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rickstevens

Blown Air Heating In Peg Verona

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Hi All

 

I'm sure there have been posts about this in the past, but I can't locate them, so apologies in advance if I'm causing a repeat thread.

 

The blown air heating in our Verona seems very biased toward the back of the van, the vent in the bedroom and bathroom both have a far higher flow of hot air than the front does.

 

The air coming out of the front is still hot, but you can hardly feel the air blowing through, and consequently the back of the van seems far warmer than the front does.

 

Im sure I read somewhere that there is something you can alter to make the air flow more to the front than the back.

 

Would any kind soul be able to provide me with an idiots guide on how to do this?

 

many thanks

 

Rick

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If you can get to the rear of the heater there is an adjustable diverter flap which allows you to adjust where the air is blown. Reduce the flow to the rear and increase it towards the front. Otherwise have the vents got flaps that you can close to reduce the airflow to the rear.

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If you can get to the rear of the heater there is an adjustable diverter flap which allows you to adjust where the air is blown. Reduce the flow to the rear and increase it towards the front. Otherwise have the vents got flaps that you can close to reduce the airflow to the rear.

 

Hi there, thanks for the reply. Any idea how I get at the back of the heater to adjust the diverter flap?

 

Rick

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No, I dont have a Verona so I dont know where its fitted and what furniture is located around it. Are there any drawers or shelves above it that you can remove. If not it's a bit drastic to try and remove the whole heater just to tweak the flap. Just bung up the rear vents or change them for closeable ones.

 

Is any of the ducting routed oustside under the van, especially from the heater to the front. If so it really makes abig difference if you insulate it to reduce the heat loss. There are several threads that give advice on how to do it

Edited by matelodave

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No, I dont have a Verona so I dont know where its fitted and what furniture is located around it. Are there any drawers or shelves above it that you can remove. If not it's a bit drastic to try and remove the whole heater just to tweak the flap. Just bung up the rear vents or change them for closeable ones

 

Thanks for the info, there's no easy way (that I can see) to get behind the heater, so I'll do as you suggest and close the vents at the back. Will this force more air to the front?

 

I'll have a word with the dealer to see if they can alter it properly when its in for its service.

 

many thanks

 

Rick

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You can have a look at the ducting to make sure it's not crushed and that it's properly connected to the fittings - it's not unheard of for the duct to either come off the heater or one of the vents behind the panelling.

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Thats one of the first things I checked, and they seem to be seated OK

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There may be a removable wooden panel at the foot of the bed - either behind the mattress or underneath the bed base. .. removing that should allow you to see/ reach the ducts and the main plastics one exiting the ultraheat behind the fire which has the adjuster in it. You need to remove the plastic bungs in the screwheads to access the wood screws (pozi-style).

 

That's how I got to mine on the Rimini to direct much more to the lounge (although it has single beds I'm sure it will be similar) - I plan to add under-floor pipe insulation to see if that helps, too!

 

The baffle lever was 'under' the duct in my case.

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There may be a removable wooden panel at the foot of the bed - either behind the mattress or underneath the bed base. .. removing that should allow you to see/ reach the ducts and the main plastics one exiting the ultraheat behind the fire which has the adjuster in it. You need to remove the plastic bungs in the screwheads to access the wood screws (pozi-style).

 

That's how I got to mine on the Rimini to direct much more to the lounge (although it has single beds I'm sure it will be similar) - I plan to add under-floor pipe insulation to see if that helps, too!

 

The baffle lever was 'under' the duct in my case.

 

Great Stuff - Thank you :D I shall be going back to the van tomorrow so I'll have a look.

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The only reason we didn't buy a Verona was the ducted air system, as its the same basic layout as our Valencia.

 

Your front lounge is fed from a duct running outside under the door, so that is were your heat losses are, balancing the air diverter should help, but probably requires the fire removing?

 

With our last caravan i gave up trying to use the blown air, and just used the fire as a convection heater, aided with a portable fan heater, that way the system is much more efficient.

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Rodders53 is correct.

 

There is an access panel at the foot of the bed, in the bed storage area. No need to remove the fire.

 

Our 534 heating is fine at the front vents, so like said, just re-adjust the manifold.

Edited by Gaz40

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If your any good at diy, and there is a suitable place for a lever operated diverter valve (like the awning outlet ones) you could fit one in the rear piping so it can be adjusted as you require.

Our bathroom is the closest outlet from the fan, with having the water deflector over the outlet to prevent shower water entering it, there was no easy way to manually close the flap in the outlet. I purchased the diverter valve and lever from an ebay seller and fitted it between the fan unit and bathroom outlet. (front and rear seperatly piped) i can now open or close the bathroom outlet from the lever thats fitted next to the fire. There isn't much involved to fitting one if you have space. The lever could even be left under a bed box for ease depending on layout.

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If your any good at diy, and there is a suitable place for a lever operated diverter valve (like the awning outlet ones) you could fit one in the rear piping so it can be adjusted as you require.

Our bathroom is the closest outlet from the fan, with having the water deflector over the outlet to prevent shower water entering it, there was no easy way to manually close the flap in the outlet. I purchased the diverter valve and lever from an ebay seller and fitted it between the fan unit and bathroom outlet. (front and rear seperatly piped) i can now open or close the bathroom outlet from the lever thats fitted next to the fire. There isn't much involved to fitting one if you have space. The lever could even be left under a bed box for ease depending on layout.

Hi, We did the ducting with insulating stuff from Screwfix ( as recommended on here ) the difference was fantastic ! we now get hot air coming out of the bathroom vent ! the heating duct runs outside under the floor for 9ft.

david

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David 1220, ours was the opposite, we couldn't easily stop the bathroom from turning into a sauna. The rest of the van still got its fair share of hot, but the bathroom was unbearable if it had been on for any legth of time. Fitting the valve i can now adjust the bathroom as we please.

This could also work for altering the amount of hot going anywhere in any van, if there is a suitable place for the valve. It is basically a cable operated in-line flap so can be fitted almost anywhere that space allows for the operating lever.

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Shouldn't Bailey be fitting suitable ducting in the first place?

Its unacceptable on a 2012 caravan.

 

I can't see why ducting isn't run inside the caravan, after all the Unicorn has a step over ducting to pass the heating pipe through, along with cables.

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Shouldn't Bailey be fitting suitable ducting in the first place? - Yes they should!

Its unacceptable on a 2012 caravan. - Entirely agree

 

I can't see why ducting isn't run inside the caravan, after all the Unicorn has a step over ducting to pass the heating pipe through, along with cables. - Could the reason be that it lowers their production costs? If it saves them money, then they'll do it!

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They could quite easily save money and still insulate any external ducting. Build the product with reliablity we expect then all the now not needed warranty work would save them a blooming fortune !!!!!!

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They could quite easily save money and still insulate any external ducting. Build the product with reliablity we expect then all the now not needed warranty work would save them a blooming fortune !!!!!!

 

I entirely agree with you. It is usually false economy to try and save a few pennies on a component fitted to any 'quality' product, as it can frequently cost pounds to rectify such an error.

 

If I, and many other fellow caravan owners can understand this rationale - why can't the caravan manufacturers?

 

Regards,

David

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I entirely agree with you. It is usually false economy to try and save a few pennies on a component fitted to any 'quality' product, as it can frequently cost pounds to rectify such an error.

 

If I, and many other fellow caravan owners can understand this rationale - why can't the caravan manufacturers?

 

Regards,

David

 

Because the manufacturers know the costs of remedial work and everyone else is merely speculating about the so-called high costs of warranty and remedial work.

 

When the warranty and remedial costs start to affect the bottom line, manufacturers may take steps, but probably by increasing the price. :rolleyes:

Edited by DeeTee

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I understand the point that you are making, but not sure that I completely agree regarding the 'merely speculating' bit.

 

Taking any component (a water tap, a battery charger etc.) that a manufacturer fits to their caravan; their cost price can hypothetically be £20 for a low cost component or £25 for a more substantial item. Should the low cost item fail during the warranty period, then it will cost them to replace it.

 

Neglecting the cost of supplying the replacement unit, they have to pay the dealer for removing the old and fitting the new component. Even taking the low hourly rate that caravan manufacturers pay dealers for warranty work (C. £30/hour), and assuming that it takes only 30 mins. to remove and replace and test the new component, then it has cost the manufacturer £15.

 

Now I don't have a degree in Applied Mathematics, but I can calculate that it has cost the manufacturer £10 more than fitting a better quality component in the first place. Additionally, their reputation for supplying a 'quality product' has been dented and they have lost some of their customer's good will, as it has cost them time and money to return the caravan to the dealer for rectification of the fault.

 

Regards,

David

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Because the manufacturers know the costs of remedial work and everyone else is merely speculating about the so-called high costs of warranty and remedial work.

 

When the warranty and remedial costs start to affect the bottom line, manufacturers may take steps, but probably by increasing the price. :rolleyes:

 

Nail,Head Hit!

 

We come on here mumping left right and centre about quality /reliability issues, but are we prepared to pay the price we would need to pay(and accept the weight penalty) for a true quality product? I think not.

Instead we'll keep expecting faultless 'vans at a budget price.

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I don't recall moaning about our van. And it cost less than 11k brand new for a fully working and kitted out 6 berth. (yes i know its not to everyones taste or requirements but it seems to do what you would expect)

 

Without drifting from the OP too far maybe its just some expect too much from a product?

Or is it uk manufacturers take the ****?

 

Back to OP question, insulation may solve the problem, if it was fitted at manufacture the cost would be minimal. You can get the product from a seller on ebay for less than £10 a meter. Now they i imagine are selling at a profit, so the cost in bulk to a manufacturer would be minimal.

 

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David

 

I was referring to the manufacturers' bean counters knowing the overall costs of all remedial and warranty work and its effect on the bottom line.

 

I follow your reasoning above but in the hypothetical examples cited only the caravan manufacturers know how many valid and successful claims are made for faulty components. The faulty components will be replaced or refunded by the component manufacturer or supplier and the caravan manufacturer can claim it was a bad batch of components and nothing to do with them.

 

In the event of replacing a battery charger/power supply unit, or other items which have a warranty from the item's manufacturer, the supplying dealer would probably have to stand the cost the work involved, as the claim would be against the dealer. The owner of the caravan would have to bear the cost of taking the caravan to the dealer for examination and for the remedial or warranty work to be carried out.

 

DeeTee

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In my experience companies are run by accountants these days, and even if it would be cheaper in the long run to do something, they will rarely say yes if there is an immediate and cheaper solution. So for instance in the example above about the tap, it is cheaper today to fit the cheap tap, even though tomorrow we may incur costs replacing it. It means this years expenses are minimised, of course on next years books there may well be an increase in warranty costs. ....

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This heat loss is familiar with all owners with blown air who have long runs of ducting under the caravan.

My old Vermont had about 4M of under floor ducting, even with the diverter flap fully biased to the shower room, due to the ducting outside the shower room never got warm.

 

In minus 6 degrees C, its not difficult to work out why the air is only coming out lukewarm.

 

I had a avondale with ducted air that was cosy warm, the fire was on the opposite side to the door, so the ducting was all inside.

 

Alde heating is very popular primarily because so many ducted air systems are installed badly.

Even the Alde system can be installed incorrectly, my U1 Valencia has the alli heating pipe running behind the fridge totally unlagged, so I've lagged it, as the heat was simply going up and out of the fridge vents.

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