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WandrinAndy

Replacing Bailey 12V Charger 20 Amp Transformer - Is This A Diy Job?

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The 12v power unit on my Series-5 Bailey Ranger seems to have gone on the blink. The 240v supply still works fine but the 12v side of things is dead. I understand the faulty unit is probably a PS276-1-BC so have just bought a replacement from eBay which should be delivered this coming week.

 

http://www. ebay. co. uk/itm/CARAVAN-12V-CHARGER-20-AMP-TRANSFORMER-MOTORHOME-/180749980221?_trksid=p4340. m185&_trkparms=algo%3DDLSL%252BSIC. NPJS%26its%3DI%26itu%3DUCI%252BUA%26otn%3D10%26pmod%3D120695752373%252B120695752373%26po%3D%26ps%3D63%26clkid%3D4475627715906059878

 

The replacement unit apparently comes with instructions, but was wondering whether anybody has replaced such a unit themselves, and whether this is a relatively simple DIY job?

 

Thanks,

Andy

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The 12v power unit on my Series-5 Bailey Ranger seems to have gone on the blink. The 240v supply still works fine but the 12v side of things is dead. I understand the faulty unit is probably a PS276-1-BC so have just bought a replacement from eBay which should be delivered this coming week.

 

http://www. ebay. co. u. ..627715906059878

 

The replacement unit apparently comes with instructions, but was wondering whether anybody has replaced such a unit themselves, and whether this is a relatively simple DIY job?

 

Thanks,

Andy

 

 

Hi Andy

 

I replaced the PSU on my Bailey Senator Arizona earlier this year. I got one from ebay too.

 

I imagine the set-up in your 'van is similar to the one in my 'van.

 

This is how I remember the job.

 

Obviously begin by disconnecting the mains hookup and the main leads from the battery before doing any work on the PSU/fusebox

 

In mine it was then a matter of removing the front panel of the unit which houses the fuses in the underbed box - it's held one with bolts which are obvious. Removing the panel was more difficult than it sounds as the bed box seemed to have been installed AFTER the fusebox and so the cupwashers and screws securing the bedbox to the floor obstructed getting the front panel out. After I managed to get the panel out, replacing the PSU was relatively easy.

 

The old one has to be slid out of its space in the fusebox housing. There is a "kettle-type" plug on the mains lead and 2X12 volt wires from the battery. that have to be disconnected. The kettle plug had been secured in place with a cable tie in my 'van. Replacement is just the reverse of this process, ie, replugging the mains and 12 volt leads (spade connectors) and then sliding the PSU back into the housing. It is a good idea to note the exact position of the old PSU on its "rails" before you remove it as if it's like mine it was quite a tight fit in the housing and it was important to get it just right.

 

After I had replaced the PSU with the new one I then replaced the front panel . A small point I removed the cup washers and countersunk the furniture screws that had obstructed front panel of the fuse box before I replaced the cover. When the panel was back in place I reconnected the battery terminals and then the mains ehu lead and everything worked fine.

 

I am no electrician but I was just careful to ensure that I did not do any work until the mains ehu and battery were disconnected. and did not reconnect them until the PSU was connected up and the fuse box cover front panel back in place.

 

I hope I have remembered everything it was quite a straightforward swap as I remember it.

 

I hope this helps. PM me if you have any specific queries when you're doing the job.

 

Best wishes

Tim

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Hi Andy

 

I've just looked at your ebay picture and that's helped my aged memory a little more!!!

 

The 12v leads have a "special" connector, not spade connectors, just plug the PSU "connector" into the matching one in the 'van. You do not need the mains "kettle" plug lead as shown in the picture as you will already have one wired into your 'van. Again just plug the one wired into the 'van into the matching socket on the front of the PSU

 

Tim

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. ........... Removing the panel was more difficult than it sounds as the bed box seemed to have been installed AFTER the fusebox and so the cupwashers and screws securing the bedbox to the floor obstructed getting the front panel out. ...........

 

Many thanks for your detailed response Tim.

 

Like you, I am also no electrician but figured that replacing a pre-installed unit might be within my level of competence, and you have given me the confidence to tackle it myself.

 

As you mention, it's all very well for them in the factory following their easy installation sequence, but boy do I wish they would give some thought to post-installation maintenance! My 'van has been without hot water for a couple of years because I have yet to fathom out how to get sufficient access to my faulty Truma Ultrastore without removing the entire rear bed box!

 

Cheers,

Andy

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I too have just bought one from ebay to replace the faulty one on my Indiana. Obviously you have to remove the fuse box cover to facilitate this then it is just a matter of unplugging the the leads, sliding the old one out then sliding the new one in and reconnecting the leads. It's a very simple operation once you get the fusebox cover off as I too had the same difficulty as Big Tim.

Edited by Fellwanderer

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I have yet to fathom out how to get sufficient access to my faulty Truma Ultrastore without removing the entire rear bed box!

 

Cheers,

Andy

 

May be you should post a new Question to see if someone can help with that. :)

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Andy

 

I realise that you have already bought your charger but (just in case you can return it for a refund) - check a very simple fault that I had and know that others have had too.

 

Essentially, the charger side of the unit is connected to the main transformer body by the black kettle lead. These often come out or loose due to vibrations etc. All I needed to do was push it back in and everything worked perfectly. To access it, you need to take the cover off the charger init which is a very simple job - you can easily see the recessed screws in the body. You will probably have to disconnect the leads from the back too but these clip in with connector blocks so thats simple as well.

 

You will know if this has worked because as soon as you switch the mains on, you will hear the fan on the charger unit kick in.

 

Might help someone else

Edited by Arora

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I had a similar situation to Arora on our Series5 Senator - no 12v services as battery was flat. Took cover off mains box With same difficulties re screw access!) under side bed/seat and discovered the charger lead had come adrift! Re-attached the lead and have had no problems since (fingers now firmly crossed!).

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My Senator also had the Kettle Plug work loose.

 

Pushed it back in place and fixed it down with Duct Tape and it has now been fine the last 4 years!

 

HTH

 

G.

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As I said in my earlier posts my "kettle" plug was held in place with a long cable tie which encircled the PSU and the plug so that it could only be removed by cutting the cable tie. As I bought my 'van nearly new, ie, before its first service I guess that Bailey had recognised the "plug workig loose" problem and offered a solution, albeit rather a rather "Heath Robinson" one. I replaced the cable tie with a new one when I changed the PSU. Appart from the fact that my "kettle" plug couldn't work loose I checked and tested all the connections with a multimeter BEFORE buying a new PSU.

 

I have noticed that the new PSU runs VERY hot and is not well ventilated which my explain why the old one failed after a relatively short life. I read somewhere that the makers of the PSU had "upped" the current being drawn before the PSU's cooling fan started because people complained about the noise of the fan when they were trying to sleep. This means that unless a large current is being drawn the fan does not cut in and the PSU runs hot. I think I'd rather have got used to the fan rather than change the expensive PSU too frequently!!!!

 

In addition the housing for the PSU above the fuse box is badly designed as it so poorly ventilated. It is not however easy to move the PSU as it would entail rewiring work which is beyond my skills.

 

Regarding the tight fit of the front panel of the fuse box, as I said previously, I just removed the cup washer which were obstructing removing the panel and screwed the scews further into the wooden rail. of the bed box - sorted.

 

Tim

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Thanks for the heads up on the loose kettle plug chaps. I will check the kettle plug when I open the box after the replacement unit arrives, but in my instance the 'van is on a seasonal pitch and hasn't moved in yonks. The 12v lamps were working fine on Thursday night, but dead on Friday night. And I suspect I may have contributed to the unit's demise by leaving an effectively dead battery connected while being on permanent EHU for many months.

 

Andy

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Its my understanding that the unit takes a current of 12amps before the fan comes on.

 

My 2004 senator PSU wasn't fitted into the PDU, but was separate.

 

I modified the mounting of the unit by packing the mounting screws of the wood back plate by about 10mm, this allowed air to circulate air all round the unit.

 

The PSU/Charger/unit was still working after 7 years, that speaks for itself.

 

With the Unicorn the unit is fitted inside the PDU, because of the warranty i have for the present left it inside the box, but i have drilled two 50mm cooling holes through the back.

 

I'm still not satisfied that the cooling is sufficient, so when the unit is out of warranty it will get removed outside.

 

I believe the unit is only fitted inside to aid the production line.

Edited by xtrailman

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I got very worried on our last trip around Europe because the PSU was so very hot especially in the evenings when pulling more amps for lighting, TV etc. I carry a high power 12v fan which I played onto the PSU to try to cool it as I was worried it might go up in flames!!

As OP states above the air circulation with the PSU under the seat is not ideal - I used to keep the underseating door open in the evenings to assist cooling. But all in all not a good design feature!!

 

I have since added a spare charger unit into the "spares kit" to ensure we do not have 12v failure whilst away touring Europe as on my last trip I came across several Bailey owners who had failures and could not use their motor movers or any other 12v equipment.

I know one of these it turned out to be the "kettle plug" which had worked loose - so well worth checking this first if you have a problem.

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Fitted a couple of these units to my Bailey Louisiana which was traded in a year back,both units were getting very hot when in use. The ventalation under the lounge seating was a factor, so extra vents were placed on the side of the seat plus lmproved vent in the floor area.

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I've got one of these in my new Swift (I think). Does anyone know how safe it is to run a generator thru it? I'm worried in case the unstable nature of a generator output and/or voltage fluctuation damages the electronics. In doubt, I might be inclined to use the 12v output on the genny direct to the battery.

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Actually, on checking, it's a Seargent that's now fitted to my Swift!

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I've got one of these in my new Swift (I think). Does anyone know how safe it is to run a generator thru it? I'm worried in case the unstable nature of a generator output and/or voltage fluctuation damages the electronics. In doubt, I might be inclined to use the 12v output on the genny direct to the battery.

I would suggest you read the Sargeant instruction manual regarding use of generators.

 

http://sargentshop. co. uk/epages/eshop328964. sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/eshop328964/Categories/ShopHome/Power

 

Brian

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very easy to replace but the price from the link to ebay is expensive

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The PSU on my pageant 5 failed last month, circuit board looked like it had been getting very hot!!!!!!! (Fan only starts if PSU is producing more than 8 amps.) Very little ventilation inside the underseat locker.

I have fitted two small 12v computer graphic card fans either end of the replacment PSU this produces a nice through flow of air.

Also Increased the ventilation in the electrical box and added a on/off switch outside the under seat locker.

The 12v feed to the fans is controlled by a 240v relay so won't drain the caravan battery when not on mains hook up.

Will see if this works in the spring once the weather gets warmer.

Jamie

Edited by Wits

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Guy's

I am currently experiencing the same issue, I have had the PSU repaired and just this weekend replaced two 15amp fuses covering the rear lighting and toilet flush. Both fuses had been nearly melted. Not sure where to go next with this I am considering replacing the whole unit. Any ideas ? Indiana S5 2006. Seasonal pitch no leisure battery fitted.

Thanks in advance

Steve

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Guest jks

Guy's

I am currently experiencing the same issue, I have had the PSU repaired and just this weekend replaced two 15amp fuses covering the rear lighting and toilet flush. Both fuses had been nearly melted. Not sure where to go next with this I am considering replacing the whole unit. Any ideas ? Indiana S5 2006. Seasonal pitch no leisure battery fitted.

Thanks in advance

Steve

 

I would fit a leisure battery as you are probably asking a lot of the charger unit to feed all your 12volt system. Not surprised that your fuses have melted. A battery will level out the power.

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Thanks JKS,

I'm on it, will let you know,

Rgds

Steve.

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Hi All,

I think I may also have a battery charger problem.

 

My 2006 Ranger 460/4 has no 12v power, lights, pump etc not working, battery indicator at zero. I have checked the for the loose plug problem, but mine is ok. I have also read that some models have an additional fuse behind the battery box but cannot find one.

 

Does anyone know if my van has one?

 

Problem started after the electric heating was left on for a number of hours to air out the van and also an electric blanket on the bed left on, so it's possible the charger may have overheated if the load drawn was too high.

 

I have the battery on an external charger at the moment.

Am I correct in assuming that if the charger has failed that even a fully charged battery will not make any difference?

Is the charger also a transformer? If not why do lights etc not work when the van is on mains power?

 

Thanks,

 

Bob

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The best thing to do is check that you have 240 AC volts approx on the kettle plug, and 13. 7 volts DC on the red and black output wires from the charger, test the output with some load on such as lights.

 

It could just be a blown 12 volt fuse.

 

On my 2004 bailey they was no fuse near the battery box, my 2011 does.

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Thanks for the response, I'll try as you suggest. I am reluctant to order a new charger until I am certain the old one is U/S.

All the fuses in the under-bed unit are OK and I can't find any others.

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