Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Steamdrivenandy

A New Van For The Same Overall Cost As A 7 Year Old?

Recommended Posts

Guest jks

 

If the costing is flawed John please tell me where so I can correct it? :)

 

Whilst it may be irrelevant to you it's interesting to me, whereas if I hear another word about damp Bailey mattresses I think I'll scream :unsure:

That's because you haven't got any so you don't need to read it. I only read this because you mentioned a Bailey Rimini and I couldn't see the significance. We will beg to differ :) Edited by jks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bailey knockers are at it again

I'm not knocking Baileys, I'm sure I could make similar points about all UK mass produced vans, it's just that I don't know the figures for the other brands, however their residual value %ages all tend to be the same at whatever age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can make figures say what you want. How do you think the government gets away with it. :unsure:

I did a bit of working out myself and this is what I came up with. I bought a 12 month old Bailey caravan Oct last year the part ex lost me £4100 on my last van but my 'new' van saved me £3100 on the new price and the van looked new. Add in the £910 for insurance and that works out at less than £500 PA which is less than a holiday abroad for 4 people.

Edited by Capricorn12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Andy

must admit that as the new finances have become reality, it's not the same. Towing a Swift with a Civic is good and I'm happy we are still in the game and enjoying our caravaning.

But

I never ever saw another towing with a Merc SL and we loved the individuality of the Eriba. We'll need a few years but well get it all back, need to keep our heads down, work hard and be sensible.

 

2010WarehamForest-04.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read your posts about value for money and you make me feel quite good, We bought our van about a year ago and paid 1. 5k for it and its still worth similar money which makes me happy !! its a 1992 Elddis wisp in excellent condtion. I know my caravan is a million miles away from you but in the real world it does the same thing !!

Absolutely and I hope you treasure and venerate such a beautiful old girl and make sure she's fit and well to carry on even further into the future.

 

I s'pose you wouldn't fancy an Eriba Triton that's just 3 years younger for £7,900 http://www. automotiveleisure. co. uk/page64. html :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I thought you were a sensible girl Shirl :rolleyes:

 

There must be some logic there somewhere but I'm blowed if I can understand why I should cost a new awning that I'd have to buy for a Bailey to my old Eriba that's already got one?

 

Sorry Andy, I think my tongue was in my cheek :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read your posts about value for money and you make me feel quite good, We bought our van about a year ago and paid 1. 5k for it and its still worth similar money which makes me happy !! its a 1992 Elddis wisp in excellent condtion. I know my caravan is a million miles away from you but in the real world it does the same thing !!

I don't think you have taken into account the 2% interst you have lost on your £1,500 caravan - so £1,500 + £15 (2%) = £1,515!

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please bear with my statto tendency here but I've been doing some figuring on van costs. I've used nice round figures where possible.

 

 

But I'm worried that my figures are wrong somewhere.

 

I don't think you have anything particularly wrong, although you might want to look how sensitive your answer is to your assumptions. Say you sell you old one for just a bit less, and the new one costs just a bit more? Say the depreciation is a little bit more than you expect. Your 2% interest rate for an ISA assumes you have no other loans you could repay off first; you may not, but in my case I could pay £XXXX off the mortgage instead so use 4% in my calcs.

 

Even so, if £166 became £266, or even £366, what you have shown is what stunning value owning a caravan is. Caravan depreciate at a much lower rate than many other things we own, cars for example. Based on this you should have a stunning caravan towed behind a shabby old car. I have said to people in the past that they shouldn't worry about the capital outlay, just the cost of money when they try and decide what to buy. I admit they looked at me a bit strangely when I did.

 

The next suggested calculation for the reader is "depreciation per person per night". Currently I am estimating £8 per person per night ( over 3 years for a brand new 6 berth ) which is almost criminal it is such good value!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think you have taken into account the 2% interst you have lost on your £1,500 caravan - so £1,500 + £15 (2%) = £1,515!

Alan

 

Or inflation which is 2. 7% or thereabouts, so your £1500 van from last year is now worth £1459. 50 in last years money and if you'd invested the money at 2% you'd have got £30, so overall you've lost the equivalent of £70. 50 on your £1,500 purchase, but hey! it's only money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm fairly confident on the prices for both new and used values, providing the market remains stable of course. The odd few hundred either way won't make too much difference to the overall results. In my case the mortgage has long gone, thank goodness and we only have one small interest free loan outstanding, so nothing that's worth paying down.

 

Taking up MikeRs 'depreciation per person per night' challenge and using my earlier suppositions and as we normally use our 3 berth van with only 2 berths occupied, then on a new Eriba Troll 540 at £21,000 reducing to £16,000 over 3 years we're talking £5000/316 person nights = £15. 82 per man/night.

 

Our current 540 on the same basis would be £3,000/316 = £9. 49 per man/night

 

And at the risk of setting off the Defenders of Bailey all over again the same calculation for the Rimini would be £6,000/316 = £18. 98 per man/night.

 

Of course add in an extra person or persons occasionally and/or increase the average number of nights away and you can get dramatically different figures.

Edited by Steamdrivenandy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Nick, I sold my boat in 2011 and I can't believe how much better off I am - it's everso hard to drink it all

But its damn fun trying. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy - it is a hobby, and yes an expensive one (more than i thought!!). But, we all work hard and for me personally it's the one time I actually get to see my kids being kids, and not either stuck in front of a pc/Nintendo or tv. I work hard through the year being away from home quite a bit or stuck in front of a pc all hours, and the 4 weeks holidays in it plus the odd weekends is like heaven for me.

Back on topic, just do it, you know you want to. If you don't you'll kick yourself. If you do, get the most out of it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Totally agree with sentence 2, but not sure about sentence 1. Is owning a caravan a "hobby" ? I bought mine so that we could go to places without having to bother with B&B, hotels, etc etc. I never bought it so that I could have a hobby, and if anyone asked what my hobbies were the van would not get a mention or even a thought

 

Of course its one of your hobbies or you would not be here on this forum debating the finer points of someone else life choices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sat in one of those eribas at the caravan show last week. it wasn't immediately obvious why they cost so much money either new or second hand. Certainly the one at the show had many untidy corners and poor design features.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is another issue which is worth thinking about. I have had new vans and one gets very precious about them staying as they were when they were delivered. Luck says that soon after buying you get minor dings and scuffs or things break inside and are not perfect. You can get precious and this can spoil the fun,

 

As I have an older van now, 7 years, I tend to be much more relaxed about it and that makes the experience much more pleasant. It has minor dents and another one is neither here nor there.

 

An older van has lower running costs insurance premiums are lower and you tend to go for DIY repairs and pefection in finish isn't such a big deal as when trying to protect your trade in value with a newish van.

 

Also you can reduce servicing costs by a mix of basic chassis services and DIY habitation instead of paying for full services - which aren't really services but checks (another subject entirely) to mentain a manufacturers warrenty.

 

A new van is nice, agreed, but changing them every two years ago is about want you want not a a sensible financial decision. As an earlier poster says buy and keep for 10 years as you avoid the sharp part of the depreciation curve. Damp willing, mid age vans retain residual values well particularly as they are in the middle part of the depreciation curve.

Edited by Fenester

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife thinks I am a bit OCD,but since we got our first caravan 8 years ago (yes, rather late into the hobby) I have kept a spread sheet totalling all our caravan costs and 'Away Days'.

 

Over the past 8 years we have had 265 nights away in our hame from home and this has cost us an average of £134. 09 per night if you dont allow for the residual value of the caravan. With the residual value, it works out at £62. 15 per night (that's assuming a residual value of £10k).

 

This includes ALL costs including fuel, motorway tolls, ferry costs, site fees, servicing, insurance, storage, gas, awnings, chairs, etc, etc. ....

 

Some may say that you can get a decent B&B for that but then you don't get to meet such wonderful, friendly people and have such a great time in your own Home from Home.

 

Not cheap, but worth every penny.

Edited by TonyK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jks

My wife thinks I am a bit OCD,but since we got our first caravan 8 years ago (yes, rather late into the hobby) I have kept a spread sheet totalling all our caravan costs and 'Away Days'.

 

Over the past 8 years we have had 265 nights away in our hame from home and this has cost us an average of £135,89 per night if you dont allow for the residual value of the caravan. With the residual value, it works out at £96. 25 per night.

 

This includes ALL costs including fuel, motorway tolls, ferry costs, site fees, servicing, insurance, storage, gas, awnings, chairs, etc, etc. ....

 

Some may say that you can get a decent B&B for that but then you don't get to meet such wonderful, friendly people and have such a great time in your own Home from Home.

 

Not cheap, but worth every penny.

Have to admire you for keeping all the figures. Isn't life too short? :)

Years ago we had some friends who use to account for the number of times they paid a penny at the public toilets!

Edited by jks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found it quite interesting but deeply flawed by the projected value of the second hand van. 11 grand for a 7 year old with no hot water? You'd buy a new budget van for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sat in one of those eribas at the caravan show last week. it wasn't immediately obvious why they cost so much money either new or second hand. Certainly the one at the show had many untidy corners and poor design features.

One of the reasons why they're expensive is also the reason they last so long and hold their value so well. That's the unique tubular steel frame that shapes the body and from which all the furniture is hung. None of that is visible to the naked eye.

 

I sat in several new ones at the NEC and can say they're an improvement on previous models in a number of areas.

 

Both the central cabinet and the kitchen cupboard doors are now split into two doors which means less space used when open and less stress on hinges from wide single doors.

 

They've reinstated a space above the wardrobe which for the past few years has been absent.

 

They've completely redesigned the washroom bringing back the bench Thetford (thank goodness) and removing any vestige of a corner cabinet that meant taller people's right knee had nowhere to go when sitting on the Thetty. The rising mirror is a bit of a gimmick as the previous big fitted one seemed to work OK. They've positioned the light fitting so it partially shines over a tall persons shoulder. Previously the lights were behind the standing Thetty user and cast deep shadow at night. You were literally 'p***ing in the dark'. They've retained most of the extra width of recent years by adding a fillet around one end of the Thetty and cleverly used the space that provides as cubby hole storage accessible from the main van interior. Compared to past efforts it's a revelation.

 

We don't like that they've not brought back the sliding table top on the central cabinet and that the worktop extension is too small and on the wrong side of the kitchen, getting in the way of the main door.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found it quite interesting but deeply flawed by the projected value of the second hand van. 11 grand for a 7 year old with no hot water? You'd buy a new budget van for that.

 

It's not flawed HP, lots of Eribas don't have running hot water, it's not part of the standard Hymer spec, but is an option. It costs about £300 to £400 to install it including new taps and you can buy a shedful of kettles for that price. You do get a Truma S3004 gas heater in the basic spec. though.

 

In the Automotive Leisure Recommended Upgrade Pack you get:

External stowage flap

Flyscreen door

Battery & charger

Intersprung rear cushions

Hitchlock

Combined sink cover & chopping board

Pull out shower hose & curtain

 

Their Deluxe Pack features:

Blown air system

3 burner hob instead of 2 burner

Entrance door rubbish bin

Ultraheat electric heating

Alloys

 

Hot water with an on-board tank is a separate £440 option and there are various other options available too.

 

£11,000 for a 7 year old Troll is a good valuation which I've validated by getting a PX quote yesterday and I reckon a dealer would price the van at £13,000 on their forecourt.

Edited by Steamdrivenandy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without being rude I am afraid the £13000 second hand Eriba would stay on the forcourt a very long time if waiting for me. I never could see what the attraction is apart from undoubted quality and being able to be towed by a small car but fit for purpose!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My new creed "ADVENTURE BEFORE DEMENTIA" Thanks Billy thats made my day! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

My wife thinks I am a bit OCD,but since we got our first caravan 8 years ago (yes, rather late into the hobby) I have kept a spread sheet totalling all our caravan costs and 'Away Days'.

 

Over the past 8 years we have had 265 nights away in our hame from home and this has cost us an average of £134. 09 per night if you dont allow for the residual value of the caravan. With the residual value, it works out at £62. 15 per night (that's assuming a residual value of £10k).

 

This includes ALL costs including fuel, motorway tolls, ferry costs, site fees, servicing, insurance, storage, gas, awnings, chairs, etc, etc. ....

 

Some may say that you can get a decent B&B for that but then you don't get to meet such wonderful, friendly people and have such a great time in your own Home from Home.

 

Not cheap, but worth every penny.

 

I find this very intresting and answer for anyone who tries to say they are getting cheap holidays. My own figures for foreign trips have been fairly consistent at around £52 per night for a 75 night trip and £60 for the 44 night trip. This does not include any of the costs incured while the van stands on the drive: purchase, depreciation servicing,insurance(for the van not travel)or accesories and we do pay for storage.

I have a friend who can stay all inclusive in Spain for 30 a night but would we swop places and spend 3 months with what we could carry in a suitcase of course not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our little Eriba hasn`t even got a loo, we have 2 large dogs so having the awning up is a must. Yes, Eriba`s are very expensive but if we wanted to keep it ours would last us our lifetime. We see our trips as fun and challenging, if we are ever able to leave the dogs with familiy we can be set up and ready for a brew in 10 minutes, no water or toilets to worry about. I know that we do not have all the facilities of the larger caravans but that doesn`t matter to us, we think of our trips as "posh camping". We have loads of fun and after all isn`t that what its about. Touring with Eriba`s is a dream as you can literally turn it round on the road if need be. We were offered more for our little van recently than what it cost us new nearly 4yrs ago so thankfully we don`t feel like its depreciating before our eyes. Its each to their own isn`t it, one day when our arthritis gets even worse we may need a roomier van but for now our Eriba fits the bill. Ellen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe to ease some costs of running this vehicle havbe you fitted solar panels? I am just doing this so I can be a little more remote when I travel. I found this link http://www. sunstore. co. uk/solar-panel-kits-draw/ . They seem like they have good quality 12v solar panels has anyone used them before?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...