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Legally! What's The Score?


NedKelly

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Question.

 

Is it legal to leave your Van on the road outside your house overnight?

 

Are you supposed to have light's on? (i know if you leave a skip on the road overnight you should have orange warning lights on each corner)

 

Or are the rear light clusters sufficient? (as on a normal roadgoing car)

 

Mine is outside my house at the moment, (a cul-de-sac with approx 100 houses) parked opposite a street lamp.

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Question.

 

Is it legal to leave your Van on the road outside your house overnight?

 

Are you supposed to have light's on? (i know if you leave a skip on the road overnight you should have orange warning lights on each corner)

 

Or are the rear light clusters sufficient? (as on a normal roadgoing car)

 

Mine is outside my house at the moment, (a cul-de-sac with approx 100 houses) parked opposite a street lamp.

Hi,

Strictly speaking you can only park your caravan in the road overnight, if side lights are displayed for the duration, and provided it is not causing an obstruction. Unlike cars (and motorhomes), caravans are also required to display lights when parked within a 30 mph speed limit.

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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I stumbled on this which goes to explain some of the issues and legalities.

This is the Policy of Darlington Council.

Other councils may have different Policies

A caravan on a road has the same lighting requirements as a skip. It must of course not prevent vehicles from normal travel along the road.

There is case law which states that any vehicle on a road is an obstruction on the grounds it obstructs another vehicle from occupying that space.

Take that a bit further and it is logical that anything causes an obstruction on the grounds that it prevents something else from occupying that space.

As you are in a cul de sac, unless you get a complaining neighbour, I don't expect you will be subjected to any legal action.

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There is case law which states that any vehicle on a road is an obstruction on the grounds it obstructs another vehicle from occupying that space.

Take that a bit further and it is logical that anything causes an obstruction on the grounds that it prevents something else from occupying that space.

As you are in a cul de sac, unless you get a complaining neighbour, I don't expect you will be subjected to any legal action.

 

You are quite right regards the obstruction bit, even a car parked on a road, other than in a designated parking space, (ie lined etc) can be deemed to be obstructing the highway.

 

Most of the parking enforcement is now dealt with by local councils who want to make as much money as possible from us mugs (sorry motorists), however obstructing the highway is still dealt with by plod,your caravan, attached or otherwise needs lights and not obstructing anyones access to premises.

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On the grounds of common sense, I would tend to agree and this would not usually be a problem.

 

However, the law is the law (albeit an ass at times) and if some jobsworth neighbour complains or you are unfortunate enough to have a policeman notice it, you would more than likely either get a warning to shift it or be on the receiving end of an intention to prosecute notice.

 

Although the weblink I posted may well enlighten us with regards to that particular councils' policy. I think that you will find that it is based on the law of the land, in particular The Highways Act, therefore relevant for England as a whole.

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You are quite right regards the obstruction bit, even a car parked on a road, other than in a designated parking space, (ie lined etc) can be deemed to be obstructing the highway.

Funnily enough, the case law I quoted relates to a vehicle parked in a designated parking bay.

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Funnily enough, the case law I quoted relates to a vehicle parked in a designated parking bay.

 

Apologies, of course, definition of a highway, I had forgotten :o refers not only to the road, but extends to the boundaries, including verges etc :rolleyes: good job others remind us of what we forget at times !

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We fell foul of a miserable git neighbour, who complained to the council as soon as we pulled up on the front of our house. We had only just bought the caravan and were in the process of transferring our belongings from the shed to the van prior to it going into storage at the compound. As it was pretty late in the day, we decided to move everything the following morning and were in the process of doing so when the guy from the council turned up and told us we had to move the van or be prosecuted. When we explained the situation, he said it made no difference and the caravan had to be moved, it was at that point I gave him my car keys and walked away - before I punched his lights out. He was a typical jobsworth!

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I followed the link Laurie and Sandra left

 

And correct me if I'm wrong but Darlington . gov have contradicted them selves in this bit

look at numbers 2 and 4

 

 

1/The street is not a caravan park

 

2/Any parking, other than loading or unloading or because you are waiting for repairs following a breakdown is against the law

 

3/Caravans may not be covered by insurance when parked on streets

 

4/It against the law to park on the street at night without warning lights and you should always ensure that you park the caravan with the reflectors facing on-coming traffic

 

 

If you go to the Highway code

this is what it says about parking

 

224: Cars, goods vehicles not exceeding 1525kg unladen, invalid carriages and motorcycles may be parked without lights on a road (or lay-by) with a speed limit of 30 mph or less if they are

at least 10 metres (32 feet) away from any junction, close to the kerb and facing in the direction of the traffic flow in a recognised parking place or lay-by.

Other vehicles and trailers, and all vehicles with projecting loads, MUST NOT be left on a road at night without lights.

Law RVLR reg 24

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Thanks for the replies.

 

I only leave it outside overnight if i'm going away the next day and i've just picked it up from the storage yard,or have just returned from a trip (like tonight) and will be returning it to storage in the morning.

 

I might try to rig up a spare battery and connect the side lights at night for those odd occasions when it is outside.

 

Has anyone ever done this?

 

Ned

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Many years ago before the law was changed ALL vehicles had to be lit at night!

 

To facilitate this you used to be able to buy 'mini' lamps with white forward and red backwards domes that could be clipped onto the vehicle in a convenient place then run the very long wires to the battery and clip them on (no cigar lighters in those days or at least most vehicles had none) the bulbs were very low wattage but they complied with the law - I feel sure that this arrangement must still be legal as long as the light is strong enough.

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224: Cars, goods vehicles not exceeding 1525kg unladen

Surely this is outdated? This officially means that my car - the majority of towcars on this forum - need to be lit at night.

Cheers

James

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