson.

Used for documents, photograph copies and four slides at a time.

It will copy three or four colour photographs and produce separate images for each one.

It also has various actions available like copy and email but I prefer to do that my own way.

Ford C-Max and Coachman Festival 380/2 SE 2006    Motto  Carpe Diem

Still trying to find the perfect pitch. ..110 amp Battery+ 65 watt roof mounted Solar and 25 watt Wind Turbine. LED lighting. Status Aerial 315. Loose chattels marked with UV,. Safefill Gas Fitted.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Epson Perfection V700 Photo is a quality product and comes with SilverFast as well as Epson software. Easily handles photos, negatives and slides. Not cheap but worth the cost for large scanning projects.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alison

Real problem here! Unless you know the standards of the people posting replies, you don't know whether their 'good' is the same as your 'good'. Not trying to be negative (pun intended) but I have spent hours scanning (Epson V700) and still re-visit certain photos to have another go. What standard are you after?

Sam :beardy:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for all your replies. I don't have a DSLR camera, or a flash gun and the thing with the opal perspex sounds quite a faff and I'd probably lose interest setting it up and putting it all away again as this is a job I reckon will probably take me a year with some weeks when I have time to get a couple of hundred done, other weeks just a few, and other weeks none at all . .... and of course sometimes I will be away in the caravan. A slide scanner would certainly be more practical. The suggestion from jslocks looks just the thing, and if the reviews are anything to go by it would probably do the job fine.

 

I already have an ordinary flat bed scanner which I scan photos on (I also have a sheet fed scanner which I can use for the more robust photos, ie the more recent ones) both of which work a treat so I'm OK with scanning actual photos.

 

I've just had a look at one online company's prices for getting the scanning done professionally and at 35p per slide or negative at standard quality I'd be looking at £1,750 for 5000 images, and that's just the 50 years' worth of slides, never mind all the negatives which I want to do. If I could find someone to do it locally (as I don't want to send anything anywhere) I imagine it would be more expensive again. I could get a relatively scanner (eg Epson V700) for considerably less than that.

 

SamD, good question. Most of the scanned photos will live on the computer, and will never be printed so as long as they are clear, a high quality image that could possibly be enlarged is not really necessary. All I really want is a faithful digital reproduction of the original of what are basically family photographs of events, places and people so that when the originals finally lose their colour, or quality or get damaged in any way there is something that will, hopefully last for ever (although in 100 years time who knows what will have replaced computers and digitalised photographs). Some of the slides such as the ones my Mum took in California when she was on a teaching exchange in 1963, particularly those of the Pasadena Flower Parade, and my Uncle's photos of his time in northern Nigeria and Jordan, and my Dad's photos of the SS Uganda in the Norwegian fjords in 1968 have a particular quality of light and colour that would probably better be dealt with by a professional but otherwise a straight copy, quality-wise, of the original will be fine.

 

Tomorrow, I am taking the laptop over to my Dad's, along with the flatbed scanner, to copy the photos he took when he was in the Navy during the Second World War. I'm sure he shouldn't have taken some of the photos but somehow he got away with it and both he, the camera, and the film / photos survived!!!! We were going through them at the weekend, and there's even a photo of him in Boston (Mass) carrying a newly purchased photograph album which is the album in which they now reside!!!!!

The traveller sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see (GK Chesterton)

 

There's no such thing as bad weather, only the wrong equipment (Alfred Wainwright)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is a valid argument which says capture them quick and easy and then choose the ones (on a pc) to capture 'properly' but going from your 4th and 5th paras above seems as though you have a treasure trove of old photos.

Whichever way you go, make sure you have a plan for metadata and file structure - nothing worse than scanning thousands and not able to find any! Many people have 2 slide/negative trays so that you can be inputting keywords/location details etc whilst another set is being scanned.

Sam :beardy:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks SamD. At the moment everything goes into a folder by year then into Photoshop where they are catalogued by photographer and keywords, captions and notes are added. Fortunately all of mum's slides have notes on the cardboard border and about 80% of loose photos have notes on the back. Unfortunately the oldest ones have been glued in and my great aunt wrote witty captions. There is no one alive now to identify the people in the photos of the maternal side of the family which is a pity although I recognise my grandparents and great aunts.

 

My biggest worry is that when I eventually shuffle off this mortal coil will anyone be as interested as I am in these photos.

Edited by alison01326

The traveller sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see (GK Chesterton)

 

There's no such thing as bad weather, only the wrong equipment (Alfred Wainwright)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a Canon MP980 mutifunction device which scan 4 slides or a negative strip at a time quite satisfactorily albeit not very speedily . .. my first camera was a Zenit B SLR. I'm pleased with the results and most need very minor tweaks (unless damaged or dirty, or poorly exposed in the first place).

 

I scan them as tif files at max resolution to avoid lossy compression - only applying that saving the edited stuff as jpg. Memory (hard disk space) is cheap. The key is file naming / sorting / metadata entry. ..

 

While some here are keen photo people, you'd be wise to read expert reviews online as well.

 

I thought this was deja vu http://www. caravantalk. co. uk/community/topic/77754-help-required/?hl=%2Bslide+%2Bscanner&do=findComment&comment=819903

2012 Bailey Pegasus 2 Rimini towed by 2019 Ford Galaxy Titanium X, 2.0 EcoBlue, 8 speed auto.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

You're quite right, that was the topic which I referred to in my first post. I was specifically seeking people's experiences / recommendations of slide & negative scanners and that post didn't really give me enough food for thought. I thought I'd try again. I now have a few ideas to take my research forward and am grateful to those who have given me some names/models of such scanners.

The traveller sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see (GK Chesterton)

 

There's no such thing as bad weather, only the wrong equipment (Alfred Wainwright)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...