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New Rule For M.o.t.


Doosan
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If you own a Diesel motor and you have removed the DPF it WILL FAIL.

 

https://www. gov. uk/government/news/new-rules-for-mot-to-test-for-diesel-particulate-filter

 

Bailey Pageant Series 6 Champagne 2007    Tow Car Toyota Rav4

 

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Yea, doesn't seem to stop people fitting them for the MOT and then removing them again afterwards though. ..

Luckily when I bought my Touran I had the option of a DPF or no DPF so I opted to get one without. . As I wasn't a company car driver it did not affect the BIK tax for me. No brainer for me.

Edited by dreadly

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi

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Oh yes, we can all afford to have them removed and refitted every year just to get through the MOT. :angry:

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Oh yes, we can all afford to have them removed and refitted every year just to get through the MOT. :angry:

Thats simple to get around. .................. If you cannot afford it don't remove it.

A seemingly problem free 2010 model Adria Altea 542dk that has more than its fair share of use.

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Not sure why you would want to remove one, maybe save a bit on fuel ? ok if you did high mileage but for the average 12,000 pa surly not worth the bother.

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Not sure why you would want to remove one, maybe save a bit on fuel ? ok if you did high mileage but for the average 12,000 pa surly not worth the bother.

I wouldn't but people do because:

 

They clog up in conurbation driving and cause the car to go into limp home mode and cost a small fortune to replace if it won't re-generate. DPF will often make a cheaper secondhand car uneconomical to repair if this situation occurs.

 

This means diesels are only now suitable for mixed road type use and preferably where they get a good blast out now and then.

 

Manufacturers are recommending for stop start and heavy traffic for people to take petrol options.

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I have a dpf on my skoda superb its now done 135k and the only problem has been to replace the dpf fluid, otherwise no other problems with it at all, it's working life is a taxi in city traffic most of the time.

 

kot

pigs

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There are ways round this:

 

Several UK companies can replace the DPF with a clone ie: A DPF without any innards or removing your own DPF and gutting it.

If it is the latter no one can tell the difference.

 

Simples.

 

Regards.

Col

Proud to be a Patriot and CT Ninja
I get the feeling that beneath your sesquipedalian loquaciousness you're the same kind of fundamentalist intent on winning arguments through Argumentum Verbosium.

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There are ways round this:

 

Several UK companies can replace the DPF with a clone ie: A DPF without any innards or removing your own DPF and gutting it.

If it is the latter no one can tell the difference.

 

Simples.

 

Regards.

Col

Will it still pass emission tests?

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi

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There are ways round this:

 

Several UK companies can replace the DPF with a clone ie: A DPF without any innards or removing your own DPF and gutting it.

If it is the latter no one can tell the difference.

 

Simples.

 

Regards.

Col

Like when i attempted to drill out the core of the cat on my old Clio. until i found out i didn't need it as i was fitting a pre cat age turbo engine from a volvo 440. At least mine was completely above board with no worries of getting found out.

A seemingly problem free 2010 model Adria Altea 542dk that has more than its fair share of use.

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Diesel vehicles are not subject to an emissions test, instead they are subject to a Metered Smoke Test. During the smoke test the opacity of the smoke is tested, the exhaust gases are not measured or recorded. Removing the DPF will not cause the opacity of the smoke to rise high enough to fail, it is very difficult to get a diesel engine vehicle to fail the smoke test.

DPF's were not designed to help cars pass the MOT, they are the result of European legislation and the pressure on car manufacturers. The smoke test was implemented long before DPF's were fitted to cars.

Common rail technology and modern engine management systems have resulted in very clean burning diesel engines which do not require a DPF to pass the more stringent smoke test. If the engine is in good mechanical condition and has been well maintained then removing the DPF will not result in a smoke test failure . A jammed or blocked EGR valve can cause excessive smoke and block the DPF.

The new MOT rule calls for 'a visual inspection of the DPF'. This will be a simple visual inspection to make sure the DPF is in place. If it looks like a DPF. ........If it feels like a DPF. .........................It is a DPF.

In some instances a particular make or model of car may need the ECU remapping.

 

If anyone else is interested in DPF removal I can only suggest a search on the interweb. There is probably a company that will do this for you not to many miles from your home.

 

HTH.

 

Regards.

Col

Proud to be a Patriot and CT Ninja
I get the feeling that beneath your sesquipedalian loquaciousness you're the same kind of fundamentalist intent on winning arguments through Argumentum Verbosium.

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The vehicle must meet the emissions regulation valid at the time of manufacture or first registration. Since 2009 engines are required to emit less than 5mg/km of soot particles. The law itself does not specifically require a DPF, but it is virtually impossible not to exceed the specified limit without one.


A quick visual inspection of the level of soot emissions carried out as part of the MOT can be relatively easily performed by holding a piece white tissue behind the exhaust pipe. If there is any significant discolouration, 5mg/km will most certainly be exceeded.


Edited by Lutz
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Lutz - if you look on the car forums there are lots of people that have already removed their dpf and still easily pass the MOT smoke tests.

 

Doesn't say much for the MOT tester

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Doesn't say much for the MOT tester

 

I feel it says all you and Vosa need to know about the integrity of the tester ;)

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I feel it says all you and Vosa need to know about the integrity of the tester ;)

 

Perhaps they will be a little more critical when the new rules come into force next February.

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Surely at the minute the mot test isn't a fail for not having the dpf, only a fail for the smoke test. So it has atm nothing to do with the tester if the car still passes the visual smoke test.

You will always get different views as its down to the way the tester interprets the mot bible. Hence when the new rule comes in it should make removed (not bypassed) dpf's a fail. The problem will then become if a car had not got dpf as std yet the tester is under the impression it did.

Some of the fairest mot testers are ones that have swallowed the bible, but o nothing about mecahnics. Then they have no personal view on what should or shouldn't be due to past experience.

 

 

Edited due to poor ipad spelling ;-)

Edited by clairendave

A seemingly problem free 2010 model Adria Altea 542dk that has more than its fair share of use.

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The problem will then become if a car had not got dpf as std yet the tester is under the impression it did.

 

That won't be an issue for recent cars - the tester knows what Euro-n emissions apply from the registration and computer details - all Euro-5 diesels must have a DPF.

2015 VW Touareg 3. 0 V6 TDI + 2013 Lunar Clubman ES

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That won't be an issue for recent cars - the tester knows what Euro-n emissions apply from the registration and computer details - all Euro-5 diesels must have a DPF.

 

Not quite, Euro 5 doesn't explicitly call for a DPF, but it is virtually impossible to meet Euro 5 without one.

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Having read about this on other forums, I think that the real problem may be the insurance companies being able to invalidate your insurance as your vehicle will no longer be road legal. The MOT tester may be easily hoodwinked by putting a 'blank' DPF in but I would imagine an insurance company's engineer will be a little more difficult to con when their is the chance of getting away without paying out for a claim.

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Doosan:

 

I agree with your post BUT. ........................removing the guts from a DPF and leaving the casing intact is a different ball game.

 

Mot examiners and technicians do not have X-ray vision.

 

Regards.

Col

Proud to be a Patriot and CT Ninja
I get the feeling that beneath your sesquipedalian loquaciousness you're the same kind of fundamentalist intent on winning arguments through Argumentum Verbosium.

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So first of all, MOT inspectors can't do any intrusive checks. Some of the removal options that are advertised actually take the guts outvof the DPF and refit the shell, hense an MOT inspector will never know.

 

As for fuel economy, my previous Navara (without DPF) did 36mpg. ...the new one (with DPF) struggles to do 30mpg! So over 12000 miles this is 66 gallons difference which is over £360 per year.

 

I don't know one mechanic who thinks DPF was ever a good idea.

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But there's not even need to crawl under the car to determine whether the DPF has been removed or not.

Edited by Lutz
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The DPF does not have a significant effect on nitrogen oxide emissions. NOx is the second of the two most harmful constituents of diesel exhaust, NOx has a harmful effect on red blood cells and it combines with moisture in the lungs to form nitric acid. Exposure to nitrogen oxides can cause or accelerate respiratory problems and NOx absorber catalysts are still being developed.

The use of DPF's actually increases carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. CO2 is the primary gas associated with global warming and reducing CO2 is targeted by the Kyoto Protocol. The additional CO2 is created both through the operation of the DPF and through the production of ultra low sulphur diesel (ULSD). In addition using ULSD results in slightly poorer fuel efficiency (despite its higher cost) which contributes to higher fuel consumption and an increase in CO2 emissions.

The precious metals like platinum, rhodium and palladium used in exhaust treatment devices slowly erode after time and are released into the atmosphere and it is believed these precious metals have also entered the food chain.

There is no doubt DPF's do reduce some of the harmful effects of diesel emissions but the DPF does not make a diesel engined vehicle wholly 'clean'.

 

Regards.

Col

Proud to be a Patriot and CT Ninja
I get the feeling that beneath your sesquipedalian loquaciousness you're the same kind of fundamentalist intent on winning arguments through Argumentum Verbosium.

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