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cosworth1

Fitting New Carpet

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Hi all, new to this site but being camping / caravaning for years. I need to change the carpet in my Abbey Spectrum 540 but im a little concerned about a few things, if anyone can help it would be most appreciated.

Do i have to take up all the furniture / fittings ie: bed, chairs, etc. ...

Do i just cut the old carpet as tight to the furniture / fittings as possible.

How do i fit the new carpet under the furniture / fittings

I want this to be a decent job but i cant see how i will do this without having everything lifted. All comments welcome.

 

Thanks,

 

Declan.

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I am also looking to consider this.

 

I don't think I will move all the seating etc.

 

I will probably just cut the old carpet as close to the furniture as possible.

 

Then the seating areas, maybe just try to take any of the screws out, so hat I can just force the seating up a bit, pull out the remaining old pieces, and to push the new carpet edge underneath.

Then screw it back down, hoping the seating grips the new carpet.

 

Don't know about the rest though.

 

Just hope it doesn't end up looking like a pigs ear.

 

A while ago, I think some one used self adhesive tiles, one by one by one.

 

Gra.

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Have you considered making removable carpet sections as found in new 'vans! I guess what's under your carpet as a floor would or would not make that a possibility. Nor am I sure about the costs of binding edges!

 

When I replaced my old carpet in a former 'van I simply cut it as close to the furniture as I could. I used this as a template for the replacement. There are double sides tapes around that will hold the carpet firmly in place and I never even considered trying to lift furniture. I doubt you would get a sinificantly better finish if you did and might cause problems with re-setting your furniture.

 

The only giveaway could be sections of the old carpet inside a locker where the base is raised for ventilation and the carpet overlapped. However, if you are aware of this it's perfectly possible to cut the new to intrude inside the lockers in much the same was as did the original.

 

Good luck.

 

Incidently - I decided to put a piece of cushion floor in front of the cooker/sink and only carpeted the seating/sleeping areas. In my current 'van I've removed carpets completely but that's my choice. The sealed laminate effect floor is so easy to clean and suits us fine.

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I had to replace the fixed carpet in my van a few years ago because the fridge door opened while travelling and a litre of milk went all over the carpet. I took out the old carpet and used it as a template for cutting the new carpet, I was very pleased with the finished job as it looked pretty good and was a better quality carpet!

 

If I was doing it again I would actually look round markets, carpet shops etc. for off cuts that have been properly edged. I have done this for more recent vans I have owned and it is surprising how good a fit you can get both in width and length from these off cuts and no need fix down or cut.

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Hi

 

As daft as it sounds, speak to a local carpet shop - not a caravan specialist etc. My friends had domestic underlay and carpet fitted to their motorhome and are delighted with. It was not cheap compared to "doing a room in a house" but was good value compared to "genuine" motorhome carpets.

 

Russell

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I did this job after I returned home from Spain last March. After four months continous use on a sandy,gritty site, I was not happy with the appearance of the fitted carpet. I decided the way to go was to fit vinyl with a carpet runner down the centre. As luck would have it, I came across a very reasonably priced off cut of good quality vinyl in Leroy Merlin's at Calais on the way home. I carefully cut around all the caravan fittings with a Stanley knife and removed the old carpet in one piece - the end bathroom was dealt with separately. The carpet pieces were used as templates on the vinyl, which in turn was cut. The vinyl needed only slight adjustment to fit neatly. A measured length of stair carpet was bought from ebay, with ends machined for about £32. In the end bathroom, for neatness around the toilet, I loosened off the screws and raised the toilet slightly so that the vinyl went underneath.

 

And now, after two months use in Spain, I'm more than happy with it. With the carpet runner taken outside for a brush down, all the vinyl needs is a wipe over with a damp mop.

Edited by John Douglas

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Hi

 

As daft as it sounds, speak to a local carpet shop - not a caravan specialist etc. My friends had domestic underlay and carpet fitted to their motorhome and are delighted with. It was not cheap compared to "doing a room in a house" but was good value compared to "genuine" motorhome carpets.

 

Russell

 

Scorpion motorhomes were made near us by a friend of mine, he had removable carpets made by a local carpet shop :)

 

and one of the reasons we bought our Elddis was that it came with removable carpets over vinyl flooring

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I am about to fit a new carpet in my van as I spilt stuff on the present one, I have found a carpet offcut at my local carpet store and was going to fit it on top of the present carpet thus forming a sort of underlay, I dont think the opening and closing of the various floor lockers and the fridge, cooker etc will be affected . Justa lot of care is needed cutting with a stanley knife to fit but by no means a super difficult job . Anyone done it ?

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Hi Cosworth1, lots of very good answers! Plenty of choice, and I'm sure you will come

up with something.

Peter, don't entirely agree about leaving your old carpet down. I think you will find that

the new carpet will move about and crease. Also can you open the fridge door with a double

layer down? I can't

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We recarpeted out first van, using an offcut from the mother-in-laws when she had a new one fitted. Just cut the existing one as close to the furniture as possible and used it as a template. We used double sided carpet tape to keep the new one in place.

 

Two tips, put the new carpet down in the livingroom for a week or so - before you cut it to size and walk it in which gets some of the stretch out of it and use plenty of stanley knife blades, change them before they start to snag.

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We had a carpet professionally fitted in a van we bought a few years ago - great job. To have it done now would be a bit expensive as fitters charge a minimum. Still worth it, though. In our current van I fitted carpet tiles from B&Q. One advantage is that you can take back any tiles that you don't use. It looks fine but you can tell that I did it and not a professional. I want to get a Readicut kit and make a carpet to fit but I'm not allowed. It wold be something to do in the van!

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My last van had it's carpet replaced by me. I removed the old and used it as a template to cut a rough size on the garage floor.

I did not have to lift any furniture as it was fitted round it. Held down by staples, it was easy to lift.

 

The new one was an off-cut of Berber which allows a mat to be used on top if you want and it will not gravitate as with most carpets as Berber has no directional pile.

 

The cost of the off-cut was under a tenner. :)

 

Sharp blades in the Stanley are vital.

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Sharp blades in the Stanley are vital.

Still got the scar on my left hand from the time I replaced the carpet in our very first caravan (an old Cotswold Windrush) in the 90s. So do be very careful. !!

 

(Fortunately no blood on the new carpet as I stuffed my hand in my mouth).

 

I used spray adhesive to fix it down all over the plywood floor (after cleaning off the remnants of the old rubber backing from the original carpet) - the carpet was the bri-nylon sort with underlay attached - none of this posh Berber wool stuff ;).

 

@Petercheason: Don't put new carpet on top of old - I tried it once in a bedroom. You'll only have to do it again.

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Still got the scar on my left hand from the time I replaced the carpet in our very first caravan (an old Cotswold Windrush) in the 90s. So do be very careful. !!

 

(Fortunately no blood on the new carpet as I stuffed my hand in my mouth).

 

I used spray adhesive to fix it down all over the plywood floor (after cleaning off the remnants of the old rubber backing from the original carpet) - the carpet was the bri-nylon sort with underlay attached - none of this posh Berber wool stuff ;).

 

@Petercheason: Don't put new carpet on top of old - I tried it once in a bedroom. You'll only have to do it again.

 

I forgot about creep !! good point I have had the carpet up before so its not a problem but a good point well made Thanks for that

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Hi, thanks for all the helpful comments and tips. I will actually be putting down vinyl, is there an insulation barrier that goes between the floor and vinyl.

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Most caravans were and are made from the floor up and the carpet is one of the first things to be fitted. This means that all the furniture is built on top of the carpet, with a protective vinyl covering of course. To fit a new carpet exactly like the original means lifting all the floor mounted furniture and after removing the old carpet, fitting the new carpet then refitting the furniture. This could be managed with things like seat bases but even these will probably have to be unscrewed from the walls otherwise the walls would be stressed by lifting the furniture. The kitchen and wardrobe however are far too complex to unscrew so the best method is to cut the carpet from around the furniture and refit butting up to the furniture. If the furniture has floor level vent holes these can be used to stop the carpet from moving by feeding the carpet into these holes. The only things to watch for is the thickness of the carpet that may cause fridge door or any other low level cupboard door to foul the carpet. Edit: The floors on any caravan more modern than around 1980 has a sandwich floor that is well insulated so no extra insulation is required and also vinyl flooring is quite a good insulation anyway. This will allow loose fit carpets to be fitted later without fouling low level doors.

Edited by Capricorn12

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Or you could go for removable carpets. ...........

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Most caravans were and are made from the floor up and the carpet is one of the first things to be fitted. This means that all the furniture is built on top of the carpet, with a protective vinyl covering of course. To fit a new carpet exactly like the original means lifting all the floor mounted furniture and after removing the old carpet, fitting the new carpet then refitting the furniture. This could be managed with things like seat bases but even these will probably have to be unscrewed from the walls otherwise the walls would be stressed by lifting the furniture. The kitchen and wardrobe however are far too complex to unscrew so the best method is to cut the carpet from around the furniture and refit butting up to the furniture. If the furniture has floor level vent holes these can be used to stop the carpet from moving by feeding the carpet into these holes. The only things to watch for is the thickness of the carpet that may cause fridge door or any other low level cupboard door to foul the carpet. Edit: The floors on any caravan more modern than around 1980 has a sandwich floor that is well insulated so no extra insulation is required and also vinyl flooring is quite a good insulation anyway. This will allow loose fit carpets to be fitted later without fouling low level doors.

 

Be carefully not to block the vents running along the bottom of bed lockers etc, these are to ensure good air circulation throughout the caravan/motorhome.

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We had ours fitted by a local carpet shop they charged £30 for the fitting and they did a really good job. They removed the old one too.

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when we replaced the carpet in our last van, and under the instructions of maggie!!!!!!!, i had a local carpet fitter do it, duralay underlat and gripper strips,it was the best we've ever seen in a van. it was quiet expensive £50 for fitting only but when you look at the small space to work in, number of fiddely cuts etc, we thought it was well worth it. no spilt blood either.

 

pete

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Be carefully not to block the vents running along the bottom of bed lockers etc, these are to ensure good air circulation throughout the caravan/motorhome.

The original carpet would have gone into these holes so the ventilation would stay the same unless thicker carpet was used.

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I took all our carpets up - the loose 'fitted' type - and put them away. The vinyl floor is lovely and easy to clean. I put 2 bathmats down each side of the bed - rubber backing stops them moving and they are nice and warm to get out of bed onto. And I used a runner between the seats so we've got something soft and warm while we sit inside - when its too cold to sit in the awning. The runner was too long so I folded it in half and turn it every so often. I bought a lovely little stick vac to keep the mats clean and I use it to pick up any grass/mud that gets trodden inside before I mop the floor.

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when we replaced the carpet in our last van, and under the instructions of maggie!!!!!!!, i had a local carpet fitter do it, duralay underlat and gripper strips,it was the best we've ever seen in a van. it was quiet expensive £50 for fitting only but when you look at the small space to work in, number of fiddely cuts etc, we thought it was well worth it. no spilt blood either.

 

pete

 

Hi ctp. I was humming & haring about putting this post on in the early hours of this morning,I saw this request come up and though,NO,let us see what sort of mixed responses get posted.

Well,you have hit the nail right on the head. Unless an individual has had experience,and i DON'T MEAN a one time,OH LOOK how clever I am attempt. This is not a job for the B&Q Expert Bodger. It is a skilled trade. I know,it is a part of what I have carried out for the 48yrs in my trade prior to retiring.

 

 

 

 

Cosworth,get a notepad and do a detailed plan view of the caravan floor and show clearly the two greatest measurements and mark on the plan where the front window is.

The easiest way is measure the van from end to end,absolute maximum at floor level. The measure the internal width from board to board.

Go to a carpet shop and pick a roll end piece/remnant preferably a decent Twist (short & tight pile) and ask the guy for a contact number of the fitter that is the most capable in very tight/cramped locations.

It will most likely require a new underlay,I would recommend Cloud 9.

Get it done by a professional,it will pay dividends and restore the van to as near as supplied when new and at the same time adding value and making it more saleable and it will not look like a DIY effort.

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Hi ctp. I was humming & haring about putting this post on in the early hours of this morning,I saw this request come up and though,NO,let us see what sort of mixed responses get posted.

Well,you have hit the nail right on the head. Unless an individual has had experience,and i DON'T MEAN a one time,OH LOOK how clever I am attempt. This is not a job for the B&Q Expert Bodger. It is a skilled trade. I know,it is a part of what I have carried out for the 48yrs in my trade prior to retiring.

 

 

 

 

Cosworth,get a notepad and do a detailed plan view of the caravan floor and show clearly the two greatest measurements and mark on the plan where the front window is.

The easiest way is measure the van from end to end,absolute maximum at floor level. The measure the internal width from board to board.

Go to a carpet shop and pick a roll end piece/remnant preferably a decent Twist (short & tight pile) and ask the guy for a contact number of the fitter that is the most capable in very tight/cramped locations.

It will most likely require a new underlay,I would recommend Cloud 9.

Get it done by a professional,it will pay dividends and restore the van to as near as supplied when new and at the same time adding value and making it more saleable and it will not look like a DIY effort.

 

Hi

 

I agree with everything but cloud 9 underlay, I have found it too thick to allow for doors to open. Last caravan I fit took me just over 20 minutes twin axle swift, not a bad speed record.

 

Terry

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Hi ctp. I was humming & haring about putting this post on in the early hours of this morning,I saw this request come up and though,NO,let us see what sort of mixed responses get posted.

Well,you have hit the nail right on the head. Unless an individual has had experience,and i DON'T MEAN a one time,OH LOOK how clever I am attempt. This is not a job for the B&Q Expert Bodger. It is a skilled trade. I know,it is a part of what I have carried out for the 48yrs in my trade prior to retiring.

 

 

 

 

Cosworth,get a notepad and do a detailed plan view of the caravan floor and show clearly the two greatest measurements and mark on the plan where the front window is.

The easiest way is measure the van from end to end,absolute maximum at floor level. The measure the internal width from board to board.

Go to a carpet shop and pick a roll end piece/remnant preferably a decent Twist (short & tight pile) and ask the guy for a contact number of the fitter that is the most capable in very tight/cramped locations.

It will most likely require a new underlay,I would recommend Cloud 9.

Get it done by a professional,it will pay dividends and restore the van to as near as supplied when new and at the same time adding value and making it more saleable and it will not look like a DIY effort.

A bit harsh, I think there are a lot of useful posts with some good ideas in this topic.

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