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How Far Down Should Corner Stabilisers Go?


shedpuller

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Am first year caravanner still learning the ropes. Have noticed when pitched that there is some movement of the van when moving about, especially when staggering to to the toilet in a drunken stupor in the middle of the night. Have wound down legs a bit more and helps but not cured the problem. How much are the legs "stabilisers" as opposed to "load bearers"?

 

Am I expecting too much? Do all vans wobble a bit when moving about?

 

If I experiment further I presume it is not a good idea to wind legs down till wheels clear the ground! What is good practice? Is the aim to take just a little of the weight off the wheels to ease the wobble from the tyres or should I put more load on the legs and less on the wheels?

 

And no, I am not prepared to give up the drink to solve the problem.

 

Any ideas?

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Wind the legs down until a firm pressure is achieved - you shouldn't cause the van to wobble as you wobble around inside :D

 

Also, aim to wind the legs down only as far as 45 degrees - use steady blocks underneath the feet if necessary

 

ATB

Moose

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Shedpuller,

 

I find my back end wobbles from side to side ( :blink: ) a bit, which I have always put down to the rear steadies facing directly to the back of the van (if you get what I mean!). The van can seem to 'settle' after a bit of time, so I seem to find my self winding the steadies another turn or two to adjust.

 

Don't worry too much, unless you think your on a boat and get sea sick. .. :P:unsure:

 

HTH - Gaz

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1st - With the price of Stella at the moment, why can you walk at all after a quiet evening in ?? ;)

 

2nd - Have you levelled side to side ?? :unsure:

 

3rd - Moose, Why only 45 degrees, what difference does it make? :huh:

 

Wildkat B)

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Wind the legs down until a firm pressure is achieved - you shouldn't cause the van to wobble as you wobble around inside  :D

 

Also, aim to wind the legs down only as far as 45 degrees - use steady blocks underneath the feet if necessary

 

ATB

Moose

40853[/snapback]

 

Agree with this Moose. It's amazing how many people ask what they should do if the Steadiblocs (see pic) are too high. Answer: don't wind the leg down as far.

 

In answer to Wildkats query. when past 45 degrees, the force is more sideways than downwards, reaching its extreme when the leg is vertical.

 

About 5 years ago there were a couple of kits to prevent sideways movement of the 'van. One consisted of two steel cables connected diagonally to the top and bottom of the rear steadies and the other a single tube arrangement (again diagonally)similar to a panhard rod. Can't say we've noticed a problem with this but we do have to re-tension the steadies when the ground is soft.

 

Mike

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Am first year caravanner still learning the ropes. Have noticed when pitched that there is some movement of the van when moving about, especially when staggering to to the toilet in a drunken stupor in the middle of the night. Have wound down legs a bit more and helps but not cured the problem. How much are the legs "stabilisers" as opposed to "load bearers"?

 

Am I expecting too much? Do all vans wobble a bit when moving about?

 

If I experiment further I presume it is not a good idea to wind legs down till wheels clear the ground! What is good practice? Is the aim to take just a little of the weight off the wheels to ease the wobble from the tyres or should  I put more load on the legs and less on the wheels?

 

And no, I am not prepared to give up the drink to solve the problem.

 

Any ideas?

40850[/snapback]

 

Do you wind the steadies down before you unload the van. I carry everything that is heavy in the van, over the axle but I always unlod the van before I drop the steadies. The reason for this is that as you unload, the van lifts on the suspension so I would have to wind the legs down a little more after unloading.

 

My van also wobbles a little when I move about neat the back but I just forget it. You'll never achive a 'rock-steady' setup whatever you do.

 

navigator

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I often read that steadies should not be wound down to hard as they are fixed to the floor which might be damaged by to much pressure. While this is true to a degree it does not mean your van should rock about either!. You can be assured that the steadies although defiantly not advisable will more or less hold the full weight of your van!!, so supporting the corners without rocking is the minimum they will do,

 

As for angle of dangle!?, ask yourself when was the last time you saw the support columns of a building other than vertical?, this is where they are at there their strongest. .. as are your steadies.

gary1s.gif

 

Arc Systems are specialist Carver caravan product repairers, committed to providing a comprehensive service as well as spare parts for these popular heaters.

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Thanks for the input folks,

 

Yes I do level up pretty well with a spirit level before winding down.

 

You have put my mind at rest, it seems that I am being a bit fussy trying to get it rock staedy but sounds as I can put a bit of pressure on legs to minimise the problem.

 

Off to the Lake District soon so will put ideas into practice, especially the Stella although my home brewed "Nelsons Revenge" will beat it for flavour and be historically more appropriate.

 

Cheers!

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I often read that steadies should not be wound down to hard as they are fixed to the floor which might be damaged by to much pressure. While this is true to a degree it does not mean your van should rock about either!. You can be assured that the steadies although defiantly not advisable will more or less hold the full weight of your van!!, so supporting the corners without rocking is the minimum they will do,

 

As for angle of dangle!?, ask yourself when was the last time you saw the support columns of a building other than vertical?, this  is where they are at there their strongest. .. as are your steadies.

41677[/snapback]

 

Gary

 

The steadies themselves may be at their strongest when vertical but the force applied to ground by the mechanism is not. Indeed, when the steady is vertical winding the screw will only produce sideways movement parallel to the ground - not what you want. A 'van on level ground will have steadies at about 45 degrees and a height at each end of about 30cm. So a single axle 'van on a pitch of maximum slope will have the steadies at the rear not wound down (in practice a little way) and the front steadies will be clear of the groung without using blocks of or Steadiblocs.

 

Incidentally, Alko quote the maximum permitted loading of standard steadies at 800kg and 1,000kg for the heavy duty ones. The anticipated loading is around 500kg.

 

Mike

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What you are saying Mike is there is very little usable adjustment for levelling purposes as the steady approaches the vertical which is perfectly correct, but that wasn't the question.

The steady is there to level the van and hold it firmly in that position, all I was doing was quoting the maximums but in reality most people will level the van with the minimum effort which implies lowering the legs as little as possible and given I have suitable 'Steadibloc's' I do the same. :rolleyes:

gary1s.gif

 

Arc Systems are specialist Carver caravan product repairers, committed to providing a comprehensive service as well as spare parts for these popular heaters.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A couple more thoughts. ......

 

The size of feet can have an influence in settling once on a pitch. The smaller the area in contact with the groung the more likely that the steady could settle into the ground, on anything other than concrete. So spreading the weight by using bigger feet will reduce the chance of the foot settling in. Most, although not folks, seem to have the additional plastic feet of one make or another. I've noticed that on soft ground the plastic feet can distort so have some pieces of wood (cut a little larger than the plastic feet) and find this helps.

 

Also an idea to check the tension in the steadies once you've moved about in van a bit (but before the first nights Stella has been consumed!) And again perhaps a check if there has been any rain. ...topical after the week we've had!

 

Perhaps going one stage too far for some, if you use a portable electric drill to drop the steadies you can use the torque setting to ensure that the pressure on each steady is even. ...

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I always think that the feet you can attach to the steadies are too small for any other than very firm ground. I use the plastic (polypropylene?) chopping boards that you can buy for less than a pound. I have 6, four for the steadies, one for the jockey wheel and one for use as a chopping board!!! :)

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