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Hi morepower. I hope you will forgive me for sticking my motty in. As a veteran cyclist (currently 66yrs old) my very first observation is the extra weight that you will be having to move/propel. The position that you are riding at is a very very low one in the relationship of bars & saddle height. A frame with a longer steerer tube and a slightly more compact geometry including a short reach stem and incorporating a dropped top tube will give a much more comfortable albeit upright riding posture.

I myself have two bikes,one is my Bianchi (ID image) and the other is a 2009 Claud Butler Levante Hybrid Road Bike with carbon forks.

I am actually building a third one at present based on a compact geometry Aluminium frame with carbon forks,my Claud is a very nice,lively ride but I think that the one that I am building might well win the day and possibly be the only steed in the stable very soon.

 

 

No problem. ... The bike is an older MTB and at the time was a top of the range race bike. It has a full XT gear set and is quite light at 10kg. . Not bad for a steel bike from the early 1990's. lol. .. I know I can get a comparable bike which is more suited to my new needs. .. But as I dont get out too often. ... Hope this year will change that. . I dont see the point for now as I have another one the same make but a bit more relaxed to ride but needs a good service and tyre swap as it has road slicks on it at the moment. .. Geometry and how bikes are sized for MTB has changed. .. I was told it was about stand over height. ... so the frame is small and the seat post long, the steerer is actually short and the reach to the bars is quite long. .. the photo just makes the steerer look long but it is very flat. ... I have about 4 to 5 inches of stand over height when I am flat on the ground so there is a lot of air under me. .. But it was supposed to be the perfect size. ... Now I have my collar bone issue. .. size is less important in this case. ... Just need a bit more comfort. .. haha

 

img1245vr.jpg

Edited by morepower

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Hi morepower. 10kgs !!!. My Claud is 10. 25kgs and that is a 53cm Aluminium frame with carbon forks and a triple set of Stronglight Alloy rings and Thorn 140mm cranks. I ride on Ragida Nova and Vittoria Rubino slicks.

If I listened to the experts and had one based on 'Stand Over' height I would be riding the first junior size without pedals directly driving the front wheel (a tricycle). I only have a 23&1/2" inside leg.

Edited by TheTravellingRooster

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img1245vr.jpg

 

Hi morepower. 10kgs !!!. My Claud is 10. 25kgs and that is a 53cm Aluminium frame with carbon forks and a triple set of Stronglight Alloy rings and Thorn 140mm cranks. I ride on Ragida Nova and Vittoria Rubino slicks.

If I listened to the experts and had one based on 'Stand Over' height I would be riding the first junior size without pedals directly driving the front wheel (a tricycle). I only have a 23&1/2" inside leg.

 

I admit I was shocked how light it was it is 10. ?? Kg. .. I forget but I know it is sub 11kg. ... it has a magnesium stem, smattering of Titanium and other light weight bits. ... Plus that frame is small. ... I am a shortarse leg wise. .. I had a diamond back before that but when I was racing I was sponsored both by the importer and the local dealer so I got some really good stuff. .... lol. ... I love my Frog peddles and these have titanium shafts. ..

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I admit I was shocked how light it was it is 10. ?? Kg. .. I forget but I know it is sub 11kg. ... it has a magnesium stem, smattering of Titanium and other light weight bits. ... Plus that frame is small. ... I am a shortarse leg wise. .. I had a diamond back before that but when I was racing I was sponsored both by the importer and the local dealer so I got some really good stuff. .... lol. ... I love my Frog peddles and these have titanium shafts. ..

 

Hi again morepower. I am (was) unfamiliar with Frog Pedals. I have three pairs of 'frog !!' pedals that I thought were light. I still ride Traditional leather shoes (Vittoria) and alloy plates with my Marcel Berthet Lyotard Platfom pedals.

My oldest pair are circa 1965 and the more recent ones were new old stock from the early days of spanner and or Allen Key fastenings.

They still run as smooth as silk.

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I love the extra float of the Speedplay frogs as my legs are a bit twisted and bent. .lol. . I couldnt get on with the Shimano peddles. I think I got the first ones in the country and did have to modify my Sidi shoes. If I remember rightly the peddles are just over 100gr each and the cleats which are the actual mech for the peddles is minimal too. ... The ITM stem was another item that it has too. .. I know they now do carbon and forged alloys but magesium was the in thing at the time and I think they stopped selling them a year or so later due to corrosion issues and being incompatable with other metals. It was one really trick bike for some bike racer who just used to use it for a bit of training. It would have made a good bike for someone who was going to race it cross country at that time. But it shows how good the components are if you buy quality as it is still as smooth as it was when I first got it. ..... lol. .

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I've still not been out on my bike this year yet :ph34r: - but still doing spinning classes 4 times a week!

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I can see the appeal of the tandem; not least I could keep up with the wife!

But it is transporting it that inhibits us looking further. I don't warm to using either the car roof, particularly way up on the Disco, or a van rear rack. What's considered the optimum solution?

 

I carry mine on a Citreon Berlingo using a specially designed roof rack with gas filled strut to help lift the weight - this will be near the same height as a Disco I'm guessing. However, if you take the wheels off most tandems will fit into an estate car. It's also possible to have couplings built into the frame which allow it to be split into two thus aiding transport. This is a more expensive option and tends to be seen on the higher priced frames.

Edited by mw3230

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I've still not been out on my bike this year yet :ph34r: - but still doing spinning classes 4 times a week!

 

Dont worry. .... It was blooming cold and slippy. ..... haha. ..... There will be loads of time to get muddy and cold still before summer arrives and you get muddy but stay warm. ...lol

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I admit I was shocked how light it was it is 10. ?? Kg. .. I forget but I know it is sub 11kg. ... it has a magnesium stem, smattering of Titanium and other light weight bits. ... Plus that frame is small. ... I am a shortarse leg wise. .. I had a diamond back before that but when I was racing I was sponsored both by the importer and the local dealer so I got some really good stuff. .... lol. ... I love my Frog peddles and these have titanium shafts. ..

 

I bought a Cannondale SuperSix Hi Mod with SRAM Red last year and its just over 7kgs, still need to peddle the thing up hills though :unsure: Just wating for some nice weather to get back out on it it has been in the Garage since October

 

My MTB is a Carbon Hardtail Cannondale XTR/XT and that is around 22lbs, I used that today and it goes well along the cycle tracks in Durham it can also keep up with many road bikes on tarmac.

 

 

Richard. ..

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My bike's a Courier (something) and a bit thinner tyres than my last one although I don't fancy one with the extra thin tyres, big chunky ones I usually have! I'll get a pic up of my bike sometime

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Hi mechs. If you are riding on 700C's there is a decent choice of widths/footprint. My own are 700Cx23 but they are road race/road hybrid tyres. For a comfortable ride without the massive effort of riding Knobbly Tyres have a look at 700Cx28's. I am building a hybrid road bike based on a Carrera Valour for one of my daughters. I am going to fit it out with 700Cx28's. She uses it mainly for town & local riding and very occasional tow-path riding (Leeds-Liverpool canal in the Wigan area).

It is often necessary to change inner tubes when changing tyre sizes but there is a small tolerance in each tyre/rim combination.

The chunkier and wider the tyre the more effort is needed to propel the bike but a regular road tyre on a front suspension mountain bike can make for a deceptively quick lump.

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Sounds interesting TTR. .... Just riding on trails and not going too far off the beaten track would be good for 700c tyres. . I am still unsure where I will get to ride locally at the moment. .. I would concider a hybrid bike if I dont get too far off the road and have a bike that would be fine for some road miles too. ... The tyres I have on mine are quite soft compound so on road they are both harder work and wear out quickly. ... I know I can put some road based tyres on the bike. ... I may look at putting a suspended front end into the bike. ... But do worry it will kick out the front end and slow the steering as my frame was not designed for suspnsion. ..

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Sounds interesting TTR. .... Just riding on trails and not going too far off the beaten track would be good for 700c tyres. . I am still unsure where I will get to ride locally at the moment. .. I would concider a hybrid bike if I dont get too far off the road and have a bike that would be fine for some road miles too. ... The tyres I have on mine are quite soft compound so on road they are both harder work and wear out quickly. ... I know I can put some road based tyres on the bike. ... I may look at putting a suspended front end into the bike. ... But do worry it will kick out the front end and slow the steering as my frame was not designed for suspnsion. ..

 

Hi Morepower. My youngest brother swears by Zaska. He has a Zaska GT,it is a very limited edition version and his eldest son also has one,the ones with the very definitely must have frame/fork set-up.

He bought two from an Asian chap (in Derby I think) at a time some years back when they were not cheap. The guy nearly dropped cork legged when he gave the bike the once over,he took it for a short spin and promptly said I have two please.

Not my "cup of tea" at all,but each to their own.

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I admit I do like some of the Whyte hybrids. ..... will see how this year pans out. ...... lol. ...

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Thanks for the info, i'll check the tyres :) Not got a photo of mine up yet but this is it http://www. edinburghbicycle. com/comms/site_sizing/product-reviews/revolution-courier-race/edinburgh-courier-reviews. htm

 

It's a good enough bike for me, the one I have up the caravan has thicker tyres on it and again good enough for me but just an Asda one from years ago and it's pink :lol:

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sons just purchased a moda road bike loveley bike all carbon fibre very very expensive though

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Although I'd always had a bike for doing those little jobs around the village I took advantage of the Ride2Work scheme and bought a new Mountain Bike in 2010 (Carrera Kraken). Because I didnt know what I wanted to do - I threw lots of "kit" on it and turned it into a touring bike with urban tyres.

 

I started riding around the "perimeter track" at work (I work on an airfield) doing 6 miles each Lunchtime. Within a few months, a group of colleagues had gathered to do the same sort of "Fitness" interest and we all went around together for a giggle. Two of the more professional cyclists then said to me "Fancy going around again?" So I did - and enjoyed the increased distance a lot.

 

So I looked on the internet and found a local route that I could call back fo help from and one saturday I did it! 30 miles and 3 hours - I was really impressed with myself! I started doing that route saturdays and sundays until one day I felt so good that I had a bowl of Cornflkes and then went on the back route - doing 60 miles that day.

 

I did the Norwich 50 and that same year I also rode the Hadrians Wall cycle route (Heck - HILLS!) I have now bought a Road Bike - A Raleigh 100 - from e-bay for 1/2 price and I can now do the 30-mile route in just under two hours.

 

This year my standard route is to Cromer and back (48 miles) and the Norwich 100 is booked. ..

 

. ..and I luv it! :rolleyes:

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Although I'd always had a bike for doing those little jobs around the village I took advantage of the Ride2Work scheme and bought a new Mountain Bike in 2010 (Carrera Kraken). Because I didnt know what I wanted to do - I threw lots of "kit" on it and turned it into a touring bike with urban tyres.

 

I started riding around the "perimeter track" at work (I work on an airfield) doing 6 miles each Lunchtime. Within a few months, a group of colleagues had gathered to do the same sort of "Fitness" interest and we all went around together for a giggle. Two of the more professional cyclists then said to me "Fancy going around again?" So I did - and enjoyed the increased distance a lot.

 

So I looked on the internet and found a local route that I could call back fo help from and one saturday I did it! 30 miles and 3 hours - I was really impressed with myself! I started doing that route saturdays and sundays until one day I felt so good that I had a bowl of Cornflkes and then went on the back route - doing 60 miles that day.

 

I did the Norwich 50 and that same year I also rode the Hadrians Wall cycle route (Heck - HILLS!) I have now bought a Road Bike - A Raleigh 100 - from e-bay for 1/2 price and I can now do the 30-mile route in just under two hours.

 

This year my standard route is to Cromer and back (48 miles) and the Norwich 100 is booked. ..

 

. ..and I luv it! :rolleyes:

 

Hi Rigga. Good on you. It is the finest thing that you could do for your Cardio Vascular system. When Winter arrives remember,there is no such thing as bad weather---only the wrong gear.

I am 66yrs of age and still get out but I really feel the damp and cold in my Arthritic Bones. My Winter cycling will hopefully be in Spain on the Costa Blanca in the Alicante region before I am much older and can't get my leg over the bike.

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I'm 67 and ride regularly - usually about 4 days a week averaging around 45 miles a day in winter & 55 in summer. The ride usually includes a cafe or pub stop where local cyclists meet - most of these are in their 70s, quite a few in their 80s, nearly all club (ex-racing) cyclists. There's around half a dozen who are also caravanners or motorhome owners. I'm a great fan of Ribble bikes which provide excellent value for money. Currently riding the 7005 aluminium winter/audax bike but a full carbon Sportive model in summer with Campag Centaur groupset. I've also got a Brian Rourke 531 bike with mudguards which is used for summer wet weather riding. Oh and a Trek Singletrack MTB which doesn't get used much these days. I used to take the bike abroad with the caravan, but got banned after a couple of nasty crashes in the UK which put the wind up the missus as she won't drive abroad! Wonderful hobby - especially up here in the scenic NE. My newest toy is a Garmin GPS computer which records all the details of my rides and which I now record on the PC in an application which plots the course on a map along with the other data. Magic!

 

John M

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Has anyone else noticed a 'Snob element' in cycling? In the summer I ride a very smart Bianchi road bike (wearing matching clothing of course) and find all other road bike riders give me a wave. In the winter I ride a Giant Mountain bike (I don't like the idea of getting the Bianchi wet) and find that in general people riding road bikes ignor me!

Alan

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Has anyone else noticed a 'Snob element' in cycling? In the summer I ride a very smart Bianchi road bike (wearing matching clothing of course) and find all other road bike riders give me a wave. In the winter I ride a Giant Mountain bike (I don't like the idea of getting the Bianchi wet) and find that in general people riding road bikes ignor me!

Alan

 

Hi AlanNancy. Yes,it happens across the country according to some of the sites that I have visited.

I also ride a Bianchi (my ID image),it is now 12yrs old and still looks like I got it for Christmas.

I have been aware that if I am on my other bike(2009 Claud Butler Levante Hybrid Road Bike) I will often get a return nod or limp wave off the Dropped Bar Brigade and a Hearty HI off the MTB & HRB users.

I am 66yrs old and have been riding 'Serious Kit' since I was in my mid teens. That was my 1937 Hetchins Curly (Vibrant Triangle) track bike on fixed wheel. It was fitted with the obligatory front brake for road use and had the cable loosened and the lever taped back for the track nights at Bootle Stadium (Concrete) Liverpool.

In the old days it would be considered bad manners not to nod or wave.

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I'm 67 and ride regularly - usually about 4 days a week averaging around 45 miles a day in winter & 55 in summer. The ride usually includes a cafe or pub stop where local cyclists meet - most of these are in their 70s, quite a few in their 80s, nearly all club (ex-racing) cyclists. There's around half a dozen who are also caravanners or motorhome owners. I'm a great fan of Ribble bikes which provide excellent value for money. Currently riding the 7005 aluminium winter/audax bike but a full carbon Sportive model in summer with Campag Centaur groupset. I've also got a Brian Rourke 531 bike with mudguards which is used for summer wet weather riding. Oh and a Trek Singletrack MTB which doesn't get used much these days. I used to take the bike abroad with the caravan, but got banned after a couple of nasty crashes in the UK which put the wind up the missus as she won't drive abroad! Wonderful hobby - especially up here in the scenic NE. My newest toy is a Garmin GPS computer which records all the details of my rides and which I now record on the PC in an application which plots the course on a map along with the other data. Magic!

 

John M

 

Hi John. Have you had a look into CycleChat?. It is a very lively forum for pedal spinners. It is one of many that I dip into on occasions.

Another one that is lively and very varied is London Fixed Gear & Single Speed. They have a section called Bike Porn,it has produced some quite amazing pieces of Retro Kit,with interesting slants on 'The Cycle' and some pretty amazing projects and some very interesting bikes on the Chimera (real hybrids) themes.

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To me I suppose a bike's a bike. I remember one time though me and my middle son were away on a cycle through the next vilage to get onto the cycle path. So as we were on a thin pavement not many people walk along right next to a 40mph road we had the cycle helmets, high vis jackets. He needed to stop for something, can't remember what but he was in front of me and I was behind.

 

So we stopped and I made dure his helmet was ok, said to him to keep going until we got to the opening then turn, i'd be behind, bla bla and mid conversation he said "Oh look Mum there's a REAL cyclist", waved and got a wave back.

 

This guy was on the other side of the road in his "proper" cycling gear, goggle things over his eyes, the cycle trousers that look like leggings, high vis vest, helmet etc the works - and it was a bike with skinny wheels.

 

So at the time he was about 8 and even he noticed we weren't "real" cyclists :D

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To me I suppose a bike's a bike.

 

Hi mechs. No, a bike is not always simply a bike. Try and have a spin on a modern 6061 aluminium frame with Cro-moly forks or better still one with carbon forks. This is often a combination for a Road Hybrid Bike (running on 700cx23,25 or 28 tyres),the carbon forks can reduce the weight by about 1. 2 kgs. The law of physics dictates that the heavier a cycle is the more energy is need to propel it and when climbing can make it really hard work.

There are many different weighs of reducing weight under pedal power that is one of the reasons why pro cyclists often look so lithe,body mass is a big issue when climbing.

Mega silly money can and often is spent in the pursuit of lightness of steed but the very basics in my opinion start with sensible spending on a product that can be upgraded and also made lighter whilst at the same time the power pack(cyclist)gets its own upgrade by loosing a little of the weight being hauled about.

I don't know what your budget might be if there is one for a possible change of steed but I have just built a Hybrid Road Bike based on a Saracen Tour (dropped bars) that weighs in at 10. 65kgs (temporary steel triple rings and cranks) with 24spd Shimano on board for £205. 00. Everything came off E'bay some new but mostly pre-owned.

 

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I agree with you TTR. .. My first mountain bike was a cheap Diamond Back and I had it for about 4 or 5 months before it died. .. It was second hand and just to see if I could get out and enjoy riding again as I had stopped riding push bikes when I hit 16 and could ride motorbikes /mopeds. I then got my current Checker Pig which was also a ridgid bike but loads lighter and made riding more of a pleasure especially the hills the rides were a lot easier just because I had less weight to haul round not just peddaling but steering and pushing if we had to push or carry the bikes in places. ... The components went from budget to almost top of the range too. .. So less problems with adjustment and just much nicer to use generallly. . I did add quite a few light weight parts to the bike as time went by but the biggest gain was just getting the lighter bike the weight saving was not a dramatic change but would have helped.

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