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Big Tim

Rear Road Light Fixings

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:angry: Why oh why aren't simple things so simple!!

 

This evening I went out to change a rear road light bulb on offside of my Avondale Landranger. Simple job I thought although I had not done it before.

 

Four bolts hold on combined "wrap" rear light cluster. First bolt came out fine. Next ones made strange grinding sound and spun round but did not screw out. After trying for several minutes without success I unscrewed nearside lamp cluster to see if could identify the problem. That fortunately came off okay. The clusters are held on by 4 bolts which screw into cylindrical "nuts" set in the fibregrlass body work of the rear panel.

 

The threads on the nuts on the offside are either stripped or siezed with rust. With a lot of effort I have loosened another bolt so that I can see that that is the problem. I have loosened the 3 stuck bolt sufficiently to be able to hacksaw off the heads. remove light cluster and then drill out the remains of the bolts as necessary.

 

That's a pain but an even bigger problem is how do I then refix the light cluster, ie, what can I screw the bolts into.

 

HELP folks, anyone out there got any suggestions.

 

There is not, by the way any access to the panel behind the fitting so I cannot bolt right through the rear panel and put a nut on the back of it.

 

All sensible suggestions gladly received.

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stab in the dark here; plasterboard fixings ie the things you use for fixing something onto a dry lined wall - theres loads of different types most working on the principle of the fitting going through the hole (there must be a cavity the other side and a clean about 8 mm hole) and as you tighten the bolt supplied in the fixing, it spreads the fixing behind thus giving a secure fixing. sorry too many fixings :blink: Its all dependant on drilling out and losing completely all remenants of the original bolt and fixing though :rolleyes:

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My son had some sort of problems with his lights. To cut along story short, it was suggested he used some form of plaster board rawplugs or toggles, because his screws went right through.

Steve

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Could the cluster be secured from the inside with some wire attached and then fed through a suitable hole and anchored from behind if you have access to do this - and/or perhaps stick the whole lot back on including the screwheads with clear silicone sealer ??

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I had the same problem with my last van. As others have suggested - I super-glued Plas-plugs (the type used for plasterboard) into suitably enlarged holes in the rear wall then used a self tapping screw to hold the light fitting.

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Thanks for the advice lads

 

It seesm that the nuts were probably riv--nuts. They were actually a hollow structure and so they came out easily with a tug of the pliers. The nuts were so siezed they looked as though they had been welded

 

I had a look at B&Q and found some large nylon fixing designed for platerboard walls. These consist of large nylon screws which take a plated self-tapping screw. With a bit of adjustment to the nylon screws (I narrowed the width with a "Stanley" knife) I got them to screw into the caravan bodywork. They fitting now seems secure and at least the nylon part cannot rust.

 

The 'van is now roadworthy again.

 

Thanks again for your advice.

 

Tim

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Rawplug do a special fixing for fixing light clusters to fiberglass. Most caravan dealers will stock them about £1. 50 for two

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You are right in saying that the fittings are either Riv-Nuts or NutSerts; two different but similar types of blind threaded fixings.

 

RivNuts are inserted into the blind hole, then clenched using a special tool. NutSerts are the same, but can be clenched using either a special tool (better) or - if you are working in sheet metal - by tightneing a nut on the shank of a bolt threaded into the insert (put a couple of washers under the nut).

 

Fixing into fibreglass is a BIG problem as it has a nasty tendency to shatter or crumble. I agree that the best anwer to your problem is probably plasterboar fixings; I would go for the re-uesable silicone rubber type myself.

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Correctly named 'Cavity light fixer'. It comprises of a little rubber grommet with a metal threaded insert and acts as a rawl plug. Bought some in a car a caravan shop near Shrewsbury. Unfortunately I cannot remember the exact location but the part number on the pa met is 37729/37731 long. Would have thought that any caravan shop will pop the number into their database and come up with the goods. Hope this helps.

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3 minutes ago, jjohnd said:

Correctly named 'Cavity light fixer'. It comprises of a little rubber grommet with a metal threaded insert and acts as a rawl plug. Bought some in a car a caravan shop near Shrewsbury. Unfortunately I cannot remember the exact location but the part number on the pa met is 37729/37731 long. Would have thought that any caravan shop will pop the number into their database and come up with the goods. Hope this helps.

As JJohnd has said,    I had the same problem with the sterling front marker lights, there are 2/3 different sizes, I got mine from Grantham Caravans, very helpful. search on ebay for 

these

fixings.png

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Is this a record for reactivating an old thread?  14 years!

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More usual name is 'Rubber Well Nuts', had mine from eBay, for those interested that is. ;)

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Posted (edited)

Tip I have found over the years .

When fitting put the screws though the light fitting then screw on the rubber inserts onto the end of the screws without compressing the rubber then insert the unit lining up the bushes with the holes . If you try putting the inserts in then try and screw into them chances are they will pop through the holes .

 

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

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1 minute ago, CommanderDave said:

Tip I have found over the years .

When fitting put the screws though the light fitting then screw on the rubber inserts onto the end of the screws without compressing the rubber then insert the unit lining up the bushes with the holes . If you try putting the inserts in then try and screw into them chances are they will pop through the holes .

Dave

 

+1.

That's the way I have always done it.

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59 minutes ago, CommanderDave said:

Tip I have found over the years .

When fitting put the screws though the light fitting then screw on the rubber inserts onto the end of the screws without compressing the rubber then insert the unit lining up the bushes with the holes . If you try putting the inserts in then try and screw into them chances are they will pop through the holes .

Dave


:Plus1:

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On the subject of light fittings, is it possible to check the serviceability of the rear lights without connecting to the car electrics?

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Posted (edited)
44 minutes ago, jjohnd said:

On the subject of light fittings, is it possible to check the serviceability of the rear lights without connecting to the car electrics?

Yes, but to do it easily requires a bit of kit with a 13 pin socket, a battery and some switches.

Something like this

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Caravan-Electrical-Light-Portable-Tester-Includes-Fridge-Car-Van-Tow-Bar-Test/162510648039?hash=item25d663b2e7:g:r1gAAOSw53NY~z8P

I have seen less professional ones but can't find one right now.

I made a rather Heath Robinson one up some years ago for 7 pin electrics but chucked it because I needed the space and could not be bothered converting it to 13 pin.

 

There are some that use a small battery to just check for continuity, but I prefer one with a big enough battery to actually light the bulb.

Edited by Stevan

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37 minutes ago, Paul1957 said:

Strange that they call that an "extension lead". It has plugs on both ends, no socket!

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