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Ideas Wanted To Ease Access Through Gate


T00ts
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Some of you will already know that I am on the countdown to moving house. Still no contracts exchanged, but I'm told it is all going to happen in a rush, so it got me thinking about moving the eggshell.

 

The driveway is one of those that runs down the side of the house with a double gate across. They are supported on one side by 4x4" post fixed to the wall, but the other side is fixed to the final fence post that splits the gardens.

 

Across the top is a 2x2" rail which I am assuming counteracts the the weight of the gates (about 2. 5m wide) especially on the fence post.

 

The van is narrow enough to go through (carefully with a mover) but the top rail is only at about 6' 4" so will have to be removed to let the van through.

 

Here's the question. Has anybody got a design idea which would allow me to take down/swing that top rail away and back again once through? I don't fancy having to remove screws every time, and my brain is so clogged with removal prep I'm struggling to think of the best way to do it.

 

I'm hoping someone has already solved the problem!

 

Over to you and thanks.

T00ts

You've only failed when you've stopped trying! xx

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Ditch the cross beam and fit these to remove a lot of the weight of the gate.

 

http://www. screwfix. com/p/gate-castor/91291

Kia KX 3 auto / Bailey Alicanto Grande Estoril and Swift Challenger 570 (2010 model Not towed - used as a static)
 

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Toots, do you have a pic so I can see if it is load bearing or just a cross post.

 

Are the gates heavy?

 

H.

Finding things funny since 1968 :blink:

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Toots, do you have a pic so I can see if it is load bearing or just a cross post.

 

Are the gates heavy?

 

H.

 

Not yet - it seems a bit cheeky to arrive with camera. I think the castors idea (see post #2) may be the answer, if there is sufficient room underneath.

 

(Edit) Sorry the gates are those ones that look like woven fence panels with trellis on the top.

Edited by T00ts

T00ts

You've only failed when you've stopped trying! xx

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Yup, they will help with the opening too, as long as the floor is sound.

 

H.

Finding things funny since 1968 :blink:

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Yup, they will help with the opening too, as long as the floor is sound.

 

H.

 

Yes drive is block paving so should be fine.

 

Ditch the cross beam and fit these to remove a lot of the weight of the gate.

 

http://www. screwfix. com/p/gate-castor/91291

 

Thanks I didn't know they existed - looks as though they could be the solution.

T00ts

You've only failed when you've stopped trying! xx

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Just remember they are spring loaded so will not take the full weight of the gates ;)

 

On a side note I'm a happy northerner ;) (private joke)

 

H.

Finding things funny since 1968 :blink:

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Concur with Alan Stanley, I`ve used these on really heavy farm gates and they are very effective.

 

As they fit on the side of the gate rather than under it, the height of the bottom of the gate isn`t critical

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Just remember they are spring loaded so will not take the full weight of the gates ;)

 

On a side note I'm a happy northerner ;) (private joke)

 

H.

 

:lol:

T00ts

You've only failed when you've stopped trying! xx

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In theory you could remove the cross-beam, extend the posts upwards (bolt angle iron to each of them), then replace cross-beam, bolted to the irons at a height above the top of the caravan. That would prevent the posts leaning in towards each other as the weight of the gates comes on them. A lot of work, and not very pretty. The sprung castors are definitely the first move (even if you have to lift some blocks to lay a really smooth concrete arc for each of them to run on, if the gates wobble when opening).

If at first you don't succeed, it may be best to give up.

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In theory you could remove the cross-beam, extend the posts upwards (bolt angle iron to each of them), then replace cross-beam, bolted to the irons at a height above the top of the caravan. That would prevent the posts leaning in towards each other as the weight of the gates comes on them. A lot of work, and not very pretty. The sprung castors are definitely the first move (even if you have to lift some blocks to lay a really smooth concrete arc for each of them to run on, if the gates wobble when opening).

 

I had come up with a similar idea myself but didn't want to frighten the neighbours. It'll be enough of a shock when/if I move in as it is! :)

T00ts

You've only failed when you've stopped trying! xx

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I've got sprung castors like that on my big gates. The spring is useless. ...too weak when taking the weight of a large heavy gate, it merely grounds in its bracket. It also relies on the surface being level. If there is any fall in the driveway, it can be a pain getting it to contact within the springs travel.

 

I beefed up the post and hinges to take the cantilever load without the need for the wheel 'prop'

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we look after a site at work that has indespension units on its large entrance gates. they work, from past experience the spring loaded casters are hit and miss.

A seemingly problem free 2010 model Adria Altea 542dk that has more than its fair share of use.

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What about smaller gates :ph34r:

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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indespension units

 

What are these?

 

I don't think you would class these gates as particularly heavy since they are similar to woven fence panels + trellis across the top, but the cross bar is probably to reduce the pull on the fence post on the one side.

What about smaller gates :ph34r:

 

:wub:

T00ts

You've only failed when you've stopped trying! xx

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indespension units are simple trailer suspension. they have the them fitted with the small 8" wheels. it wouldnt be suitable for you as they will loose you valuable width. the site where they are has large gates wide enough for 2 lorrys at a time. i used it as an example for an idea that does work. where ime sprung casters do not. (i have been involved with gate automation for over 20 yrs and have seen many attempts by others to prevent posts sagging)

A seemingly problem free 2010 model Adria Altea 542dk that has more than its fair share of use.

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indespension units are simple trailer suspension. they have the them fitted with the small 8" wheels. it wouldnt be suitable for you as they will loose you valuable width. the site where they are has large gates wide enough for 2 lorrys at a time. i used it as an example for an idea that does work. where ime sprung casters do not. (i have been involved with gate automation for over 20 yrs and have seen many attempts by others to prevent posts sagging)

 

So what would you suggest?

T00ts

You've only failed when you've stopped trying! xx

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if the brace is to prevent the posts sagging then the only propper option is to replace the posts with some that are upto the job. if they are normal fence posts then they are only suitable for quite small gates. for normal domestic size gates we use 100mm steel box or 150mm oak posts as a minimum if space is tight. normally its 150mm steel or 200mm oak.

pics will help if you do get the property. without its a guessing game.

A seemingly problem free 2010 model Adria Altea 542dk that has more than its fair share of use.

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My mum had a similar problem - all we did was remove the cross beam. Screw an M12 stud into the top of each upright and bore a corresponding hole into each end of the cross beam.

Then all you've got to do is lift it off to get the van in and then replace it when it's through. You can put a nut and washer on top if you really want to but we never found it was necessary. Each gate was solid and 6' high by 4' wide. The posts were 4" square oak just concreted in (supporting gates on either side) and the cross beam was just a lump of 2"x4" - did it 25 years ago and it still works

2018 S-Max Titanium 2. 0 Tdci (177. 54bhp,180ps,132kw) Powershift + 2015 Unicorn III Cadz, Ventura Marlin porch awning

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My mum had a similar problem - all we did was remove the cross beam. Screw an M12 stud into the top of each upright and bore a corresponding hole into each end of the cross beam.

Then all you've got to do is lift it off to get the van in and then replace it when it's through. You can put a nut and washer on top if you really want to but we never found it was necessary. Each gate was solid and 6' high by 4' wide. The posts were 4" square oak just concreted in (supporting gates on either side) and the cross beam was just a lump of 2"x4" - did it 25 years ago and it still works

:goodpost:

If at first you don't succeed, it may be best to give up.

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My mum had a similar problem - all we did was remove the cross beam. Screw an M12 stud into the top of each upright and bore a corresponding hole into each end of the cross beam.

Then all you've got to do is lift it off to get the van in and then replace it when it's through. You can put a nut and washer on top if you really want to but we never found it was necessary. Each gate was solid and 6' high by 4' wide. The posts were 4" square oak just concreted in (supporting gates on either side) and the cross beam was just a lump of 2"x4" - did it 25 years ago and it still works

 

That's really easy and could be idiot proof and I like it's simplicity - could be the way to go - thanks.

T00ts

You've only failed when you've stopped trying! xx

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We have a similar situation, but our gates are 7'-6" high wrought iron with uPVC panels. My main problem was the gates bowing inwards at the top due to wind force, and there being no bolting facility at the top. I solved the problem by fitting a cross beam that is fixed to one gate, and swings aside with it. When the gates are closed, simple bolting allows rigidity to be restored. But you do need enough room to bring the caravan forwards to clear the extended bar.

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It may be worth considering who owns the fence and post(s) in question as most boundary dividing fences / walls/ hedges are owned by one owner and will be marked on the deeds.

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It may be worth considering who owns the fence and post(s) in question as most boundary dividing fences / walls/ hedges are owned by one owner and will be marked on the deeds.

 

Yes thanks they are mine so no problems.

T00ts

You've only failed when you've stopped trying! xx

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