Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Doosan

Heat A Room For 8P A Day

Recommended Posts

This guy says he heats his small boat or a room for 8p a day.

 

So a Journalist tried it in his small office and he found it worked for him.

 

Not a good idea if small children about.

 

Read here.

 

http://uk. finance. yahoo. com/news/im-heating-room-8p-day-102931828. html?vp=1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We're sorry! We're no longer able to display this video.


What a pity. ............ :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We're sorry! We're no longer able to display this video.

 

 

What a pity. ............ :rolleyes:

it works for me . . but there are stills, anyway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend was talking about this yesterday. After seeing a clip he decided to have a go and was Impressed.

He's bringing it into work soon to show us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Artist friend has been doing the plant pot thing for some time, he is really mean though.

 

geoff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can do 8p a day better.

 

He says 8p plus the electricity to run his computer.

 

In my home office, in our properly insulated Scandinavian designed house, even with snow on the ground outside, just the computer will make it so hot it's shorts and tee shirts to work. I'd give it a 7/10, could do better.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Replace the tea lights with a 50 Watt bulb . . works out at about 8p/day . . and reduced danger, CO2 and other products of combustion . .

 

Admit, I don't know the wattage of a tea light, anyone help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can do 8p a day better.

 

He says 8p plus the electricity to run his computer.

 

In my home office, in our properly insulated Scandinavian designed house, even with snow on the ground outside, just the computer will make it so hot it's shorts and tee shirts to work. I'd give it a 7/10, could do better.

 

 

In fact further research shows anyone can do better. Based on 8 candles over 8 hours is an average power of 60Watts. If you took an old 60W light bulb and ran it for 8 hours, at 15p a unit ( a high estimate) would be 7. 2p. So the article should read, Waste 0. 8p a day and risk burning your house down. .... Using the central heating on gas would be 50% cheaper still. . so remarked to 2/10 . . See Me. ..

Replace the tea lights with a 50 Watt bulb . . works out at about 8p/day . . and reduced danger, CO2 and other products of combustion . .

 

Admit, I don't know the wattage of a tea light, anyone help?

Assuming 5g each and 45MJ/Kg 8 tea lights is 60Watts, so you are close

Edited by MikeR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How sad am I, I was waiting for the pots to explode or similar. Warped sense of humour I suppose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But potty if you ask me :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This guy says he heats his small boat or a room for 8p a day.

 

So a Journalist tried it in his small office and he found it worked for him.

 

Not a good idea if small children about.

 

Read here.

 

http://uk. finance. yahoo. com/news/im-heating-room-8p-day-102931828. html?vp=1

 

It’s an awful lot of messing about for a fairly poor heat output. He states it costs £0. 08 pence per day sounds good, but he doesn’t specify how long his day is or what the heat output is.

 

At home I commissioned a coal effect gas fire made for my main lounge from an antique George II cast iron fire place – circa 1750.

 

My idea was an attractive focal point for the room and a backup source of heating just in case my central heating failed.

However around this time of year while the outside temperatures are around 3 to 5 degrees, I tend to use it as my main heat source. As a heat source it is very effective and very economical to use.

It runs on domestic natural gas and provides approximately 4 Kilo watts of heat output per hour on a medium setting. My gas provider is OVO and using only this gas fire I get just over five hours heating for £0. 08 pence.

 

It is a lot more convenient, safer and effective than four tea lights and two flower pots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are new ceramic filled electric radiators on the market. They make claims of energy saving; using low power to heat the ceramic and capture the heat. How good I don't know!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It’s an awful lot of messing about for a fairly poor heat output. He states it costs £0. 08 pence per day sounds good, but he doesn’t specify how long his day is or what the heat output is.

 

At home I commissioned a coal effect gas fire made for my main lounge from an antique George II cast iron fire place – circa 1750.

 

My idea was an attractive focal point for the room and a backup source of heating just in case my central heating failed.

However around this time of year while the outside temperatures are around 3 to 5 degrees, I tend to use it as my main heat source. As a heat source it is very effective and very economical to use.

It runs on domestic natural gas and provides approximately 4 Kilo watts of heat output per hour on a medium setting. My gas provider is OVO and using only this gas fire I get just over five hours heating for £0. 08 pence.

 

It is a lot more convenient, safer and effective than four tea lights and two flower pots.

 

I think you've missed the point.

The OP has demonstated a low-cost method of heating (low cost to make and low cost to operate).

Another post on here has suggested that some of the perceived risks could be mittigated by using 60W electricity bulbs as the heat source.

What was the cost of your elaborate and ornate installation?

Also, not everyone has a dedicated fireplace - nor the funds to create one. - Some don't even have gas on their premises!

I think it is a very good proposal (albeit with some minor inherent risks) - so instead of knocking it and bragging about my own system I say well done and thanks to the OP for sharing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are new ceramic filled electric radiators on the market. They make claims of energy saving; using low power to heat the ceramic and capture the heat. How good I don't know!

 

Pure snake oil. All electric heaters are 100% efficient, from the cheapest £9. 99 fan heater to the most expensive one you can find to buy. ...I can think of much better ways of wasting my money, or saving it for that matter too

 

I think you've missed the point.

Another post on here has suggested that some of the perceived risks could be mittigated by using 60W electricity bulbs as the heat source.

 

 

Not quite. A 60W light bulb would be both cheaper and safer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Pure snake oil. All electric heaters are 100% efficient, from the cheapest £9. 99 fan heater to the most expensive one you can find to buy. ...I can think of much better ways of wasting my money, or saving it for that matter too

 

Not quite. A 60W light bulb would be both cheaper and safer.

 

Mike;

You have made some fundamentally flawed assumptions.

Every application is unique and has its own inherent risks.

There will be some situations where use of electricity may be more dangerous.

There may be some situations where elctricity is not available.

That is why I used the terms perceived and could and have used the term may in this posting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are new ceramic filled electric radiators on the market. They make claims of energy saving; using low power to heat the ceramic and capture the heat. How good I don't know!

 

All electric heaters are 100% efficient so far as the consumer is concerned, all that varies is the method of delivery of the heat. There is a slight efficiency loss due to the resistance of the cables and voltage drop. Any which suggest they can save you money, can only save you money by using a lower wattage element and as everyone knows, lower wattage equals less heat out.

 

A 1Kw fan heater outputs exactly the same as a 1Kw ceramic heater, a 1Kw radiant heater, or an 1Kw IR heater, or an oil filled 1Kw heater. So claims that any particular type of heater will save you money, are absolute tosh.

 

Gas heaters can vary quite drastically in their efficiency, as can gas boilers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Mike;

You have made some fundamentally flawed assumptions.

Every application is unique and has its own inherent risks.

There will be some situations where use of electricity may be more dangerous.

There may be some situations where elctricity is not available.

That is why I used the terms perceived and could and have used the term may in this posting.

 

No assumptions, in this case the application and environment is stated.

 

Daytime usage in a domestic home office with electricity available. So in this case an electric heater (say putting a 60W bulb in a standard lamp on your desk) is both cheaper and safer. ..

 

The original claim was that it was cheap. We have shown there are many cheaper ways to heat a room. How many house fires have been started by candles and how many by light bulbs? Yes both have started fires but I'm willing to bet candles have started many more.

 

So the idea presented is more expensive and more dangerous and is been presented as an innovative good idea! Really?

 

The article is very poor science and very poor journalism.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slightly off topic. ..

For many years when I was young and touring the UK as a professional singer guitarist, along with warm extra clothing, I also ALWAYS carried candles and matches in my car during the winter months.

 

The idea behind it is that in some countries they advise this because if the car breaks down and the engine won't re-start in severely cold winter weather and recovery isn't possible immediately or you can't walk to safety, a lit candle would stave off the occupant of a car from freezing to death while waiting to be recovered or rescued if the wait was protracted.

 

Remaining in a car when temperatures outside have plummeted without any heat source in the vehicle can be more risky than actually leaving the vehicle as the steel bodywork reacts endothermically ( taking heat from it's surroundings) and can cause the occupant to suffer from hypothermia.

There are many documented cases where parents have taken their children camping in cold weather and misguidedly let their children sleep in the car, resulting in the kids actually suffering from hypothermia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

The article is very poor science and very poor journalism.

In your opinion ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a saying:

 

Give a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day.

 

Set a man on fire and he'll be warm the rest of his life! :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I estimate that four tea lights will have an output of about 200 Watts. The heater will probably allow the room temperature to increase by only a couple of degrees Celsius.

 

Interestingly, candles are very inefficient in their light output being approximately 0. 04% efficient which leaves 99. 96% of available output to be emitted as heat.

 

Perhaps the heater could be used to take the chill off caravan wash rooms or dry towels ? :rolleyes:

Edited by DeeTee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...