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Bailey Discovery Se Limousin 5 Berth


coolrunner
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hi all i have a baily discvery se, i have just renewed the fuse box (consumer unit) but i cant get electric into the van,all the wireing is correct so their must be some kind of trip switch somewhere but i dont know where (i renewed the fuse box as the old one burnt out,which also makes me think their must be some sort of trip switch somewhere,any help please

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hi all i have a baily discvery se, i have just renewed the fuse box (consumer unit) but i cant get electric into the van,all the wireing is correct so their must be some kind of trip switch somewhere but i dont know where (i renewed the fuse box as the old one burnt out,which also makes me think their must be some sort of trip switch somewhere,any help please

 

Hi coolrunner. How old is your Bailey? I thought that the Limousin was from the last of the Pageant Series 7 (S7) before production was ceased.

The Discovery was a totally different model and not from the Pageant series at all.

Life in general can be a journey of chance with some winners and sadly some losers. Your outfit can never be left to chance. A short-while carrying out essential checks can ensure a long-time of happy & safe caravanning for all concerned.
Ignorance can often be bliss but is certainly not an excuse and when continually disregarded they can be totally disastrous for oneself and the innocent parties.

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Have you fault finded with a multi-meter?

I would add that as you can't get mains 240V into the van, you should not try yourself unless you really know what you're doing and the risks involved.

You should have mains at the incoming socket, and this then goes to the consumer unit which will have no fuses but will have various MCB's (miniature circuit breakers). Normally the left hand one will act as the main 'switch' or isolator to the rest of the MCB's.

 

If in doubt, get a local electrician.

Graham

Unless otherwise stated all posts are my personal opinion 

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I am an electrician, but as a previous Bailey owner, I must admit this puzzles me.

When you say that the previous consumer unit burnt out, what exactly do you mean?

I would understand if a loose connection on the incoming (or out going for that matter) of the main switch caused arcing and then failure of the switch.

It would be unlikely that the unit itself would fail.

As you have replaced the whole thing, provided all connections have been correctly made, then we can rule the new unit out.

If the cause of the original failure was as I described, then the most likely cause is that the cable from the 16A inlet on the caravan has overheated further back up its length from the main switch and has failed.

I would advise immediate disconnection from any mains supply and then examination and probable replacement of (what should be) the short length of cable from the inlet to the consumer unit.

Without seeing it myself it is impossible to give a firm diagnosis, but there shouldn't be anything between the inlet and the main switch that interrupts the supply.

Another thought popped into my mind, I imagine you're probably hooking up to your house supply using an adaptor cable to convert from the 16A hook-up plug to a 13A one. If this was the adaptor used when you found the initial problem, did the 13A fuse in the adaptor lead fail at the same time due to the fault?

It's probably something you've already checked, but I'm just making sure.

Ssangyong Korando Sports SX / Adria Altea 472DS Eden

 

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the 13 amp fuse didnt blow,we were using a household electric heater and have been for a few weeks as we are decorating the van, the consumer unit, the top wires melted and the box got so hot it went out of shape

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The top wires would be the cable that runs from the power inlet.

To me it sounds as though the cable itself has failed. The heat would have travelled back along the conductors, and if a few of them have failed, the rest of the strands would act like fusewire and the inner core will simply melt.

I've seen it happen with a much larger cable on a commercial installation, and in that case a 10mm cable failed leaving a distribution board with no neutral and the associated car park without lighting. And that was only with a 20A load!

The cable fitted to caravans would be 2. 5mm and with a 13A load and a loose connection (I'm 95% certain that would be the original cause of the fault) it would soon get pretty hot, which, as it melted and distorted the consumer unit, it did.

Ssangyong Korando Sports SX / Adria Altea 472DS Eden

 

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hi and thanks for the reply,i am sure the consumer unit is wired correctly and what you say sounds as though its the problem,but as you will all be pleased i have a qualified electrician coming to check everything for me,i will let you know what the outcome is,

Also do you think the heater and possibly some condensation caused the problem,

 

DSC_0008_zps6823faf3.jpg

Edited by coolrunner
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Looking at that picture, the fault was certainly caused by a loose neutral connection at the 16A circuit breaker.

The condensation wouldn't have been a factor.

In the unlikely event of condensation getting into the electrics, if it was across Live and Neutral it would normally blow itself clear with a puff of steam, but, possibly, might trip the circuit breaker for the affected circuit.

If it was across Live or neutral and Earth, the RCD would simply trip.

The heater would have been a factor in as much as the load being drawn would cause the heating of the loose connection.

With a new consumer unit in place, providing all the connections are tight (every new one I've fitted in the last few years always comes with a warning notice to check the tightness of all connectuions including the factory fitted ones) there will be no risk of further damage.

 

The moral of this issue is if you don't have an electrical safety inspection (officially known as an Electrical Condition Report (formerly Periodic Inspection Report)) carried out each year, as recommended by BS 7671 (IEE Wiring Regulations 17th. Edition), who does?, then it is a good idea to check the tightness of all the connections from time to time, as once anything gets a bit loose, the vibrations that happen when towing will quickly make it worse.

Ssangyong Korando Sports SX / Adria Altea 472DS Eden

 

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thankyou,i will do regular checks to check tightness after all it doesnt take long and will be well worth it. .thanks again

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