Jump to content

Wheel Nuts


rembrandt
 Share

Recommended Posts

Absolute rubbish.

Most cars have alloy wheels, do you change the wheel nuts every time you change a tyre? NO

 

A caravan is no different.

 

As long as they have not been over tightened (torqued) they will outlast the caravan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I expect you have heard of ONE-SHOT nuts but they are different as they hold the hub to the axle.

Ford C-Max and Coachman Festival 380/2 SE 2006    Motto  Carpe Diem

Still trying to find the perfect pitch. ..110 amp Battery+ 65 watt roof mounted Solar and 25 watt Wind Turbine. LED lighting. Status Aerial 315. Loose chattels marked with UV,. Safefill Gas Fitted.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In some cases if you replace alloy wheels with steel wheels you need to change the nuts due to the thinner steel wheel

 

 

Merc did this having alloys fitted and a steel wheel spare you had a bag of bolts to use on the steel rim . If you did not fit the different bolts because they are longer they went through the hub inside into the braking mechanism .

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first caravan I bought with alloys was a 2005 Abbey Spectrum, the van came new with a steel spare wheel and with that was a set of wheel bolts, which we labelled for use with steel wheel only and the salesman made a point of also telling me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As mentioned the hubs on most Alko chassis are held on with 'one shot' nuts. These require a 32 mm socket to remove. They CANNOT be reused and new nuts must always be used. The tightening torque is 290 Nm so outside the scope of most DIY torque wrenches. THis means it is usally a dealer job.

 

Wheel nuts come in 2 types although they look the same in size and pitch. Normal wheel nuts with a tensile strength of 8. 8 are used with steel wheels and are tightened to 65 lb/ft. If you have alloy wheels a stronger tensile bolt (10. 9) is used and is tightened to 85 lb/ft. However, if you have alloys and a steel spare then the same alloy wheel nuts can be used for the spare but tighten them to 65 lb/ft.

 

Check with your manufacturer if your van came with alloys for the correct torque as at least one maker has started to advise a higher tightening torque on certain new vans due to some issues with wheels coming loose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brian,

 

I am sure they are supplied with the best of intentions but you can use alloy bolts of the correct length and profile if you wish. As a stronger bolt why not? Just match the correct torque to avoid distorting the wheel socket. Of course never use the steel bolts on alloys as you vcannot get them tight enough without damaging the bolt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brian,

 

I am sure they are supplied with the best of intentions but you can use alloy bolts of the correct length and profile if you wish. As a stronger bolt why not? Just match the correct torque to avoid distorting the wheel socket. Of course never use the steel bolts on alloys as you vcannot get them tight enough without damaging the bolt

Lunar supply bolts of a different length and different tapered locking surface area.

The bolts from the alloy wheels are not compatible with the spare steel wheel.

Probably best to fit the correct sized bolts as supplied by Lunar don't really want the spare to be a rattling good fit.

Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have heard that if you take off an alloy wheel you can't re-use the wheelnuts but have to replace them with new ones. Does anybody know if this is true ?

 

 

are you on about going from steel wheels to alloys then you canot use the nuts/bolts.

 

Sorry but Yes you can, if you have a Coachman and you use the same Bolts/Nuts and Steel Wheel originally supplied, this comes direct from Coachman, I asked when I collected mine from the factory last month, as this subject has been kicking about on this and other forums

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kiaboy you can't use the bolts from a steel wheel because they are not as strong as the bolts used in alloy wheels.

However you can use the bolts from an alloy wheel to fit a steel wheel providing the bolt profile and dimensions are similiar.

In some Coachmans they are but in some Lunars they are not.

 

The CC magazine has another article in this month issue and again they are causing confusion. CC originally caused the initial confusion and they are supposed to be the experts.

 

Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kiaboy you can't use the bolts from a steel wheel because they are not as strong as the bolts used in alloy wheels.

However you can use the bolts from an alloy wheel to fit a steel wheel providing the bolt profile and dimensions are similiar.

In some Coachmans they are but in some Lunars they are not.

 

The CC magazine has another article in this month issue and again they are causing confusion. CC originally caused the initial confusion and they are supposed to be the experts.

 

Brian

 

Brian,

rembrandt was referring to the Alloy wheel bolts, and that is what my post was based on, if you have alloy's fitted and the spare is the original steel supplied by COACHMAN (no other manufacturer mentioned, as I only have the word of Coachman), then you can use the same bolts, as they are the same profile to enable them to fit the steel, I did not say you could use a steel bolt for an alloy wheel.

 

Hope this resolves any ambiguity.

 

You mention strength regarding steel wheel bolts, so why are the alloys requiring more torque, than the steel ones?? this would imply Alloy wheels are a stronger bolt??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CC originally caused the initial confusion and they are supposed to be the experts.

 

Brian

 

I am sorry to say Brian that with the amount of mistakes the CC make, no one should look upon them as being the experts!

 

Some may say it wrong of me to suggest that the CC is purely a mouthpiece for the NCC and the UK's caravan manufacturers, they also perport to have the interests of their membership at heart and that is an exceptionally questionably aspect for everyone to consider.

 

But back onto the OP, what I would like to know is who supplies the wheel bolts / studs / nuts, is it the chassis manufacturer or is it the supplier of the wheels and tyres?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Brian,

rembrandt was referring to the Alloy wheel bolts, and that is what my post was based on, if you have alloy's fitted and the spare is the original steel supplied by COACHMAN (no other manufacturer mentioned, as I only have the word of Coachman), then you can use the same bolts, as they are the same profile to enable them to fit the steel, I did not say you could use a steel bolt for an alloy wheel.

 

Hope this resolves any ambiguity.

 

You mention strength regarding steel wheel bolts, so why are the alloys requiring more torque, than the steel ones?? this would imply Alloy wheels are a stronger bolt??

Alloy wheels distort more when tensioned. Hence stronger bolts.

I read this on CT somewhere.

Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would have thought that both the alloy wheel bolt and the steel bolt would have a tensile rating of 10. 9, the only differences would be in length and/or the angle of the seating face.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ALKO chassis are normally supplied with steel wheels and appropriate bolts, however a manufacturer may decide to fit alloys as an option and will change the bolts to higher tensile stength ones to suit. The bolt length and pitch depends on the wheel chosen as these are outsourced, but most suppliers have standardised on tthe same length and pitch. They are usually M12 bolts with a lenght of 25. 4 mm and a pitch of 1. 5 mm and are grade 10. 9 tightened to 88 lb/ft Using this torque on a steel wheel could cause distortion and it is also possible the length will cause contact with the brake shoes, so do check. But if they are the same then they can be used on steel wheels but the lower torque of 65 lb/ft should be used.

 

If there is any doubt in your mind and you have alloys and a steel spare, then buy 5 steel bolts from a dealership and carry in the spares box. The low cost will alleviate any concern.

 

Ironically the makers of locking wheel bolts usually state these will suit both alloys and steel, so you takes your choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bolt heads are usually marked with the tensile strength.

 

Standard plated wheel bolts are 8. 8 tensile strength. As plating creates problems when increasing the tensile strength 12. 9 bolts are not plated. This seem to indicate that the special bolts recently introduced which are not plated are 12. 9 t. s. . Anybody got them and tell if there is a 12. 9 marking on the bolt head?

Wheel nuts should suit the bolt strength which raises an interesting point about the thread in the Alko brake drum into which the higher tensile bolt fits.

 

One point missed so far is the fact that there are two usual seatings used for wheels, the widely used 60° taper and the less common spherical base. Some alloy wheels take a flat base bolt head with a loose captive washer.

The torque setting creates a clamping pressure between the wheel face and the hub face. Alloy wheels require a higher clamping force than steel wheels which is why alloys have a higher torque figure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alloy wheels are normally much thicker on the flange than steel so need a longer bolt. Alloy wheels also have a different seating taper to the underside of the head to steel.

 

In cars with a steel spare to replace alloys in the case of a puncture the bolt holes in the spare will have spacers welded on to each hole to allow the original alloy type bolts to be used. I presume from the comments on this site caravan makers don't do this.

 

Some time ago a friend who had replaced his original steel wheels for alloys used his spare when he had a flat. About 2 miles later it fell off as he pulled away from some lights in the middle of Croydon. 3 bolts had hammered the holes out and the 4th bolt snapped. He wondered what the funny noise was. All 4 bolts had bottomed out in the holes without clamping the wheel properly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...