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Ian 01
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Im thinking of changing the 7n&7s to the 13 pin plug as my car has a 13 pin(ive been using an adapter),what I was thinking of doing is cutting the 7n/7s cables inside the van just before the fuse's and connecting the new 13 core cable to them. what I would like some advice on is which is the best way to connect them,should I use Block connectors or the crimp type,i know you can get a 13pin plug that you can fit both 7n&7s cables into but because my van is a 97 it only has 1 earth return,from 98 they now have 2 so I would have to put another relay in on the charge side of it to make it compatable so whilst I have to do some wiring a thought a would go the whole hog and change the lot,any help would be appreciated.

 

Ian

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Hi Ian and :welcome:

 

I always use heat shrink connectors for anything electrical. It prevents water ingress and corrosion.

 

H.

Finding things funny since 1968 :blink:

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Use a ratchet crimp tool to ensure a decent connection

2018 S-Max Titanium 2. 0 Tdci (177. 54bhp,180ps,132kw) Powershift + 2015 Unicorn III Cadz, Ventura Marlin porch awning

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I agree - crimp rather than screw terminals.

Graham

Unless otherwise stated all posts are my personal opinion 

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An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi

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I was surprised to see my car electrician remove a section of the plastic coating, and tightly wind the connecting cable around it so its like a T shape. He then said that was the best way to join this type of cable. He then used insulating tape the rubber one!

so I would suggest that this is a good way no connectors needed, I would add that if I needed to do this I would also solder them.

You then have permanent trouble free connections.

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I was surprised to see my car electrician remove a section of the plastic coating, and tightly wind the connecting cable around it so its like a T shape. He then said that was the best way to join this type of cable. He then used insulating tape the rubber one!

so I would suggest that this is a good way no connectors needed, I would add that if I needed to do this I would also solder them.

You then have permanent trouble free connections.

This method is only any good if you use solder. Just taping them like that is insufficient in my opinion.

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi

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You will find that in fact crimped connections are more reliable than soldered connection. The solder wicks up the copper wire and over time the copper becomes brittle at that point due to work hardening with vibration and movement etc, it the fractures.

 

The rubber tape discussed is self amalgamating tape and it's really good, you can even use it for temporary repairs of water leaks etc.

 

Ap

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I would just use a 13 pin plug that as the two entry hole's in the back for the 7n&7s cables would save cutting and joining cables.

LUNAR LEXON DS ROYAL HERCULES MOVER, 2017 Seat Alhambra 184 se lux & SSANGYONG REXTON 2. 9 RUNNING ON VEG OIL. 1982 HONDA CX500EC. YAMAHA XJ600S. 2006 FORD KA

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Ian i would solder and heat shrink tis the best and very neat if done well if you need a hand pm me as I am on the Wirral too and an auto spark doing just this sort of thing or email is ok too clubsecure@aol. com

steve

Same here,, definitely solder then maybe glue lined heat shrink,, if it is good enough for car manufacturers to do certain joints this way it is good enough for me

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Same here,, definitely solder then maybe glue lined heat shrink,, if it is good enough for car manufacturers to do certain joints this way it is good enough for me

Mai I suggest that you google crimp v solder joints before recommending how to do a job.

 

Ap

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Crimp is for me too, after 20 years of wiring trucks and trailers and never getting a boomerang it is time tested.

 

H.

Finding things funny since 1968 :blink:

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Why not run the new wires into the fuse box instead of joining wire to wire?

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Mai I suggest that you google crimp v solder joints before recommending how to do a job.

Ap

https://www. highpowermedia. com/ret-monitor/3199/solder-or-crimp

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi

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Mai I suggest that you google crimp v solder joints before recommending how to do a job.

 

Ap

 

Edited

 

As no point in replying to certain members

Edited by Mike&deb
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Edited

 

As no point in replying to certain members

I'm always stager red when people that give out incorrect advice are so reluctant to learn when offered help, so I do agree with your comment and I wish I hadn't bothered.

 

Ap

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I'd investigate how the existing wires are connected to the fuse panel currently before planning much further. ..

 

You may find they have crimped push on spade terminals?

You may find the wires are soldered?

You may find some other 'quick fit' terminal block or simple screw terminals?

 

Once you know that you may be best having a continuous wiring solution to the existing panel replicating the original connection method rather than a 'cut and splice' type solution?

 

If access to those connections is highly difficult / impossible, then any solution that suits you will work - from screw terminals to inline crimps etc. ,, as has been suggested already. Don't get too hung up on which you choose. .. as you will have done the job it will be easy to maintain / fix any future problems if and when they occur ;)

2012 Bailey Pegasus 2 Rimini towed by 2019 Ford Galaxy Titanium X, 2.0 EcoBlue, 8 speed auto.

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Personally, I'd re-wire from a new 13-pin plug to the PDU. You could tape some wire to the old cable and pull it through, then pull the new 13-core cable through with the wire. As I understand it, the post-98 wirring you'll need a relay and they'd be no better place to install in than in the PDU. If a job's worth doing. ..

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