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Bike Rack At Back Of Valencia.


Alan Stanley
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I will be asking Bailey Direct but has anyone had a go at fitting a bike rack to the rear of an Alu-Tech, preferably Valencia Model. Currently we carry the bikes on the top of the car but are considering if this is the best way to do it or would they be better tucked out of the way on the back of the van.

 

No stability pontifications please. been there and got a room full of tee shirts.

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Very interested in the outcome of this topic as I would be interested in one on the back of a pegasus 524. Particularly for a single bike.

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Hi AlanS. I have overcome the problems of keeping them clean,safe and above all else not advertising the fact to others that we have cycles worth nicking on route to our destination.

Chain Reaction Cycles do a rather nice very lightweight single cycle stand. It has an adjustable width provision and will take from 23C right up to Mountain Bike Knobbly tyres.

They are still under £14. 00 each,carriage included. They come flat pack and are easy to assemble and adjust when required.

Our van is an 2001 Elddis Crusader SuperSirocco with OS Fixed lateral bed. With the central half of the bed in the upright position the two bikes drop into the bed box and both facing forward. I have a couple of lightweight covered foam buffers that prevent any chaffing of surfaces. The bed is just behind the rear axle so bouncing around is very unlikely,but in any event I am putting some small brass folding 'D' Rings onto the floor to hook bungee hooks onto.

 

If you go into MY Gallery there are three images that show the rack and how the bike (my Bianchi) fits and stands in the rack. I actually have three of these because I have my Bianchi and a Claud Butler Levante Hybrid Road Bike and my travelling companion Ms Rooster has a Specialised Dolce.

The day may dawn when all three go with us. That is a total of 10. 50kgs + 10. 25kgs + 9. 75kgs = 30. 5kgs and all central and just behind the rear axle.

 

Oh, I forgot to mention. If one is ever unfortunate enough to be rear end shunted because some Plonker Lorry Driver or White Van Man is trying to see what your prides & joys are and fails to stop,squashed bikes don't ride very well!!.

Edited by TheTravellingRooster

Life in general can be a journey of chance with some winners and sadly some losers. Your outfit can never be left to chance. A short-while carrying out essential checks can ensure a long-time of happy & safe caravanning for all concerned.
Ignorance can often be bliss but is certainly not an excuse and when continually disregarded they can be totally disastrous for oneself and the innocent parties.

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I am sorry but I cannot for the life in me see why anyone would want to butcher the back end of a caravan. Could lead to even more potential leaks and help to cause instability.

I know you have to carry them somewhere why not get a 'van with a decent length drawbar like the continentals have and fix them there?

Peter :)

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Hi peterjohn. That is not such a good idea either for the simple reason of the weight on the tow-hitch/rear of the tow-vehicle and above all else it is classed as weight inside the car. It can also be restrictive when tight turns are needed and if bad weather prevails they get all of the rubbish that is drawn up from underneath the tow-vehicle.

Life in general can be a journey of chance with some winners and sadly some losers. Your outfit can never be left to chance. A short-while carrying out essential checks can ensure a long-time of happy & safe caravanning for all concerned.
Ignorance can often be bliss but is certainly not an excuse and when continually disregarded they can be totally disastrous for oneself and the innocent parties.

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Our 2004 Vermont had to have extra factory fitted wood strengtheners, which we ordered FOC at time of ordering.

 

The wood inserts were only to be used with a particular bike rack, it wasn't cheap and measurement showed that the bikes would protruded either side of the caravan, so that and the dirt the bikes would pick up put that idea onto the back burner.

 

We carry our bikes inside the caravan, same as we did with the Vermont.

Edited by xtrailman
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Draw bar or inside the van is not repeat not an option. Will see what Bailey say later.

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Get a Navara or a Mitsibushi raging bull or warrior problem solved, and no problems with the warranty to the van as l am sure Baileys would deffinatley not warranty it with rack on the van. My dealer has already told me any drilling of the outside skin is no no from Baileys and that was just to have a Satallite connection put on. Had to have it put inside the 230v cover.

NigelH

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. ..any drilling of the outside skin is no no from Baileys. ..

Unless you're fitting a fiamma awning, it seems

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Get a Navara or a Mitsibushi raging bull or warrior problem solved, and no problems with the warranty to the van as l am sure Baileys would deffinatley not warranty it with rack on the van. My dealer has already told me any drilling of the outside skin is no no from Baileys and that was just to have a Satallite connection put on. Had to have it put inside the 230v cover.

NigelH

Would solve the bike problem and I could sell the box trailer that I use for rough stuff. But the Grand Kids need corralling in the back of the Sorento on occasions, chucking them onto the load bed would be their idea of fun, but gran and mum would go ballistic.

I didn't think we would use the 7 seat capability for the Sorento that much, but it comes in surprisingly handy. It works particularly well on a six up night out. The Ladies being small go in the back seats and it's nice and quiet up front. Can't believe I just said that.

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We're not all plonkers :angry::):P

 

Hi normskinnormski. I never suggested nor inferred that ALL lorry drivers or White Van Man/Men or Women for that matter were plonkers.

Defend yourself,by all means but you cannot account for the idiots/plonkers that I have encountered on motorways and trunk routes over the years.

Life in general can be a journey of chance with some winners and sadly some losers. Your outfit can never be left to chance. A short-while carrying out essential checks can ensure a long-time of happy & safe caravanning for all concerned.
Ignorance can often be bliss but is certainly not an excuse and when continually disregarded they can be totally disastrous for oneself and the innocent parties.

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Actually mine was tongue and cheek, last time l road a bike l ran into a Fiesta, well actually she cut me up, laid prostrate on the road where she promptly started to ball me out for being a bloody menace. Never thought no more about it until a baby cop yes looked about 21 came knocking at the door telling me l was being prosecuted for reckless riding. Still l had the last laugh it was in the days when good old ICI was experimenting with CCTV, she got done for undue care and attention, now a days l could have sued her for thousands. Sorry to deviate from the real issue but don't do bikes anymore! ha-ha!

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Unless you're fitting a fiamma awning, it seems

 

No Tigger, unless they are fitting the Fiamma awning

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Nope - waiting for Kelly. Failing that will try the Show next week - end.

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Reply from Kelly re-produced here.

 

 

Dear Alan

 

Thank you for your email

 

The research undertaken in conjunction with Bath University recently has suggested that the mounting of cycles on the caravan back panel does have an adverse effect on towing stability and would not be recommended by us.

 

The alternatives are tow bar mounting subject to nose weight limit, roof rack mounting or inside the caravan, unfortunately not areas we can advise on.

 

I trust this is of assistance

 

Kind Regards

 

Kelly Watts

Bailey Helpline

 

Which does not answer the question I asked. i. e. was it possible to fit one.

Not going to waste any more time on this. That'll be a NO then, staying on top of the car.

Edited by Alan Stanley
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l think that answer you would have got from most Caravan Manfactures, not just Bailey.

NigelH

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You see one or two on the back of caravans regularly on the continent and I've yet to hear of it contributing to problems. I was thinking how putting the bikes on the back of my Pegasus 462 would help counter the high nose weight. At the moment we have to put all contents with any significant weight in the rear bathroom in order to get the nose-weight down to below 90 kg. which is the maximum for our car. This includes a spare wheel for our S-max. If Bailey is trying to market their range using the strength of the body as an virtue, surely they could make a rear cycle rack an option. We've got plenty of loading factor as I've gone for the max upgrade as well.

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Surely it’s not the body but the Chassis that would be the problem, to much weight on the back causes it to bow like a Banana, exaggerated l know but that’s the cause. The heaviest things should be just aft of the axle which should counter balance the nose weight. In my Lunar Clubman SE only needed to drag the Awning slightly aft of the axle to see the nose weight change on the Melenco nose weight gauge.

NigelH

.

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I'd be kind of upset if chassis limitations were a consideration. As I'll admit to being in the 100 kgs area and SWIMBO gets close to the 55 kgs. That would mean that neither of us could use the bathroom, let alone both at the same time to say nothing of the potential weight of the Toilet and contents. Add to that the lotions and potions that we carry (bless her) and we would be in real trouble. No chassis strength is not a consideration.

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Surely it’s not the body but the Chassis that would be the problem, to much weight on the back causes it to bow like a Banana, exaggerated l know but that’s the cause. The heaviest things should be just aft of the axle which should counter balance the nose weight. In my Lunar Clubman SE only needed to drag the Awning slightly aft of the axle to see the nose weight change on the Melenco nose weight gauge.

NigelH

.

 

 

Hi Nidge4. People are talking about hanging cycles on the back of a caravan,not Motorcycles. Further more the issue is about the internal structure of the rear panel not any link to the rear chassis cross beam. For any load mounted on the rear panel to affect the rear cross beam there would have to be uprights bolted or welded on the beam.

If the caravan manufacturing industry was remotely interested in providing for cycle transportation it would need to be achieved with a 'Garage' area as was/is incorporated on some of the Sprite models. The idea of having a 'garage' is often a compromise. They are positioned at the very rear and form part of a double bunk arrangement.

One way of overcoming the obvious compromise would be to build the garage into/onto the rear of a longer chassis. A typical Twin Axle is 600mm longer than the shorter but comparable Single Axle layout. If the Single Axle layout was built onto the longer chassis and into the longer body and the 'Spare Room' as such could be developed as a garage for cycles or any thing that is relatively lightweight.

Life in general can be a journey of chance with some winners and sadly some losers. Your outfit can never be left to chance. A short-while carrying out essential checks can ensure a long-time of happy & safe caravanning for all concerned.
Ignorance can often be bliss but is certainly not an excuse and when continually disregarded they can be totally disastrous for oneself and the innocent parties.

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Travelling Rooster l know most cycles today are light weight but l was always told never load a trailer with to much weight at the back, cause instability, that’s with any trailer not just caravans. If l am wrong can someone explain what’s changed, rule of thumb always have the weight forward of axles never aft.

I have caravanned since the early eighties admittedly came back to caravanning in 2004 after a 15 year break and the difference from those latter 15 years were remarkable but one thing remains, always load your caravan to the makers diagram, look at the first pagers of all your service manuals it shows a diagram how to load your caravan, never have l seen in those diagrams anything hooked on the back.

If Baileys, Swift, Lunar, Coachman or the NCC tell me different, l will always load how l have been taught and not try and add to a Manufactures specification, after all lives’ are at stake.

NigelH

Edited by Nidge4
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Travelling Rooster l know most cycles today are light weight but l was always told never load a trailer with to much weight at the back, cause instability, that’s with any trailer not just caravans. If l am wrong can someone explain what’s changed, rule of thumb always have the weight forward of axles never aft.

I have caravanned since the early eighties admittedly came back to caravanning in 2004 after a 15 year break and the difference from those latter 15 years were remarkable but one thing remains, always load your caravan to the makers diagram, look at the first pagers of all your service manuals it shows a diagram how to load your caravan, never have l seen in those diagrams anything hooked on the back.

If Baileys, Swift, Lunar, Coachman or the NCC tell me different, l will always load how l have been taught and not try and add to a Manufactures specification, after all lives’ are at stake.

NigelH

 

 

Hi Nidge4. I don't know whether you have misunderstood my post or misread it. I am not advocating hanging cycles on the back of a caravan. I have always decried & questioned the logic and not least of all with the layouts as presented from the factory.

I am referring to an area at the rear of the body dedicated to cycle storage,Swift Group did this a number of years ago but only on Single Axle chassis.

On a Twin axle with a regular single axle layout installed in the frontal portion as it would be in the single axle it would leave circa 520mm for a Garage the weight is already forward and supported by Twin Axles no One because all of the weight stuff is shove up towards the front. The garage could be made to a height of approx' 1. 2mtrs and from the inside of the van it would produce a shelved area,with or without fronted cupboards this would become usable space for lightweight bulky items such as bedding.

I put out a request on the dedicated Swift Owners forum being that the caravans that I recalled as having a 'Garage' were from the Swift Group',as I recall they were all on Single Axle chassis. In my view that was taking 'Compromise' a little too far.

I am in the throws of putting some ideas on the Drawing Board as I did some years ago but with another/different project.

For obvious reasons, the longer and lighter the Donor Model is the better. I am currently looking at an older ( 2000/2005 Compass Corona or Rallye or even an Elddis Avante.

Life in general can be a journey of chance with some winners and sadly some losers. Your outfit can never be left to chance. A short-while carrying out essential checks can ensure a long-time of happy & safe caravanning for all concerned.
Ignorance can often be bliss but is certainly not an excuse and when continually disregarded they can be totally disastrous for oneself and the innocent parties.

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