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danb

Swift Challenger Truma Ultraheat

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Hi all, i'm a newbie to caravanning and would like to use all of your experiences to rectify a few problems in our recently purchased 'van.

 

So here is the first issue. ....

 

It has a Truma Ultraheat gas/electric heating system. But the only time it comes on is when its on full and then doesn't turn off when up to temp. So when I put the thermostat to 9, I can hear the click coming from the system, then it comes on. So our first night got a little hot!!! Our next night I put it on 500kw and left it ticking over with the fan on 1, which woked. But I know it should be on 2000kw when on mains?, which we were. I have not yet tried it on gas, as I want to get it serviced before hand, when my finances allow, for safety reasons obviously. I have been advised it could be either one of the thermostats on the fire itself, which tell the fire when to turn on or off. He said they are only £7 ish each and isnt a bad job to do. How accurate could this be??

 

Another question is, not related to the above issue, on the top of the fire I have the 1-10 for the Gas and the the speed settings for the fan speed and then underneath that a sliding switch. This I dont fully understand. Im guessing the 'A' is for Auto? If so, is that to regulate the fan speed in regards to the current temp, ie it goes off when the temp is reached?? As for the other one to the left, it doesnt seem to be any different to having it on 'A'?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Danny

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You are correct in that the A is for auto operation of the fan,the other setting is for manual fan operation,we use that setting in the summer sometimes just to circulate air round the van (heater off).

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It seems amazing to me that the same problems that first surfaced in the very early 2000's are still happening today! but my overview below should clear up some of your questions

 

. ......................................

 

The Ultraheat’s wattage settings are there so you can make use of low amperage hookups, ideally 500W for 6A, 1000W for 10A and 2000W for 16A hookups, their not there to adjust the temperature of the van.

(You could of course use 6A for 1000W and 10A for 2000W, however you will be very limited on what else you can use at the same time, remembering to switch down or off while boiling a kettle can help get the best use out of low amperage hook up’s)

 

 

The Ultraheat is thermostatically controlled, therefore the wattage used will simply mean the fire is heating for shorter or longer periods. Where the problems arise then is if the temperature control is not working correctly, this is often due to the heat from the elements directly affecting the sensor itself,. The sensor is within the control switch, depending then where the switch is installed, this means the heat of the fire can bring the temperature sensor up to that set on the dial directly and the elements switch off, you and the van are still cold but the sensors toasty and takes forever to cool before switching the fire back on!!

A few common bad places to find the switch are in the side of the wardrobe above the fire or in a bed box where blown air pipes run, or perhaps even behind where the TV sits so the heat from the back of the TV or it’s transformer warms it up!

 

Due to this and particularly overnight, it's become something of an urban myth to set it at 500w or 1000w, this or that number on the dial and fan speed setting. In truth what's happening is the available heat is not capable of reaching the set temperature so never switches off, it's a useful work around but not how it should work.

The real solution is to fit a ‘remote’ temperature sensor and attach it to the gas fires sensor, if a remote is already fitted, it to will usually react better if moved to this location.

 

Setting the fan on manual speed means the fan runs at this speed regardless of the amount of heat being produced, I would suggest manual fan is only for use without heat for cooling in summer, if infact it has a use?!

Setting the fan to ‘A’utomatic allows the heat produced to control the fan speed ‘up’ to the speed set on the dial, you can then, keep this set maximum low and therefore quiet, overnight perhaps?

Automatic means the fan will run slowly initially and speed up as the air passing through gets warmer, doing it this way allows heat and fan to be switched on together and doing away with waiting xx minutes as often suggested.

 

I would suggest as a start and during the day, the wattage selected is as high as the hook up allows and then fan speed set to maximum on Automatic.

This provides the maximum heat if required and the fans speed will respond to change in temperature, ie, fast when heat cycle is on and slow when heat is off.

After that you can fine tune to suit your own needs

 

Other heating problems concern the control board, the elements are switched on and off by relays and the contacts burn out, particularly the two 1kw relays. If this happens you may think you have it set to 2kw but only one element is working, finally perhaps leaving you with just 500w working when both 2kw and1kw settings no longer work.

(Note, relays will still be heard to ‘click’ but unless you have heat, their not working)

The 12v for control also comes from this board and the transformer sometimes packs up, apart from no heat, you will lose the green light in the switch if this happens

Also if no heat is forth coming, there are two safety thermostats which switch the power to the elements off if things to hot. The lower one set at 125C will automatically reset after cooling, the higher 175C stat will hold itself off until power is removed, you must then switch off the mains supply to the heater and then it will reset automatically after a few minutes when power can be restored.

The lower 125C stat can fail when hot but well before it’s set temperature, this will mimic a relay fault and the heating switch off before the set temperature on the dial is reached. However checking the stat for continuity when cold will show a perfect reading, only way to be sure is to change it.

 

Note; if either thermostat is faulty it won't be able to reset, if faulty it can sometimes show itself by the vans main RCD tripping, but not always.

 

Finally, the mains isolation ‘fused switch spur’ can loose it’s connection through the built in fuse, the fuse is not the problem but the fuse holders connections that seem to be the problem

 

The main control switch itself seems generally reliable but the odd one does fail, the fan control switch when set to ‘A’ should make a positive connection and not switch on and off at the merest touch.

 

The numbers on the dial represent roughly 4degs and 9 is 32degs or thereabouts, this in theory makes 6 or 7 'normal' but it's what feels comfortable that matters not the number.

 

Other problems not caused by the heater itself are long runs of un-insulated blown air pipe running outside under the floor, insulating this will improve matters considerable.

The kitchen cabinet is often fitted over a wheel arch, much larger than required holes for clearance over the arch are used, the resultant heavy draught coming from behind the fridge can be eliminated by simply sealing the gap on the fridge side of the centre

cupboard.

Any draughts coming from the front of the fridge should also be eliminated.

Fix bed models very often have large floor vents under the bed, these are only useful in storgage and are easily block with a towel while the vans in use,

 

It’s also known for blown air outlets to blow toward the fire and this will upset the temperature control, adjusting these to blow away or even blocking off completely can actually improve overall heating.

 

 

Everything installed and working as it should, there is no good reason why the electric heating should not work very well and keep an even temperature to suit your needs.

 

However, it must be remembered the van needs to be warmed through thoroughly, (not just the air), before the heating is turned down. While the vans cold it will constantly drag heat from the air and this in turn needs constant topping up or the van will always feel ‘draughty’. It's most useful then while particularly cold to use gas as well for the first couple of hours, also, if the heating is off during the day to turn it back on at the first sign of a chill.

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Here is where my controls are, I would imagine far enough away from the fire??

 

What now?

 

Danny

post-61834-0-84182100-1371755808_thumb.jpg

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Just to add to the above, when I had it on 500kw, I obviously still got heat, albeit not as warm, so that is working. Also, the green light comes on too.

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It seems amazing to me that the same problems that first surfaced in the very early 2000's are still happening today! but my overview below should clear up some of your questions

 

. ......................................

 

The Ultraheat’s wattage settings are there so you can make use of low amperage hookups, ideally 500W for 6A, 1000W for 10A and 2000W for 16A hookups, their not there to adjust the temperature of the van.

(You could of course use 6A for 1000W and 10A for 2000W, however you will be very limited on what else you can use at the same time, remembering to switch down or off while boiling a kettle can help get the best use out of low amperage hook up’s)

 

 

The Ultraheat is thermostatically controlled, therefore the wattage used will simply mean the fire is heating for shorter or longer periods. Where the problems arise then is if the temperature control is not working correctly, this is often due to the heat from the elements directly affecting the sensor itself,. The sensor is within the control switch, depending then where the switch is installed, this means the heat of the fire can bring the temperature sensor up to that set on the dial directly and the elements switch off, you and the van are still cold but the sensors toasty and takes forever to cool before switching the fire back on!!

A few common bad places to find the switch are in the side of the wardrobe above the fire or in a bed box where blown air pipes run, or perhaps even behind where the TV sits so the heat from the back of the TV or it’s transformer warms it up!

 

Due to this and particularly overnight, it's become something of an urban myth to set it at 500w or 1000w, this or that number on the dial and fan speed setting. In truth what's happening is the available heat is not capable of reaching the set temperature so never switches off, it's a useful work around but not how it should work.

The real solution is to fit a ‘remote’ temperature sensor and attach it to the gas fires sensor, if a remote is already fitted, it to will usually react better if moved to this location.

 

Setting the fan on manual speed means the fan runs at this speed regardless of the amount of heat being produced, I would suggest manual fan is only for use without heat for cooling in summer, if infact it has a use?!

Setting the fan to ‘A’utomatic allows the heat produced to control the fan speed ‘up’ to the speed set on the dial, you can then, keep this set maximum low and therefore quiet, overnight perhaps?

Automatic means the fan will run slowly initially and speed up as the air passing through gets warmer, doing it this way allows heat and fan to be switched on together and doing away with waiting xx minutes as often suggested.

 

I would suggest as a start and during the day, the wattage selected is as high as the hook up allows and then fan speed set to maximum on Automatic.

This provides the maximum heat if required and the fans speed will respond to change in temperature, ie, fast when heat cycle is on and slow when heat is off.

After that you can fine tune to suit your own needs

 

Other heating problems concern the control board, the elements are switched on and off by relays and the contacts burn out, particularly the two 1kw relays. If this happens you may think you have it set to 2kw but only one element is working, finally perhaps leaving you with just 500w working when both 2kw and1kw settings no longer work.

(Note, relays will still be heard to ‘click’ but unless you have heat, their not working)

The 12v for control also comes from this board and the transformer sometimes packs up, apart from no heat, you will lose the green light in the switch if this happens

Also if no heat is forth coming, there are two safety thermostats which switch the power to the elements off if things to hot. The lower one set at 125C will automatically reset after cooling, the higher 175C stat will hold itself off until power is removed, you must then switch off the mains supply to the heater and then it will reset automatically after a few minutes when power can be restored.

The lower 125C stat can fail when hot but well before it’s set temperature, this will mimic a relay fault and the heating switch off before the set temperature on the dial is reached. However checking the stat for continuity when cold will show a perfect reading, only way to be sure is to change it.

 

Note; if either thermostat is faulty it won't be able to reset, if faulty it can sometimes show itself by the vans main RCD tripping, but not always.

 

Finally, the mains isolation ‘fused switch spur’ can loose it’s connection through the built in fuse, the fuse is not the problem but the fuse holders connections that seem to be the problem

 

The main control switch itself seems generally reliable but the odd one does fail, the fan control switch when set to ‘A’ should make a positive connection and not switch on and off at the merest touch.

 

The numbers on the dial represent roughly 4degs and 9 is 32degs or thereabouts, this in theory makes 6 or 7 'normal' but it's what feels comfortable that matters not the number.

 

Other problems not caused by the heater itself are long runs of un-insulated blown air pipe running outside under the floor, insulating this will improve matters considerable.

The kitchen cabinet is often fitted over a wheel arch, much larger than required holes for clearance over the arch are used, the resultant heavy draught coming from behind the fridge can be eliminated by simply sealing the gap on the fridge side of the centre

cupboard.

Any draughts coming from the front of the fridge should also be eliminated.

Fix bed models very often have large floor vents under the bed, these are only useful in storgage and are easily block with a towel while the vans in use,

 

It’s also known for blown air outlets to blow toward the fire and this will upset the temperature control, adjusting these to blow away or even blocking off completely can actually improve overall heating.

 

 

Everything installed and working as it should, there is no good reason why the electric heating should not work very well and keep an even temperature to suit your needs.

 

However, it must be remembered the van needs to be warmed through thoroughly, (not just the air), before the heating is turned down. While the vans cold it will constantly drag heat from the air and this in turn needs constant topping up or the van will always feel ‘draughty’. It's most useful then while particularly cold to use gas as well for the first couple of hours, also, if the heating is off during the day to turn it back on at the first sign of a chill.

Wow that was a very comprehensive reply, I assume you haven't had a drink tonight Gary! I've had 1 or 2 glasses of wine & found it hard going.

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Wow that was a very comprehensive reply, I assume you haven't had a drink tonight Gary! I've had 1 or 2 glasses of wine & found it hard going.

 

You don't really think I sat and wrote that lot last night?.... I'd downed 3 Singha beers by that time if it was anything like tonight!

 

. ................................

 

Danny, what normally sits on that top in front of the control switch?... think about it?

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The tv of course :-) but then, it's not on at night :-/ it only comes on when I select '9' and then it was baking in the night, as it was on full.

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Yes and the area around the TV is a heat trap shielded from the cooler air at floor level, you need a remote thermostat so the control reads this lower temperature at floor level and responds accordingly.

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I totally understand the concept of moving the thermostat, but why is it only coming on when set to 9 and why is it not going off?

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Reading through your post, you say it only turns on at 9 and then won't switch off automatically, but you don't mention if it's turning off if you turn the thermostat down?

9 then is 32C+ so quite possible it won't switch off

 

There is a rare condition where one of the relays fails shut so constant heat on that setting regardless of switch position or temperature set, not sure it's this though unless you cannot turn it off at all?

However, quick check is to set to nine and then switch on and off, 500, 1000 and 2000 in turn, if ones stuck you won't hear it click either on, or off again. Clicking sound coming from control board behind the fire.

 

To be honest, I can normally understand enough from what's said to fill in the gaps but I'm struggling here, there seems to be more missing than there!

 

BTW, the two thermostats you originally mentioned as being told possibly at fault, do not control room temperature, only the the chance of the fire overheating if gas and electric is used together

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Sorry if I ain't making much sense :-/

 

Just to confirm, it only comes on when on setting '9' and then doesn't seem to shut off. When on any other setting, nothing happens.

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So when I put the thermostat to 9, I can hear the click coming from the system, then it comes on. So our first night got a little hot!!! Our next night I put it on 500kw and left it ticking over with the fan on 1, which worked. But I know it should be on 2000kw when on mains?,

 

 

 

 

It seems to be working on 500w but this is probably because it cannot produce enough heat to need to switch off? even so by turning the temperature dial down to zero it should switch off?

 

Apart from that, all the talk is about a problem with the 2kw setting but no mention of the 1000kw setting? As I said, run through the three kw settings and hear if it's clicking on an off, or not, using the temperature dial and on all kw settings.

 

What I'm getting at is the three kw settings have a relay each, on 500w one relay, on 1000w, again one relay, then on 2000w two 1000w relays switch on one after the other as the setting is moved from 1000w to 2000w

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Ahhh, I see. I will see how it plays out in a few week, when we next go away. Thanks for your time Gaz, it's really appreciated :-)

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Was interested to read these posts, and wonder if anyone can give me advice on my heating. We also have Truma Ultraheat in our Challenger. If we put the thermostat on 7 and the blow heat on manual, the bathroom gets warm, but the air into the lounge and bedroom stays cold. If we take it off manual and A and use it as a convector, we get heat, but not much. Last night we tried it on 1000 and 2000, various heat settings and both on manual and automatic - and we were frozen.

 

What could have gone wrong to stop it blowing hot air around the van ?

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John, for the minute and for testing, forget the fan and leave that off.

 

Now switch heating to 500w and number 9 on the dial, you should now get warm air from the fire grill.

Satisfy yourself how hot this is and then turn up to 1000w, effectively the heat output should double and again satisfy yourself this is the case.

Finally set to 2000w and yet again expect heat to double and by now be pretty suffocating in front of the fire!

 

Then come back with the results

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I've got a Truma Ultraheat s3002 in my Lunar Zenith and it's playing up. From the many forum threads on the web I can see this unit has many problems - but mine is a little different.

 

Gas is fine. The blower is fine. The electric heater is not. Once or twice last season it would not come on - I put it down to some sort of thermal cut out and thought nothing of it. Having just collected the caravan from storage we put the heating on 500 overnight and at some put in the night it cut out. The green light on the wattage/temp setting dial was off. All the caravan fuses are OK (in the main fuse box) and there is no evidence of an inline fuse (that we can see) or remote temp sensor. We could not get the heating to come on after this on any of the power settings (500/1000/2000). We tripped the circuit breaker, turned off the electric feed to the fan in the hope that might help, which I didn't.

 

I switched the circuit breaker for the heat off this morning and popped the cover off the heater to have a look in side. I put the cover back on as the electrics look to be behind the gas burner. I left the circuit breaker off all day. Tonight the thing came one once we switched the breaker back on.

Any ideas what this might be? Not looking forward to a cold weekend away if it is playing up. Most of the other threads with faults report that the green light is still on.

 

Cheers for any pointers.

 

Mike

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Sorry missed this Mike and don't know if you have yet found a solution elsewhere? however, answer is 99% certain the transformer on the main control board has blown.

This supplies low voltage to power the control switch and that green light, so if 240v is reaching the main control board behind the fire, absent of the green light is generally a dead give away.

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Hiya, does anyone know where fuses are in a Swift charisma 2008 ? Don't mean circuit breakers, need fuse for Truma fan.

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Wow, this thread seems to cover my current heating problem so I'll just resurrect it.

 

The truma heater in my 2010 swift has started cutting off after a while when on the 2000 setting. The green ring is still lit up but no heat and no clicking when turning the thermostat dial.

Knocking the power off for a while and turning it down to 1000 and it stays on all night.

I did think I was the two safety cut off switches mentioned elsewhere, but after reading arc's detailed post, I'm now not sure.

Any input much appreciated.

 

Phil.

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On 19/06/2013 at 23:12, Arc Systems said:

It seems amazing to me that the same problems that first surfaced in the very early 2000's are still happening today! but my overview below should clear up some of your questions

 

. ......................................

 

The Ultraheat’s wattage settings are there so you can make use of low amperage hookups, ideally 500W for 6A, 1000W for 10A and 2000W for 16A hookups, their not there to adjust the temperature of the van.

(You could of course use 6A for 1000W and 10A for 2000W, however you will be very limited on what else you can use at the same time, remembering to switch down or off while boiling a kettle can help get the best use out of low amperage hook up’s)

 

 

The Ultraheat is thermostatically controlled, therefore the wattage used will simply mean the fire is heating for shorter or longer periods. Where the problems arise then is if the temperature control is not working correctly, this is often due to the heat from the elements directly affecting the sensor itself,. The sensor is within the control switch, depending then where the switch is installed, this means the heat of the fire can bring the temperature sensor up to that set on the dial directly and the elements switch off, you and the van are still cold but the sensors toasty and takes forever to cool before switching the fire back on!!

A few common bad places to find the switch are in the side of the wardrobe above the fire or in a bed box where blown air pipes run, or perhaps even behind where the TV sits so the heat from the back of the TV or it’s transformer warms it up!

 

Due to this and particularly overnight, it's become something of an urban myth to set it at 500w or 1000w, this or that number on the dial and fan speed setting. In truth what's happening is the available heat is not capable of reaching the set temperature so never switches off, it's a useful work around but not how it should work.

The real solution is to fit a ‘remote’ temperature sensor and attach it to the gas fires sensor, if a remote is already fitted, it to will usually react better if moved to this location.

 

Setting the fan on manual speed means the fan runs at this speed regardless of the amount of heat being produced, I would suggest manual fan is only for use without heat for cooling in summer, if infact it has a use?!

Setting the fan to ‘A’utomatic allows the heat produced to control the fan speed ‘up’ to the speed set on the dial, you can then, keep this set maximum low and therefore quiet, overnight perhaps?

Automatic means the fan will run slowly initially and speed up as the air passing through gets warmer, doing it this way allows heat and fan to be switched on together and doing away with waiting xx minutes as often suggested.

 

I would suggest as a start and during the day, the wattage selected is as high as the hook up allows and then fan speed set to maximum on Automatic.

This provides the maximum heat if required and the fans speed will respond to change in temperature, ie, fast when heat cycle is on and slow when heat is off.

After that you can fine tune to suit your own needs

 

Other heating problems concern the control board, the elements are switched on and off by relays and the contacts burn out, particularly the two 1kw relays. If this happens you may think you have it set to 2kw but only one element is working, finally perhaps leaving you with just 500w working when both 2kw and1kw settings no longer work.

(Note, relays will still be heard to ‘click’ but unless you have heat, their not working)

The 12v for control also comes from this board and the transformer sometimes packs up, apart from no heat, you will lose the green light in the switch if this happens

Also if no heat is forth coming, there are two safety thermostats which switch the power to the elements off if things to hot. The lower one set at 125C will automatically reset after cooling, the higher 175C stat will hold itself off until power is removed, you must then switch off the mains supply to the heater and then it will reset automatically after a few minutes when power can be restored.

The lower 125C stat can fail when hot but well before it’s set temperature, this will mimic a relay fault and the heating switch off before the set temperature on the dial is reached. However checking the stat for continuity when cold will show a perfect reading, only way to be sure is to change it.

 

Note; if either thermostat is faulty it won't be able to reset, if faulty it can sometimes show itself by the vans main RCD tripping, but not always.

 

Finally, the mains isolation ‘fused switch spur’ can loose it’s connection through the built in fuse, the fuse is not the problem but the fuse holders connections that seem to be the problem

 

The main control switch itself seems generally reliable but the odd one does fail, the fan control switch when set to ‘A’ should make a positive connection and not switch on and off at the merest touch.

 

The numbers on the dial represent roughly 4degs and 9 is 32degs or thereabouts, this in theory makes 6 or 7 'normal' but it's what feels comfortable that matters not the number.

 

Other problems not caused by the heater itself are long runs of un-insulated blown air pipe running outside under the floor, insulating this will improve matters considerable.

The kitchen cabinet is often fitted over a wheel arch, much larger than required holes for clearance over the arch are used, the resultant heavy draught coming from behind the fridge can be eliminated by simply sealing the gap on the fridge side of the centre

cupboard.

Any draughts coming from the front of the fridge should also be eliminated.

Fix bed models very often have large floor vents under the bed, these are only useful in storgage and are easily block with a towel while the vans in use,

 

It’s also known for blown air outlets to blow toward the fire and this will upset the temperature control, adjusting these to blow away or even blocking off completely can actually improve overall heating.

 

 

Everything installed and working as it should, there is no good reason why the electric heating should not work very well and keep an even temperature to suit your needs.

 

However, it must be remembered the van needs to be warmed through thoroughly, (not just the air), before the heating is turned down. While the vans cold it will constantly drag heat from the air and this in turn needs constant topping up or the van will always feel ‘draughty’. It's most useful then while particularly cold to use gas as well for the first couple of hours, also, if the heating is off during the day to turn it back on at the first sign of a chill.

You have answered some of my problems regarding my S3002 fire, thank you. Except my "click" is a "clonk".Regarding the fridge draught, ours is as if a fan is doing it, so will take steps to eliminate this . This draught has been facing the Ultraheat thermo stat on cabinet opposit

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You have answered some of my problems regarding my S3002 fire, thank you. Except my "click" is a "clonk".Regarding the fridge draught, ours is as if a fan is doing it, so will take steps to eliminate this . This draught has been facing the Ultraheat thermo stat on cabinet opposit

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Thanks to Gary at arcsystems for his post, it has solved the problems on the heating in our van.

Thanks very much much appreciàted.

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Hi all. Im still miffed with this UltraHeat system too 🤯

we have a 2010 Lunar Ultima.  

 

I can feel the heat at the fire front, which for me is comfy (but hubby is a cold wuss)..... but the heat doesn't seem to travel to the back of the van were the beds are.  Im assuming I need to use the ‘hot air ducts’ for this?? But when i select the A or the curl-shape logo on the rhs dial of my fire  it just blows cold. Do i need to fire up the actual fire using the lhs dial ( 1-10) to implement the hot air to blow freely through the whole van?

 

photo is my ultraheat/fire x

 

188BE235-EC7B-41B6-89BE-59878A1CC08B.jpeg

Edited by montymal53

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It should all be detailed in the caravan handbook.

 

The Truma heater is basically a gas heater and can be fitted with the Ultraheat electric option which Truma suggest is 'supplementary' to the gas operation. You can operate both gas and electric at the same time. However I've often used the electric element on its own and it can produce a goodly amount of heat.

 

The numbers round the dial are thermostat settings and if I recall Truma suggest 4 or 5 as being a comfortable level of heat. In the picture the heating elements are switched off and there are three different heat settings that bring into operation more and more of the heating element. These are labelled 500, 1000 and 2000 and are selected by the outer ring.

 

The left knob on the heater itself is the gas control and the numbers are a form of thermostat. The right hand controls the fan speed. Use of the fan will send virtually all the heat generated down the distributive trunking and little, if any will come from the front of the heater. The trunking has to heat up initially, so it can take a while for warmth to appear, especially at the end of a long trunking run. The fan needs to be working at a fair click in order to overcome the drag of the trunking walls etc. At low fan settings at the far end of the van you quite often can't feel any air movement from the ducts.

 

There are three settings for the fan operation. 'Off' is the middle position and that needs to be checked when storing the van, as at low fan speeds it can't be heard and it could continue to run 'til it flattens the battery. The other two slider positions are one where the fan runs all the time at the speed you've selected and the other varies the speed dependant on closeness to the thermostat setting, with the maximum speed being the fan speed you've selected. So if the van is stone cold the fan will run at the speed you selected but as it warms up the speed will reduce. Trouble is I can never remember which of those two settings are which.

 

The ducts have movable flaps and these should be adjusted to encourage warm air to go right to the end of a trunking run. If you leave the ducts near the heater fully open all the warm air will spill out and hardly any will go further up the trunking. So close the nearest ones up a fair bit and more air will run to the ends, which can be left fully open to encourage as much warmth as possible.

 

HTH    

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