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I Was Told "you Are Mad!"


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Today, several people told me "you're mad!"

 

What have I done to deserve this? Well, after my last (very) rough crossing to Dublin in December, I was back at Holyhead for some more high speed action on the fast craft. The forecast was rough, the screens at Holyhead stated rough, and the sales desk staff said it would be rough. Despite sailing with Irish Ferries, the "Stena Line girls" recognised me from the last trip with Stena when I was "only booking because it was rough". I was told I was the only person who was not green when disembarking! I bought the ticket, not bad at £33 and boarded the "Jonathan Swift". The crew on here (well some of them) remembered me from a few months ago on another rough crossing and when I said I only come along when it is rough, I was told "you must be mad".

 

I do feel for those who struggle in these sea conditions, and a good number of those on board did. Whilst they get off at the other end, I get off and get straight back on again for another two hours of fun.

 

Only two of us braved the outer deck on the outward crossing, and I was absolutely drenched in rain and sea spray.

 

I am not sure why I have this hobby, but riding rough seas on ferries and "vomit comets" just has to be done.

 

I'm trying to get a "cheeky fare" for the Stena Europe from Fishguard in the next day or two.

 

Russell

 

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Online blog and travels, although sometimes there is a lack of travel due to work!

 

It's an uncharted sea, it's an unopened door but you've got to reach out and you've got to explore.

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I'm so glad I'm not the only one who has said "You are mad". I can, somehow, understand the urge for the adrenalin rush - if I thought I wouldn't be sick I'd be the first to join you!

 

We've had a couple of rough crossings in our time - trying to calm a baby and toddler when hubby has disappeared up on deck (feeling ill) and feeling ill yourself is no fun, though. Our worst crossing, though, was on the Scilly Isles ferry from Penzance. I have since learned that the boat "Scillonian" is affectionately known as the "stomach pump" - it certainly was! It was so bad that we caught the helicopter back and with 2 adults and 2 kids it was not cheap! The crew tried to tell us the return journey is fine as you're going with the flow of the Atlantic, but I wasn't prepared to take the risk.

 

Enjoy your bumpy rides!

 

Glen.

2019 Ford Kuga 2. 0 (150 bhp) AWD Manual and 2022 Coachman Acadia GTS 565.

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Did a crossing from Plymouth to Santander many years ago. Boat fully booked only four of us in the restaurant enjoying copious amounts of alcohol and steak and chips. Everybody else on the ferry were sick or comatose! Breakfast was good as well!.

 

I love rough crossings!

2019 Bailey Platinum (640) Phoenix from Chipping Sodbury caravans, towed by our  2017 my Discovery Sport!

 

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Russell We know "you are mad" . . But hey someone has to be :) You just keep getting your thrills in your own unique way

 

And remember to come and tell us about them :)

Edited by Rita
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My late father in law and I love the sea, one ferry crossings we had the dining room to ourselves,

we think the ferry had an ex-destroyer captain and it was running late into bad weather.

It was also the ferrys last voyage being one of the narrower vessels with ramps to mezzanine parking

(Viking Voyager?)

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Today's crazy antics were a trip along the Cambrian Coast, but due to the railway line being close after severe flooding, it was a coach, over the tops, through the valleys, it was grand, apart from trying to drink coffee and red wine going round bends!

 

Russell

Online blog and travels, although sometimes there is a lack of travel due to work!

 

It's an uncharted sea, it's an unopened door but you've got to reach out and you've got to explore.

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No doubt you are getting the excellent discounts from Stena et all??..........persistent they are!

 

geoff

Kia Sorento KX-1 CRDI 4WD towing an Elddis Affinity 530

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Had a couple of "good" crossings from Stranrea to Belfast. On one the HSS hit a wave that just about stopped her dead everything on board moved with the inertia great fun watching folks start to get that look in their eyes. ....

Best place on deck is above the engines you can see the jets just about. ...brilliant.

I have no problems with a little swell ;)

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We were lucky enough to be in Cairns, Australia a few years ago and could not miss the opportunity to see the wonderful Great Barrier Reef. We boarded the catamaran with an enormous number of Japanese tourists. As the boat left Cairns, a real hooley started to be whipped up, and the vessel was soon ploughing up and down huge rollers. I looked around after a bit, and realised that the entire seating area was now deserted apart from me and my wife. All the Japanese were greenly leaning over the side. We had a brilliant view and trip. I remember a couple of crew members coming down to check we were OK as they couldn't believe any of the passengers were not throwing up!

Enjoy every minute of every day. It doesn't last nearly as long as you'd like, and there's no guarantee of coming this way again.

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I'm so glad I'm not the only one who has said "You are mad". I can, somehow, understand the urge for the adrenalin rush - if I thought I wouldn't be sick I'd be the first to join you!

 

We've had a couple of rough crossings in our time - trying to calm a baby and toddler when hubby has disappeared up on deck (feeling ill) and feeling ill yourself is no fun, though. Our worst crossing, though, was on the Scilly Isles ferry from Penzance. I have since learned that the boat "Scillonian" is affectionately known as the "stomach pump" - it certainly was! It was so bad that we caught the helicopter back and with 2 adults and 2 kids it was not cheap! The crew tried to tell us the return journey is fine as you're going with the flow of the Atlantic, but I wasn't prepared to take the risk.

 

Enjoy your bumpy rides!

 

Glen.

 

They do fantastic cooked breakfasts on the Scillonian!!

 

You must have had a rough time of it to shell out for the helicopters. I've been on the Scillonian many times and have to say that I'm always surprised just how many people suffer (most of them!!). The main reason it's so uncomfortable is that the vessel is pretty much flat bottomed to cope with the low tides in St Mary's Harbour. The average ocean going vessel does not, of course, have a flat bottom.

 

No helicopters now though as an alternative - just the planes

 

I too quite enjoy on rough crossings, and I've had a few from Plymouth to Roscoff in October/November before now on twinning visits and the like. I prefer it if I'm allowed out on deck . .... can't be doing with being locked in when the ship is knee deep in sawdust and vomit but needs must, I suppose, when the occasional wave comes up and slightly over the lower decks. The only time I've felt a bit off was on the vomit comet from Poole to Jersey when a couple of engines failed and we were going slowly. I'm still not sure that that was seasickness, just the stress of being made to sit in our seats with the seatbelts done up and having to put our hands up to go to the loo so that a member of staff could accompany us on the stairs as the boat was rocking and rolling quite dramatically. That and the stress of an eighteen month old fidget who was desperate to get off my lap and go exploring. He was sick on my husband probably through frustration and tears rather than seasickness as he's never had any problems with rough crossings since.

 

My Dad has just come back from a cruise - he should have gone to the Caribbean but due to a technical problem they ended up in the Mediterranean instead, but that's by the by. On the return leg, they had to wait in Lisbon from Friday 3rd January to Tuesday 7th January (the day he was due home) due to 40 foot waves in the Bay of Biscay. He got back a week late. He was saying, however, that the first leg of the trip from Southampton to Tenerife was the roughest he has ever encountered. This coming from a man who was on a little minesweeper in the North Sea for part of the Second World War.

 

On a lighter not, unused chunder bags make great sandwich bags ;)

The traveller sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see (GK Chesterton)

 

There's no such thing as bad weather, only the wrong equipment (Alfred Wainwright)

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No doubt you are getting the excellent discounts from Stena et all??..........persistent they are!

 

geoff

 

Stena do seem keen on marketing - got a 25% discount thing sent through, but my week off in February is Dover based, all at 50p each way of course. That said, they make a packet out of me in anciliary revenue at Dover, £13 for the brasserie breakfast, and a load of wine that is usually £12 ish for six bottles. Last lot was Blossom Hill, although I think it was £14.

 

Russell

Online blog and travels, although sometimes there is a lack of travel due to work!

 

It's an uncharted sea, it's an unopened door but you've got to reach out and you've got to explore.

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Hi Russell,

 

You could get the same thrills free, & meet like minded people if you enroll as a crew member in the RNLI.

 

I await feedback after your first trip.

 

David

Swizz

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If I lived near the coast it is something I'd consider! I also want to go out on a trawler but not sure how to sort that out. The other thing is passage on freight ships to etc. Anything that floats really!

 

Russell

Online blog and travels, although sometimes there is a lack of travel due to work!

 

It's an uncharted sea, it's an unopened door but you've got to reach out and you've got to explore.

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If I lived near the coast it is something I'd consider! I also want to go out on a trawler but not sure how to sort that out. The other thing is passage on freight ships to etc. Anything that floats really!

 

Russell

 

My late Uncle was a great one for travelling on cargo vessels. He made a couple of journeys from Australia on one. He had lived there for 22 years and was fed up with flying back and forth so did one way by ship when he first retired, but was called back to work, so he made his final return trip to the UK (with furniture) as one of five passengers on a container ship.

 

Shortly before his unexpected death. he and I had planned a trip to South America. He used these people http://www. cargoshipvoyages. com/

The traveller sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see (GK Chesterton)

 

There's no such thing as bad weather, only the wrong equipment (Alfred Wainwright)

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  • 1 year later...

Try 3 days on a 40ft yacht in mid atlantic in a force 9 Kid. That should satisfy your urges.

It satisfied mine. :lol::lol:

van Bessacar 625 towed by Mercedes M class 3. 2 cdi.

we do 6mths at home (winter) 6mths touring (summer)

Retired & loving it.--------- :D Adventure before Dementia. :P

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Wait until you hit a Force 10 coming out of the Falkland Sound on the RMS St Helena. No stabelizers, screws coming out of the water, whole ship sea sick. . I was in ma bunk with my May West on close to tears absolutely terrified. . It lasted two day's and made practicly no head way what so ever. . " Aye pull up a sand bag ", as they say. ..

 

GAS . .... :mellow:

Edited by Grumpy Auld Smeesh

"to be auld and wise you must first be young and daft "

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I lived in Cape Town and a trip out to Robben island about 7 miles can be quite an experience in the winter. No wonder there are about 500 wrecks in Table Bay. Love rough seas as one moment you can see for miles around and the next only a wall of sea water as the boat dips into the trough. You are too busy keeping your balance in a small boat to worry about being sea sick. :D

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If I lived near the coast it is something I'd consider! I also want to go out on a trawler but not sure how to sort that out. The other thing is passage on freight ships to etc. Anything that floats really!

 

Russell

 

I too enjoyed the Stena Cat from Stranrae to Larne, the thrill of standing against the stern rail watching the wake from the jets.

 

It also reminded me of my youth when we used to go wreck fishing for Conga Eels out of Whitby on a smallish fishing boat, open gunnels the lot.

 

Once we were under way and we were ploughing our way up towards Hartleypool, I would get out my breafast to the dismay of the others on board.

 

Breakfast consisted of a large vaccum flask containing 2 fried eggs, 2 rashers of bacon, 2 links of sausage and a pile of tomatoes and mushrooms poured out into a metal dish (the bread was packed seperately), all cooked at 3am prior to meeting the coach for the journey to Whitby, I couldn't understand peoples repulsion, but I have seen many a green face leg it to the side of the boat ;) ;) ;)

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Stena do seem keen on marketing - got a 25% discount thing sent through, but my week off in February is Dover based, all at 50p each way of course.

 

Russell

 

 

Stena from Dover? And for 50p? What route is that?

 

 

 

It also reminded me of my youth when we used to go wreck fishing for Conga Eels out of Whitby

 

 

Must have had a big following. ... :rolleyes:

 

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Two separate paragraphs - Stena are keen on marketing. .... another paragraph would have been better for "next trip ex Dover at 50p each way" - the latter was P&O

 

I'm all booked for October on the Stena Superfast ex Holyhead, will book the Jonathan Swift on the day, then onto Fishguard and the Stena Europe, then Pembroke for the Isle of Innishmore before going onto Poole area for at least two returns on the Austal fast craft to Guernsey. Hopefully, the Stena Europe and the Condor Liberation will get a real hammering.

 

Look at these people enjoying themselves on the outer deck of the Stena Europe

 

Russ

 

(I have also found a trawlerman who will take me out in Weymouth, so if it is rough, I'll be going)

post-15168-0-20322100-1439235275_thumb.jpg

Online blog and travels, although sometimes there is a lack of travel due to work!

 

It's an uncharted sea, it's an unopened door but you've got to reach out and you've got to explore.

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I get seasick sat in the bath!

I have a great fear of water, which stems from being tipped out of a motor launch on a lake and fished out with a boathook, at a very young age.

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