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Tamar 542 Dt Noseweight Question

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I have ordered a new 542 Tamar and I have a Touran 2. 0 TDi sport. I will have a motor mover transferred to the Tamar and am concerned about whether I will be able to get the noseweight down to the 75g max of the Touran.

Any views ir help would be gratefully received.

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Archiving a 75 Kg nose weight will not be a problem for you. Think of your caravan as a set of balance scales with its balance point being the axle.

 

Simply place the loose items you normally keep in the caravan on the opposite side of the axle to the heavy side, but try to keep them as low and as close to the axle itself as you can. You will soon achieve 75Kg or any other weight that you desire.

 

Simples. :)

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Only briefly checked our 2011 model DT with a hitch mounted gauge so probably not as accurate as many but with spare wheel and half full gas and a couple of lightish bits in locker and only lightly loaded inside with maybe a couple of recliner chairs (4kg each) on bottom bunk it was around the 80/85kg mark. Without spare wheel in front it would be easily achievable I think.

 

Thankfully our tow ball/car are both 90kg rated so not such an issue

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Thanks for your replies - very reassuring.

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Adria have confirmed to me (having reverted to the factory) that the ex works noseweight of my 2009 542DK is 85 kg. That's empty - no battery, spare wheel or gas cylinder. On my van adding a battery will increase the noseweight by approx 15 kg and a lightweight gas cylinder by say 6 kg - so already its over the Alko chassis max of 100 kg.

 

It seems to me that getting down to 75 kg (the noseweight limit on my Touran) is not that straightforward - as if you aren't removing weight from the front of the van you need a lot of weight behind the axle (and at some distance). Putting weight just behind the axle isn't enough unless its huge - bear in mind that a motor mover weighing approx 40 kg installed just in front of the axle only adds, I believe, approx 3 kg to noseweight.

 

In my van placing the spare wheel (17 kg) in the locker (approx 2. 8m in front of the axle) adds approx 12 kg to noseweight. Starting from the position of it not being in the locker it would have to placed 2. 8m behind the axle to reduce the noseweight by the same amount. That's against the rear wall of the van. Moving it forward to 1. 4 m behind the axle will half the reduction in noseweight (ie 6kg). To maintain the 12 kg reduction at 1. 4m back you need 34 kg - to achieve a 24 kg reduction, 68 kg. These are rough numbers to demonstrate the point- I'm am sure others will correct me if I've got the basic principle wrong - I don't think I have.

 

I don't know how much weight and at what distance behind the axle adversely affects stability - or the safety implications of exceeding the car noseweight limit by say 10 - 15 kg. The outfit hasn't felt unstable being towed at probably approx 100 kg noseweight - but I suspect you only find out there is a problem in unusual circumstances - and that damage to the car only becomes apparent over time.

 

I bought privately but in your circumstances I would press the dealer to confirm the ex works noseweight of your van (it took me a while to get this information) and get him to demonstrate how the noseweight can be safely reduced to 75 kg.

 

It seems to me that excessive ex works noseweight isn't confined to Adria and that the industry should make specifying ex works noseweight compulsory - so that suitability of the towcar can be easily assessed at the outset. At present it is far too easy to find out after purchasing a van that, whilst the outfit is well within limits in terms of max van weight, car kerbweight and gross trainweight (and is shown as a good match on towcar matching sites), it is difficult (maybe impossible) to safely keep within the car noseweight limit.

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It seems to me that excessive ex works noseweight isn't confined to Adria and that the industry should make specifying ex works noseweight compulsory - so that suitability of the towcar can be easily assessed at the outset.

 

Such information is not going to be of much use to the owner once things like motor mover, spare wheel, gas bottles, etc. have been fitted or stored. I can't see much point in making details of ex-works noseweight compulsory because the ex-works condition is not going to remain for long. It's the owner's responsibility to adjust the noseweight to suit.

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Such information is not going to be of much use to the owner once things like motor mover, spare wheel, gas bottles, etc. have been fitted or stored. I can't see much point in making details of ex-works noseweight compulsory because the ex-works condition is not going to remain for long. It's the owner's responsibility to adjust the noseweight to suit.

However if it came in at 120kg unladen I might have some concerns. Also if towing for a service it will usually be unladen except for battery perhaps.

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Such information is not going to be of much use to the owner once things like motor mover, spare wheel, gas bottles, etc. have been fitted or stored. I can't see much point in making details of ex-works noseweight compulsory because the ex-works condition is not going to remain for long. It's the owner's responsibility to adjust the noseweight to suit.

Not perfect I agree - but it would draw attention to the issue and put the purchaser (and perhaps dealer) on notice of it being an important factor to consider. A better solution would be to explicitly include the major items of usual equipment such as a gas bottle, battery and spare wheel in the stated noseweight figure.

If the stated ex works noseweight of a van is say 85kg, (or including the items listed above say 95kg+) the chassis max 100 kg and the proposed towcar 75 kg, it seems to me the purchaser should have sufficient information prior to purchase,to know that there may well a problem.

Many have stated that reducing noseweight is simply a matter of adding weight behind the axle, keeping that weight low and as close to the axle as possible. In practice, if you are faced with having to reduce noseweight by 20 kg + , and cannot move equipment from the front of the van, my experience so far suggests that it isn't straight forward. The amount of weight close to the axle is either impractically large or the distance that a reduced weight (but still over 60kg) has to be positioned behind the axle gives me concerns about stability. The only possible solution I have at the moment is to move the battery to behind the axle whilst travelling and to fit shock absorbers to reduce potential pitching.

It may be this should be moved to the 542DK or another general noseweight thread.

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If the stated ex works noseweight of a van is say 85kg, (or including the items listed above say 95kg+) the chassis max 100 kg and the proposed towcar 75 kg, it seems to me the purchaser should have sufficient information prior to purchase,to know that there may well a problem.

 

It's not a problem that's difficult to solve though. When I picked up my caravan from the dealer it was the other way round. It had next to no noseweight. The dealer offered to add some ballast up front to get me home safely where I later added the gas bottles, spare wheel and various other items in the front locker and all was well again.

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I am of the opinion that the noseweight should start off in a realistic area. After all the van is going to be towed empty at some time. Thankfully none of the 'vans that I have had had been a problem. For example - with a MIRO of 1250kg excluding water the unladen noseweight should at least fall between 50kg and 100kg ex works.

 

From memory my present van was about 65kg when I collected it. This was with battery and motor mover in front of the wheels. Fortunately when laden there is no problem as it falls at around 85kg.

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It's not a problem that's difficult to solve though. When I picked up my caravan from the dealer it was the other way round. It had next to no noseweight. The dealer offered to add some ballast up front to get me home safely where I later added the gas bottles, spare wheel and various other items in the front locker and all was well again.

Yes - but you're missing the point.

Increasing the noseweight of a van which is relatively low ex works is easy - items such as spare wheels, batteries and gas bottles are typically placed a long way ahead of the axle and if necessary other items can also be placed at some distance ahead of the axle without having to worry about creating unstable van.

Substantially reducing the noseweight of a van which is heavy ex works is much more difficult. Items like batteries, gas bottles etc make the starting point worse. The amount of weight that needs to be placed close behind the axle to achieve the required reduction can be impractical and the distance behind the axle you can safely place a reduced weight (which can still be substantial) is constrained by the possibility of creating an unstable van.

Put another way - do you think that 68 kg (the equivalent of 4 spare wheels) placed roughly 1. 4m behind the axle (that's approx half way between the axle and the back of the van) will create an unstable outfit? This would get me to approx 75 kg noseweight (the towcar max). The max weight of the van is approx 85% of the car's kerbweight.

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do you think that 68 kg (the equivalent of 4 spare wheels) placed roughly 1. 4m behind the axle (that's approx half way between the axle and the back of the van) will create an unstable outfit? This would get me to approx 75 kg noseweight (the towcar max). The max weight of the van is approx 85% of the car's kerbweight.

 

Difficult to say whether it would create a potentially unstable outfit because other factors also play a role. Enough owners seem to get by with bicycle racks on the back of their caravan without a problem so one cannot generalise. Indeed, some caravan manufacturers even supply details of where on the body structure holes can be drilled to attach a bicycle rack on the back panel, so obviously they are obviously satisfied that it doesn't constitute a problem. Adria even produce at least one model with two on board water tanks, one at the front and the other at the rear, for the specific purpose of trimming the noseweight with water ballast.

Edited by Lutz

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