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Dpf Info For Driver


SamD
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SDA started a thread very recently and, sort of, dismissed a diesel cos of short journeys and dpf considerations.

I think dpf should self-clean every 3-500 miles and I understand the only visual result might be a puff of white smoke on completion. I have never seen one on any of my cars nor have I noticed it on any other car.

Could not manufacturers provide dashboard info when the car has driven, say 600 miles and cleaning has not taken place AND then info you it has completed (once you've blown it down the M1)?

I have never had dpf problems but would be a lot happier with that sort of info.

Sam :beardy:

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(once you've blown it down the M1)

Good luck with that :)

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi

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or

 


Could not manufacturers provide dashboard info when the car has driven, say 600 miles and cleaning has not taken place

 

Yes they do, sadly no one ever bothers to read the owners manual which tells driver what to do when warning lights illuminate.

In one manufacturers case a flashing warning light means drive the car and give me a chance let me regenerate !

 

Sadly most think its fault, turn ignition off and light goes away . ... until engine loses power then its a £150 bill to fix. Keeps me busy sorting out their DPF problems though ;-)

 

Moral of the story if more drivers actually read owners manual rather than thinking they are a technical expert and know everything then half of the issues with DPF's wouldn't exist.

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As I understand it, DPF regeneration just happens on most vehicles. .. one or two use a 'special fluid' that need topping up at the service. .. but - other than as a 'fault' when you're told that the DPF needs attention it is something you don't need to worry about.

 

I have a Ford Galaxy auto and so do the in-laws. Both are 'second user' and exactly the same age 09 reg (same reg plate barring the last letter!) and I've never seen any light/warning on screen. When they first had it they got a warning a few times and the DPF was changed under warranty. Since then nothing. That's now some 3 years later. We only do around 6,000 miles per year, and the in-laws a lot less. However both vehicles will travel for 20 minutes or so at a reasonable speed regularly, and we don't sit it traffic jams too often round here.

2012 Bailey Pegasus 2 Rimini towed by 2019 Ford Galaxy Titanium X, 2.0 EcoBlue, 8 speed auto.

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I am a great fan of premium diesel, this contains more cetanes

and burns more completely. Cetanes are probably the additive

that cleans the DPF on some cars. I always fill up with premium

diesel when towing and before a long (ish) journey.

Nowadays I don't use the car so much and tend to fill up with premium

as a matter of course.

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No need to use any premium fuels.

And I mainly do short journeys, only around 6. 5K miles a year.

 

Modern diesels do a regen on a timed period, or sooner if the differential pressure asks it to.

I suspect the two fords mentioned above had a replacement DPF and a software update.

 

Early T31 Xtrails were having warning lights come on, but later models such as the one I had never saw a DPF dash warning light.

 

An indication of a scheduled regen is to see the instantaneous fuel read out drop low while driving.

Some fiats actually have a dash light to indicate that a timed regen is in progress.

 

I'm not an expert on DPF issues, but I do a lot of reading, so pick up knowledge.

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You can tell on my Kia Rio when it's doing a regen on the motorway. The instantaneous fuel consumption reading goes from about 70 mpg down to low 40 mpg for a few miles then back up again.

 

It also has a strong burning smell if it starts a regen and does not comete by the time you stop!

 

Mike

VW Touareg 3. 0L V6 262 R Line with a Unicorn IV Segovia trying to keep up!

 

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or

 

 

 

Yes they do, sadly no one ever bothers to read the owners manual which tells driver what to do when warning lights illuminate.

In one manufacturers case a flashing warning light means drive the car and give me a chance let me regenerate !

 

Sadly most think its fault, turn ignition off and light goes away . ... until engine loses power then its a £150 bill to fix. Keeps me busy sorting out their DPF problems though ;-)

 

Moral of the story if more drivers actually read owners manual rather than thinking they are a technical expert and know everything then half of the issues with DPF's wouldn't exist.

I'm on my fourth vehicle fitted with a DPF, not one of them has had any warning light to indicate that the DPF is doing a regen, but also only one have these has experienced a DPF problem, this was down to a dodgy sensor replaced under warranty.

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Our Skoda 2010 Roomster 's DPF light came on, a short drive to the garage it then went into Safe Mode. The

garage regenerated it by using the computer so fixed, this was last October.

 

Yesterday we drove up and down to Thirsk and 3 miles from home the light came on again, I had

been doing 70 + so not driving in slow traffic.

 

Parked up for the night and then off to Halfords to put some cleaning fluid in, thought I would give it

a go as the light was still showing.

 

Put the liquid in switched on the ignition and blow me down the light had disappeared, I will report back

later with any update. Fingers crossed that I do not need to post again on this topic.

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Do not have any problem at all with mine and I do a lot of short journeys. Dpf on end of turbo and gets very hot gas into it to keep it clear. It does a programmed regen every 400-600 miles and normally you do not know it is happening, unless in slow traffic or stationery when the engine revs go up to 1,000rpm and the radiator fans kick in to clear the heat from the engine compartment. If you stop this regen too many times, then you get a yellow light (never happened to me in 2 years) then all it needs is a 20 min run with revs at about 1,000 to clear. As said, read the car manual and understand how they work.

Škoda Octavia Estate 2. 0TDi 4x4 towing a Compass Omega 482.

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Sadly the light came on again.

 

Computer found that it was the EGR Valve, re set but a short drive later the warning light reappeared so

I will need a new EGR Valve. Drats and double drats.

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Yorkie,

 

I sincerely hope it is just the valve not a dpf, I always use a diesel additive to keep the system clean. I've had a Zafira that was always asking for a regen every two weeks with reasonable A & B road usage. I had to keep driving till it had finished even if i'd reached my destination! This being an EU directive to save emissions!

 

Changed to a Merc Vito doing exactly the same usage and in 3 years I've not had an issue. Mileage on lately it is now a dual carriageway 16 mile round trip, and all is still well.

 

Friend had a 58 plate Qashqai 2 litre D Auto which had dpf issues, in the end Nissan would not clear the error under warranty. He was selling it to a trader and the dpf light came on, he drove over 100 miles to get it out as he thought they'd knock money off!

 

I recommend not watching you vehicle go through a manual regen as it is a brutal process, lots of revs, heat and noise! Oil changes are necessary because so much diesel is going in and not being burnt it pollutes the engine oil. Worst case scenarios are that the engine begins to run on it's own sump oil and revs to destruction :(

Mercedes Vito and Valencia 2012

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There's no need to put any additives into a modern diesel, my 2009 Xtrail never had any problems with the DPF despite mainly short journeys and only 27K miles over 4 plus years.(models 2007 to 8 did)

 

Indeed the Mazda I have at present states quite clearly " do not add any fuel additives as you could damage the emission system" or words to that effect.

And I'm pretty sure that Nissan say the same.

Edited by xtrailman
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EGR Valve with Cooler Unit as from 2010/11 models some pipe plus gaskets, going in tomorrow, cancel

the Crème Eggs as this part is a Dealer Only Purchase.

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My Xtrail is the same, I always have the mpg displayed on the dash and a regen drops the mpg from 40 to about 26 for about 13 miles. It is important when the mpg falls to keep driving until the mpg goes back up otherwise a "Failed DPF regen" will clock up in the ECU. Great for the environment!

It used to be a problem for me, but it is now over 2 years / 20k miles since I had the DPF light come on. I put this down to using premium fuels, avoiding short journeys and keeping the revs over 2000rpm when possible. 2000 being the ideal cruising speed anyway (peak torque).

 

I note typically French cars and others, do I a different way, they inject an additive into the tank every fill. This additive then has to be refilled after the order of 40k miles. Not a good idea to keep brimming up the tank if you have this system.

Chris in Warwickshire, Elddis Odyssey 482 (2008), Mitsubishi Outlander diesel, 2017

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