Jump to content

How To Jack Up A Twin Axle Van


Recommended Posts

I was scratching my head trying to figure out how to jack up my twin axle van the other day. I would prefer to figure it out now rather than wait for the inevitable puncture to come along. On my old single axle van the book said to put the trolly jack under the axle as close to the wheel as possible. The book for my current van isnt very helpful but if I apply the same logic and place it under one of the axles would the one axle be able to take the weight? Another problem is that the twin drive movers make access rather difficult. I know that a special jacking point can be fitted to the frame, but once again the mover mechanism would make it difficult to get to. Has anyone here overcome this issue?

 

Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

On the BPW chassis is a strengthening plate which spans the axles along the side of the chassis which i use as it is thick material and capable of jacking and lifts both axles . i put my trolley jack under this to jack as getting under the axles can be difficult with the mover. I dont think any of the chassis would take any jacking itself being thin.

 

 

 

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Dave I did notice the plate you mention but wondered if would be strong enough, I didn't like to try it with out checking here first

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was scratching my head trying to figure out how to jack up my twin axle van the other day. I would prefer to figure it out now rather than wait for the inevitable puncture to come along. On my old single axle van the book said to put the trolly jack under the axle as close to the wheel as possible. The book for my current van isnt very helpful but if I apply the same logic and place it under one of the axles would the one axle be able to take the weight? Another problem is that the twin drive movers make access rather difficult. I know that a special jacking point can be fitted to the frame, but once again the mover mechanism would make it difficult to get to. Has anyone here overcome this issue?

 

Thanks

If you have got Reich Movers they supply a bracket, which is designed to take either an Alko or BPW jack and that actually fits on the cross tube of the rear movers, and NOT on the caravans chassis.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Inner State

Dont need to do any of the above, simply use a leveling ramp (I use the Fiamma ones) drive the good wheel up the ramp, that will give enough height with complete safety to change the wheel. I have done this a couple of times the front wheel of the pair on one occasion and the rear on the other occasion, takes all of 30 seconds to jack up!

 

J

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dont need to do any of the above, simply use a leveling ramp (I use the Fiamma ones) drive the good wheel up the ramp, that will give enough height with complete safety to change the wheel. I have done this a couple of times the front wheel of the pair on one occasion and the rear on the other occasion, takes all of 30 seconds to jack up! J

 

 

When you put the weight of the caravan on one wheel you are putting nearly twice the weight the tyre and suspension is designed to take .

This could give suspension problems or damage the structure in the tyre .

 

A twin axle caravan is designed to take it weight on 4 wheels so the loading is designed for only about 1000kg per axle and 500kg per wheel .

 

Caravan suspension is only rubber . On a BPW chassis with V tech axle the wheels are set on a geometry that can be altered if overloaded .

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

Agree with Inner State. When we had a 'blowout' in France 2010 - of course offside on an Autoroute - the method was . ....

1) Get spare wheel ready

2) Get levelling ramps (both) ready

3) Loosen Wheel Nuts

4) Put both levelling ramps (making a steep slope) next to unaffected tyre

5) Carefully pull van with car on to levelling ramps thus lifting the deflated tyre

6) Lower the corner steadies this side to just touch the ground (no pressure) - this stops buffeting movement from traffic

7) Remove wheel and put on spare and do wheel nuts up hand ratchet tight

8) Raise corner steadies and lower caravan back off ramps

9) Do wheel nuts up to correct tightness (otherwise known as tight)

10) Drive carefully to next designated services / rest area / layby and recheck wheel nuts / recheck pressure

 

Whilst I understand where Commander Dave is coming from, for a short while the suspension units can take the weight or, unfortunately, the chassis would have failed type approval (or its equivalent) as it would not be able to cope with everyday use.

Edited by utccman
Link to post
Share on other sites

I always carry a 2 ton trolly jack (Aldi) special,I have carried it for years and used it last week on my supercyclone,I placed the jack between the wheels and using a piece of wood 12ins long 2ins wide 1ins thick jacked it up on the reinforced plate on the BPW chassis with no problems. I have practised doing this on every van I have owned so I knew what to expect,

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Inner State

When you put the weight of the caravan on one wheel you are putting nearly twice the weight the tyre and suspension is designed to take .

This could give suspension problems or damage the structure in the tyre .

 

A twin axle caravan is designed to take it weight on 4 wheels so the loading is designed for only about 1000kg per axle and 500kg per wheel .

 

Caravan suspension is only rubber . On a BPW chassis with V tech axle the wheels are set on a geometry that can be altered if overloaded .

 

Dave

Sorry, this is complete and utter baloney, where do you think the weight is when one tyre is deflated? It's all on the good tyre. When the vehicle is moving the weight of the dyma,ic load is many times higher than the static weight of the vehicle so the chassis and suspension can easily cope with the static load under these conditions. What do you think would happen on speed bumps, do both wheels stay on the ground?, dropped kerbs? The list goes on.

 

Twin axles cope easily with the method I've suggested and I see absolutely no reason that this would cause any issues.

 

J

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree with 3 star, while I have no mechanical back ground I would have thought that three wheels can cope with the static load whilst completing the wheel change.

If for example and this is keeping it really simple the van weighs 1400kgs then divided by 4 each wheel is taking 350kgs, now in my case I have a six berth so if each person weighs 100kgs that means a added 150kgs per wheel would be added to each wheel taking it to 450kg.

But while doing the wheel change the (caravan empty of people) 350kgs is spread onto the other wheels 117kgs per wheel which is 467kgs per wheel which is 17kgs over what each wheel would have bearing down on it with 6 people occupying it.

If 17kgs would damage the caravan then I would suggest that the safety margins are too low.

Before I am jumped all over for my mathes and load bearing knowledge like I have said I have tried to keep it simple.

I thought the idea of using the ramp was a easy option to a awkward situation.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Inner State

I have to agree with 3 star, while I have no mechanical back ground I would have thought that three wheels can cope with the static load whilst completing the wheel change.

If for example and this is keeping it really simple the van weighs 1400kgs then divided by 4 each wheel is taking 350kgs, now in my case I have a six berth so if each person weighs 100kgs that means a added 150kgs per wheel would be added to each wheel taking it to 450kg.

But while doing the wheel change the (caravan empty of people) 350kgs is spread onto the other wheels 117kgs per wheel which is 467kgs per wheel which is 17kgs over what each wheel would have bearing down on it with 6 people occupying it.

If 17kgs would damage the caravan then I would suggest that the safety margins are too low.

Before I am jumped all over for my mathes and load bearing knowledge like I have said I have tried to keep it simple.

I thought the idea of using the ramp was a easy option to a awkward situation.

Never thought of that angle and I agree with you! add to that the dynamic loads, pot holes in roads, uneven road surfaces would all put loads way in excess of raising the caravan on a ramp.

 

J

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, this is complete and utter baloney, where do you think the weight is when one tyre is deflated? It's all on the good tyre. When the vehicle is moving the weight of the dyma,ic load is many times higher than the static weight of the vehicle so the chassis and suspension can easily cope with the static load under these conditions. What do you think would happen on speed bumps, do both wheels stay on the ground?, dropped kerbs? The list goes on.

 

Twin axles cope easily with the method I've suggested and I see absolutely no reason that this would cause any issues.

 

J

 

:lol:

 

Check your tyre maximum loading and it will be a quater +10% of the total weight of the caravan .

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave
Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol:

 

Check your tyre maximum loading and it will be a quater +10% of the total weight of the caravan .

 

 

Dave

 

A tyre will carry it max rated weight at its max rated speed. If a vehicle is not moving or moving very slow this weight could be calculated a lot higher. That is how very heavy loads are moved and one reason they move slowly.

 

As already said dynamic loads when moving will put far more stress on a tyre than running one tyre onto a ramp.

 

Richard. ..

Edited by Cannondale
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Inner State

:lol:

 

Check your tyre maximum loading and it will be a quater +10% of the total weight of the caravan .

 

 

Dave

So please tell me why the good tyre doesn't instantly burst when it's partner fails and how on earth does it stand the additional weight when the caravan is bouncing around on our pot hole laden roads? They are designed for the max load with the additional 'weight' when moving therefore raising it up as I suggested is well within it's load capability.

 

J

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 years later...

If I use a peice of 2x2" wood to spread the load over both axles and use a bottle jack would that be ok

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 16/03/2012 at 08:55, CommanderDave said:

 

 

When you put the weight of the caravan on one wheel you are putting nearly twice the weight the tyre and suspension is designed to take .

This could give suspension problems or damage the structure in the tyre .

 

A twin axle caravan is designed to take it weight on 4 wheels so the loading is designed for only about 1000kg per axle and 500kg per wheel .

 

Caravan suspension is only rubber . On a BPW chassis with V tech axle the wheels are set on a geometry that can be altered if overloaded .

 

Dave

 

No, the caravan will be fine going up on one wheel to change the other. If you watch a twin axle trailer/caravan go along a bumpy road or off a kerb etc quite often one wheel is off the ground. 

 

Also tyre load ratings are done for when the wheel is going round not stationary. 
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

When jacking up any trailer I will normally have it connected to the car and jack up the rear axle on which ever sides needs doing, even if its the front one that needs changing i just jack the whole lot higher to give the clearance. So far not had an issue with caravans or plant trailers, however with a lot of weight on the plant trailer I would probably but  length of wood between the two axels and jack from the middle. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting debate...another point worth noting is when you jack up the side with the flat tyre (either twin or single axle) you are actually putting ALL the weight on the tyres on opposite side of the van...with no bad effects for the time it takes to make the tyre change........;-)

Just reiterating other peoples views of course....

Edited by charlieboy2608
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, charlieboy2608 said:

Very interesting debate...another point worth noting is when you jack up the side with the flat tyre (either twin or single axle) you are actually putting ALL the weight on the tyres on opposite side of the van...with no bad effects for the time it takes to make the tyre change........;-)

Surely the Jack is taking the weight of the raised side. So no transfer of weight elsewhere. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, CraigP2005 said:

Surely the Jack is taking the weight of the raised side. So no transfer of weight elsewhere. 

Absolutely.......only marginal weight transfer due to jacking the deflated side slightly higher to remove the damaged (or flat) tyre.

The point was I attempting to make based on others opinions is there would be minimum damage to the opposite tyre (s) during a wheel change procedure.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...