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Caravan Market Trends - Glass' Guide.


Diavolo Rosso
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This is an interesting, if not altogether surprising, report from Glass' Guide:

 

http://www. glassguide. co. uk/Market/?MarketID=5&Editorial=538

 

although the levels of reported stock is notable in comparison with sales trends, and the comments regarding the values of Sterling caravans compared to their Swift stablemates is also noteworthy.

 

Anyone wish to draw conclusions?

 

Al.

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This is an interesting, if not altogether surprising, report from Glass' Guide:

 

http://www. glassguid. ..5&Editorial=538

 

although the levels of reported stock is notable in comparison with sales trends, and the comments regarding the values of Sterling caravans compared to their Swift stablemates is also noteworthy.

 

Anyone wish to draw conclusions?

 

Al.

 

It seems that the biggest drop in demand is for six berth family caravans and that the smallest drop in demand is for two berth vans.

 

This is in line with the state of the economy in so much as couples with children, who would buy six berth vans, are feeling the effects of the economic problems more than the relatively unaffected retirees who buy the two berths.

 

I concur completely with their comment that Alde heating is perceived as highly desirable, I wouldn`t want to change back to blown air.

 

As regards Sterling prices compared with Swift, I consider the Sterling interiors more contemporary than the Swift interiors and therefore have previously attracted a small premium in the used market. However contemporary can also be fashion sensitive and maybe fashions are changing and Sterling interiors are going out of fashion ?

 

The above is my immediate opinion on the Glass`s article, other opinions are available and no doubt will be voiced !

 

Bob

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It seems that the biggest drop in demand is for six berth family caravans and that the smallest drop in demand is for two berth vans.

 

This is in line with the state of the economy in so much as couples with children, who would buy six berth vans, are feeling the effects of the economic problems more than the relatively unaffected retirees who buy the two berths.

 

I concur completely with their comment that Alde heating is perceived as highly desirable, I wouldn`t want to change back to blown air.

 

As regards Sterling prices compared with Swift, I consider the Sterling interiors more contemporary than the Swift interiors and therefore have previously attracted a small premium in the used market. However contemporary can also be fashion sensitive and maybe fashions are changing and Sterling interiors are going out of fashion ?

 

The above is my immediate opinion on the Glass`s article, other opinions are available and no doubt will be voiced !

 

Bob

 

I wonder if the fact there are more retired people about, in an ageing population, has as much bearing on the increased number of two berths?

 

There are so many wrinkles out and about now. .I think I may go back to work. :-)

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Interesting figures, thanks for posting.

 

I suppose it's inevitable, given the general state of the economy, that sales of touring caravans will be affected. Easy also to see that sales of 2 berth vans doing reasonably well with perhaps that segment of the population tending to be slightly better off coupled with new retiree's with their pension lump sums. I suppose the popularity of the Alde type heating will have a similar affect to the introduction of casette toilets!!! However we need to see how the new Truma combined water/heating systems with timer controls is accepted. The danger with falling sales, particularly if the dip is quite deep, is whether it puts some of the smaller manufacturers at risk as happen in the previous shakedown of industry.

 

David

David - Milton Keynes

Bailey Alliance 66-2 Motorhome for holidays and a Kia Venga for home.

 

Caravan Travels

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I wonder if the fact there are more retired people about, in an ageing population, has as much bearing on the increased number of two berths?

There are so many wrinkles out and about now. .I think I may go back to work. :-)

 

It works the other way too, the younger generation are struggling to live & buy a house with two wages, never mind raise kids

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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Yes, thanks for sharing the bad news.

 

Seems to relect the continuing bite of austerity.

 

The figures for statics, park homes and motorhomes were also gloomy.

 

I would like to see the industry slow down the change in models but sadly the reverse might occur in the struggle to survive.

 

Sarky first line was a joke before the grumps take me to task. It is the beauty of this forum that news items we might miss are reproduced for our edification.

 

Merry Christmas all.

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to be honest most of the retired couples, or working couples, that we know with vans have bigger fixed bed 4 berth vans, i cant remember the last time i saw an older couple with a smaller 2 berth. no doubt there are plenty about but i cant recall many.

 

pete

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to be honest most of the retired couples, or working couples, that we know with vans have bigger fixed bed 4 berth vans, i cant remember the last time i saw an older couple with a smaller 2 berth. no doubt there are plenty about but i cant recall many.

 

pete

 

Good point!

 

I forgot . ..we have a 4berth! LOL

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to be honest most of the retired couples, or working couples, that we know with vans have bigger fixed bed 4 berth vans, i cant remember the last time i saw an older couple with a smaller 2 berth. no doubt there are plenty about but i cant recall many.

 

pete

 

I concur, larger fixed twin or fixed doubles seem to be the most popular new van at the moment. Whilst they are classed as a four berth most will likely never be used as such.

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Children flew the nest 25 years ago but we still buy 4 berth as i find they retain value better. I did buy a 2 berth in 1989 but lost more money on that than any of the 14 vans i have ever owned.

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It does seem true that the T/A fixed bed layouts are becoming more popular with couples, as they offer practicality and comfort to those with a suitable towcar; and it's no coincidence that in recent years the number of motor manufacturers offering 4x4 vehicles has increased markedly. So for those with disposable income, and less attractive investment alternatives with interest rates low, it's a sensible leisure choice.

 

The demographic of caravanning has also seen changes in the last twenty years, attracting a greater number of younger people, and families. Caravan makers aim marketing at couples with disposable income and families; it will be interesting to see if in future they increase the range of 'vans that are lighter and cheaper, to respond to those who don't want to buy another vehicle, and to reflect pressure on incomes and fuel prices.

 

Btw sirjohnfaulkner - liked your ironic first line - Merry Christmas!

 

Al.

Edited by northa2901
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to be honest most of the retired couples, or working couples, that we know with vans have bigger fixed bed 4 berth vans, i cant remember the last time i saw an older couple with a smaller 2 berth. no doubt there are plenty about but i cant recall many.

 

pete

 

Certainly this would b my thoughts too. ...........also manyof my age seem to want to take grandkids on holidays too so 2 berths are no good for that. .......havng hadf 3 two berths I have always found reluctance in dealers taking them in owing to high stocks/slowmovers.

 

geoff

Kia Sorento KX-1 CRDI 4WD towing an Elddis Affinity 530

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Having got rid of our long serving twin axle Challenger 5 years ago when the kids stopped coming away with us, we bought a two berth, just for us.

Now we too have just taken delivery of a twin axle "four berth" that is really only going to be a two!

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It does seem true that the T/A fixed bed layouts are becoming more popular with couples, as they offer practicality and comfort to those with a suitable towcar; and it's no coincidence that in recent years the number of motor manufacturers offering 4x4 vehicles has increased markedly. So for those with disposable income, and less attractive investment alternatives with interest rates low, it's a sensible leisure choice.

 

The demographic of caravanning has also seen changes in the last twenty years, attracting a greater number of younger people, and families. Caravan makers aim marketing at couples with disposable income and families; it will be interesting to see if in future they increase the range of 'vans that are lighter and cheaper, to respond to those who don't want to buy another vehicle, and to reflect pressure on incomes and fuel prices.

 

Btw sirjohnfaulkner - liked your ironic first line - Merry Christmas!

 

Al.

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That's me totally weighed up then forty twin axle 4x4 fixed bed and only two of us should I pay some off the house na spend it on new caravan and awning

 

Oh but it hasn't got a mover so I can't be a real caravaner

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That's me totally weighed up then forty twin axle 4x4 fixed bed and only two of us should I pay some off the house na spend it on new caravan and awning

 

Oh but it hasn't got a mover so I can't be a real caravaner

 

Think you've crossed posts here jase525!

 

And I don't think Glass's guide had you in mind particularly - I certainly didn't!

 

Al.

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I have a two berth, as there just the two us us and our two hounds. Not retired and grandchild is only three, so too young to go with us for at least another three years. It's a longer bodied two berth so we not jammed in like sardines.

 

I hear so many reports on here about new caravans with serious water ingress, including two people I know outside of these forums that this has happened to, that is bound to have an effect on sales, as well as the current economic climate. I don't know which specific makes are the 'leaking buckets', or whether this gets reflected in the Glass' Guide?

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Think you've crossed posts here jase525!

 

And I don't think Glass's guide had you in mind particularly - I certainly didn't!

 

Al.

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And why would they not have me in mind am I missing something

Yes I realised that the not worthy of being a proper caravaner as I don't have a mover should have been posted elsewhere sorry

 

And why would they not have me in mind am I missing something

Yes I realised that the not worthy of being a proper caravaner as I don't have a mover should have been posted elsewhere sorry

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I'm afraid you've lost me here - why WOULD they have you, or anyone else, in mind. I posted the report from Glass' for members to consider and peruse - it wasn't a comment on anyone's particular type of purchase!

 

I'm sorry if I offended you when I commented that you had your posts crossed - you have no need to apologise. Anyway that other thread wasn't mine, and I don't believe anyone should have to have a mover, which you'll see from my comments on that thread!

 

Al.

 

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I replace my caravan every 3 years and have resigned myself to the prospect that it will have halved in value from new. ie it's 'losing' around 3k a year.

 

That sounds an awful lot to lose over three years.

 

We are changing ours after two years and have "lost" just under £4k. I am calculating this from the discounted price we paid for the van two years ago compared to the part ex we are receiving. On top of this of course we are getting 10% discount this time off the list price.

 

Bob

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The thing that I noticed most in the very interesting Glass's round up was the comment on the ever increasing cost to change. I think that is the biggest factor in creating a reluctance to change. We always used to pay 3 to 4 grand after 3 years: this time to go from a 2 berth Charisma to a U2 Valencia was considerably more than that. Don't expect to be changing again in the forseeable future.

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