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Warranty Repair


Kazb
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Hi. Does anyone know how long it takes for a warranty repair to be processed. We have the dreaded damp front locker and although Bailey have apparently authorised the repair, the repair shop carrying out the job are still waiting for the parts to be sent by Bailey. The damp was found during 3rd service in mid November. Thanks

Always said. ."I'm not having a caravan. ..that's not proper camping!" Now I have my Bailey Olympus 464. .why didn't I get one sooner?!!

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As a well documented problem, discussed many times here. One would expect Bailey to be prepared with stocks of required parts, being aware of how many so far, and calculating the potential for more, with a little seasonal bias. In the absence of any sort of recall, one would expect proactive support to be a priority.

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As a well documented problem, discussed many times here. One would expect Bailey to be prepared with stocks of required parts, being aware of how many so far, and calculating the potential for more, with a little seasonal bias. In the absence of any sort of recall, one would expect proactive support to be a priority.

 

:goodpost:

 

But you could expect the dealer to hold stock .

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Why should the dealer hold stock

The more I learn the more I know,the more I know the more I forget,the more I forget the less I know :blink:

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Why should the dealer hold stock

 

You think they shouldn't, given the vast majority of these repairs are carried out at the dealer and not at Bailey.

 

What are the parts required ?

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If you issue stock to the dealers, you lose a little control as a manufacturer.

In a similar case some years ago, I had the kits boxed and ready to go overnight as soon as a dealer puts a claim in. That way, repair kits issued by chassis number helped monitor progress and budget on the size and cost of the whole problem. Simple proactive preparation.

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If you issue stock to the dealers, you lose a little control as a manufacturer.

In a similar case some years ago, I had the kits boxed and ready to go overnight as soon as a dealer puts a claim in. That way, repair kits issued by chassis number helped monitor progress and budget on the size and cost of the whole problem. Simple proactive preparation.

 

So you wouldn't class the stocking of these parts to be pro-active, given that the type of repair is now a standard one.

 

The objective is the customer not the manufacture. ..... :(

 

I had a repair done to a hatch, the dealer already stocked the parts and turned the repair around within hours of a emergency repair to keep the van secure. That's being pro-active giving excellent service.

Edited by Gaz40
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You refer to a car manuf and dealer relationship.

Caravan industry completely different, there is no trust that dealers won't abuse the system, and use parts for other issues. Dealers are generally multi franchise so manuf will lose track of jobs. There is also control of returned parts if recharge to a supplier is required.

At the end of the day, an overnight 'as needs' supply is cost effective and meets customer needs.

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You refer to a car manuf and dealer relationship.

Caravan industry completely different, there is no trust that dealers won't abuse the system, and use parts for other issues. Dealers are generally multi franchise so manuf will lose track of jobs. There is also control of returned parts if recharge to a supplier is required.

At the end of the day, an overnight 'as needs' supply is cost effective and meets customer needs.

 

My post above refers to a caravan and a caravan dealer.

 

Sadly your painting a sad picture of manufactures relationships to their dealers with little trust. I understand an overnight, just in time delivery but that doesn't seemed to happened to the OP.

 

A competent dealer should be able to profile stock, manage warranty claims and their returns with various franchises and I should imagine that most dealers do.

Edited by Gaz40
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My post above refers to a caravan and a caravan dealer.

 

Sadly your painting a sad picture of manufactures relationships to their dealers with little trust. I understand a overnight, just in time delivery, but that doesn't seemed to happened to the OP.

 

A competent dealer should be able to profile stock, manage warranty claims and their returns with various franchises and I should imagine that most do.

I paint the picture from extensive experience, most dealers will not profile stock, nor manage their claims or returns. They satisfy many warranty claims on the hoof, lose track of parts, lose returns, and don't reclaim all their hours. You were lucky.

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My dealer has had my caravan for damp front lockers repair for seven weeks.

 

Once I had convinced them that there was a problem It took 12 days for Bailey to agree the work and send the repair kit for the warranty work. .....4 tubes of sealant some labour and some paint. They then asked the dealer to also take off the back bumpers and the side covers and check for damp, but did not offer any guidance on where specifically to look. . The dealer has complained that Bailey are the worst manufacture of all that they deal with, and that they Bailey are reluctant to issue guidance on any repair process.

 

Allegedly, there is very little sealant between the offside wheel arch and the front of the van. Apparently photos have to be taken and sent to Bailey before they will issue the authority and parts to repair under warranty.

 

Pre-stocking repair kits at dealers? Allegedly mine is the first damp one they have seen, and anyway the kits are only issued by Bailey to meet a specific warranty requirement.

Freelander 2 chased by a 2011 Unicorn Valencia

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Having talked to my service centre, they say bailey are best to deal with when it comes to warranty work. I just wonder if some dealers blame Bailey to cover their own shortcomings.

Just a thought

Poolebob

Honda CRV Diesel Petrol & No caravan now. :angry:

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The sealent used is RV51, available from the Bailey parts site to everyone.

 

I don't know the details of the black "paint", but it appears to do nothing but disguise the the water stains in the ply, it certainly does nothing to stop the water ingress spreading, if its getting in.

 

All three front bumpers need removing, so the decals need to be removed, and probably replaced.

 

Dealers are now instructed to seal all round the caravan floor, so the side skirts and rear bumpers will also be removed, the grab handles also packed.

 

Recently got mine back from its 3rd repair, it took the dealer two weeks to fit me in, and two weeks to complete the repair, originally they said one week.

 

They also said they had now sealed hundreds of lockers, but still had to consult with Bailey re the best action to take, as the previous repair was a factory one. Some mod was done this time, but it wasn't clear what.

 

I think the OP needs to find another dealer.

Edited by xtrailman
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sealant would be something that all dealers would keep in stock, even if they need to order the sealant, if bailey have it in stock they would receive the order within 2 days, and this goes for most items (other than large panels which have to be sent via a different carrier)

 

With regards to the black paint, we don't use what Bailey supply, we use a creosote to actually seal the untreated timber, we feel this is a more permanent solution.

Edited by Caravantech

 

 

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sealant would be something that all dealers would keep in stock, even if they need to order the sealant, if bailey have it in stock they would receive the order within 2 days, and this goes for most items (other than large panels which have to be sent via a different carrier)

 

With regards to the black paint, we don't use what Bailey supply, we use a creosote to actually seal the untreated timber, we feel this is a more permanent solution.

 

 

:goodpost:

 

On the last repair /seal my dealer already stocked the sealant and the decals tend to get re-used.

 

My dealer also doesnt use the "Bailey Black Paint" and your preservative is a much better idea. I think Ronseal do a black exterior wood treatment.

Edited by Gaz40
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sealant would be something that all dealers would keep in stock, even if they need to order the sealant, if bailey have it in stock they would receive the order within 2 days, and this goes for most items (other than large panels which have to be sent via a different carrier)

 

With regards to the black paint, we don't use what Bailey supply, we use a creosote to actually seal the untreated timber, we feel this is a more permanent solution.

That's interesting, any particular creosote?

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That's interesting, any particular creosote?

I would caution against creosote, it will damage insulation if it comes into contact. An emulsion based preservative is safer, such as snowcem.

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Would this be effective over the black covering?

Yes, it was recommended by swift for many years

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That's interesting, any particular creosote?

all we use is good old cuprinol, though I cant see that it would matter vastly which type to use IMO

 

I would caution against creosote, it will damage insulation if it comes into contact. An emulsion based preservative is safer, such as snowcem.

luckily there isn't any exposed insulation to speak of inside the wet lockers, though its certainly worth a mention if anyone planned to do it on a different van.

 

 

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But there are cables in both side lockers, running along the floor up against the outer wall, then running up the front corners, the corners are covered, but not those along the floor.

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Just a point. Proper Creosote hasn't been available to the general public since 2003 and since then the general public are not allowed either to use it or even store it. If you really do want to know more see here. http://www. hse. gov. uk/biocides/copr/creosote. htm

 

poolebob

Honda CRV Diesel Petrol & No caravan now. :angry:

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Ok, but which product is it?http://www. snowcempaints. com/paints. htm

Hi, sorry I can't say now.

I did mine many years ago, but in those days there was only one, used for brickwork. It was grey, semi-thick, and I did the inside of the vent holes too.

I did it because the underside looked like bare ply, but i was told it was exterior grade. Swift later started painting them with black emulsion paint to stop people questioning.

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