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gumdrop

Holiday Photos

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I was treated to some photos taken with a bridge camera fitted with

a Raynox http://www. raynox. co. jp/english/egindex. htm macro lense

I was amazed and slightly jealous at the quality. Do any of you do macro

stuff? I bought a macro lense for my Nikon but have not really got down

to using it .

 

http://www. digitaltoyshop. co. uk/Accessories_Raynox_t932

 

http://photography-on-the. net/forum/showthread. php?t=807056

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Not done much close up stuff but i have a Canon twin flash unit that fits on the lens filter ring. This topic reminds me of it and I will have to get it set up and have a try.

 

How do you get the subject to wait while you set up to get their photo taken? ;)

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A pinprick of Honey or a spray of sugar solution (I used to use Delrosa rosehip syrup)

I pre-bait a flower or leaf. Watch shadows don't fall on the insect, and practice on flowers

plants water drops beforehand.

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Fantastic images, never been into photography, what sort of cost would you be looking at to start up and get some respectable results

 

 

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It depends on your budget!

A Bridge camera like the Panasonic Lumix FZ38 is around £250 the last time I looked,

but you would need to check that the raynox will fit, (it has various adapters)

Something smaller might be the Lumix TZ10? . ........... BUT I AM NO EXPERT

Then you go to DSLR with their interchangable lenses, Canon and Nikon have

the best ranges. You could buy a Body Only and just the lense you want (or

take what is offered i. e a kit lense typically 18-55mm)

I bought a Sigma 105mm macro lense, an 18-70mm Nikkor, and a 0-300mm Nikkor

Price has a huge bearing and each makers body does different things;

http://www. techradar. ..-brand-944543/2

This is just an example! Canon make similar spec. cameras, and is very popular

here http://www. wildaboutbritain. co. uk/forums/

Edited by gumdrop

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You can use a reversed manual aperture lense on an existing lense,

as long as you have a filter thread of 49mm - 55mm.

Typical Pentax lenses would cost around £30 plus a reversing or

stepping ring, for example look at this website.

http://www. ukcamera. com/denton/darkroom. php

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Thanks Gumdrop, don't now if the wife is ready for another of my hobbies just yet, but this is one that you can carry on with for many years

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Thanks Gumdrop, don't now if the wife is ready for another of my hobbies just yet, but this is one that you can carry on with for many years

There is plenty online to read, I still have a Pentax Spotmatic 2

film camera that takes a good slide or film photo.

You can pick them up cheap now. My Minolta bridge camera

was worth £15 after 12months to Jessops.

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The Red One



This was taken in 2008. Nice one but it flew off seconds later. . :(

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As if getting a nice shot was not enough,

you now need to find out what type of beetle :D

 

 

Black-headed Cardinal Beetle Pyrochroa coccinea ?

Edited by gumdrop

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This was taken in 2008. Nice one but it flew off seconds later. . :(

 

put it on a lily and it will stay there eating until there's nothing left :angry:

 

when you try to squish the lily beetle it drops to the ground turning upside down so you cant see it :huh:

 

http://apps. rhs. org. uk/advicesearch/profile. aspx?pid=553

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Thanks for the info. I could not find a match in my books. Paul's looks slightly different but nice resemblence

 

Black-headed Cardinal Beetle Pyrochroa coccinea ?

 

I think that is what it is. ......... http://www. google. co. ..EC-ad0AWtn4CYAw

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I've got one of the Sigma 70 - 300 & Macro lenses, some fantastic results in macro of insects and flowers

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I've got one of the Sigma 70 - 300 & Macro lenses, some fantastic results in macro of insects and flowers

I used one for years (still got it,) Sigma 70-300 DG APO a very useful "walking" lense

that macro is useful. Changed over to a Nikon VR 70-300 good lense but no macro switch

 

Thanks for the info. I could not find a match in my books. Paul's looks slightly different but nice resemblence

 

 

 

I think that is what it is. ......... http://www. google. co. ..EC-ad0AWtn4CYAw

Its the antenna, the Cardinals are more like a comb the

vine beetle (damn things) more like beads on a string

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It's quite good as with the size of the Canon sensor it is effectively 112 - 480, add a x2 converter and it becomes a very compact 960!!

Fair enough it doesn't gather enough light but for occasional use on a monopod or tripod it's quite useful

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I used one for years (still got it,) Sigma 70-300 DG APO a very useful "walking" lense

that macro is useful. Changed over to a Nikon VR 70-300 good lense but no macro switch

 

 

Its the antenna, the Cardinals are more like a comb the

vine beetle (damn things) more like beads on a string

 

:goodpost: thanks :)

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I have been into various types of photography for many years now and dabbled in macro for a while. I started with a set of close-up lenses that screwed to the filter thread of the lens but found that the quality was a little lacking though I did win a competition on a photography forum using them. The advantage is that there is little light loss using this method. I bought a set of automatic extension tubes from ebay cheaply and this was much better but the reduction in light level means flash usually has to be used. I used a Panasonic FZ20 bridge camera for a while and loved it apart from the red/green fringing at high zoom settings. I now use a Sony A700 DSLR but if this breaks I can't afford to replace it so I am hoping it will last for some time which is why I look after it. My main interest at present is studio and portrait photography as I have dug out my 4 head Portaflash system and am re-learning the art of lighting.

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Living where I do I tend to record the landscapes around here, but will cover a variety of subjects. A crisp winter day here so we're going out on the bikes (mine is new & this is it's first trip) with camera in bag

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Living where I do I tend to record the landscapes around here, but will cover a variety of subjects. A crisp winter day here so we're going out on the bikes (mine is new & this is it's first trip) with camera in bag

 

I bought my son a shutter release cable release/timer for Christmas,

not expensive, he set up to record river traffic on the Thames using

variations on the timer and got some really good shots.

I might get myself one and use it on a landscape dawn to dusk

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I have taken to doing the odd landscape but then use a series of panned shots and join them with Windows into a panarama. http://www. caravantalk. co. uk/community/gallery/image/6029-landscape/

 

To add height to the finished photograph I have been advised to take a series of portrait shots. This makes sense and when the time allows I will give it a try.

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An old tripod I had was marked to help take panoramas,

taking them in portrait is a good idea.

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There is a bracket you can buy that attaches to the tripod and the camera that allows the camera to swivel on an axis close to the end of the lens. This gives a truer pan and makes it easier for the stitching software to work. It basically offsets the camera from the pivot point.

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There is a bracket you can buy that attaches to the tripod and the camera that allows the camera to swivel on an axis close to the end of the lens. This gives a truer pan and makes it easier for the stitching software to work. It basically offsets the camera from the pivot point.

Any idea what it is called this attachment?

I think my old tripod was a Velbon(?)

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On the base of the camera should be a mark that shows the position of the film plane. Is this on a modern digital camera? It is a circle with a line through it.

 

As long as this aligns with the tripod screw all is well. The bracket must be a means of doing that.

 

I think it is more important in close up work though if you need to measure from film plane to subject.

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No focal plane marks LHD, the post drifted slightly to landscapes and panoramas ?

I popped a spider into the fridge to slow it down, so as I could take its photo.

Unfortunately, the Lioness was in tidying mode and I heard "whats this empty carton doing in the?" . ..............Aaaargh!

Macro spiders will have to wait, but there are some Winter Moths about, the birds are

collecting nest materials, I have a Woodmouse in the compost bin and if I plant some

Primroses I split up I may get Bee-Flys hovering around sometime soon. Until this cold

snap there were Newts and Frogs about in the undergrowth. :D

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