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Stabilisers Blade Or Ball


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Hello i am recently new to caravanning and was wondering which would be in peoples opinion the best stabiliser to buy.

 

I have seen either the bulldog 200Q blade or the Alko 3004

 

I think that the Alko looks like it would be alot less hassle as its seems like one simple engaging and disengaging operation but i just dont know.

 

any advice or comments much appreciated

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The Bulldog is cheaper but the Alko is the accepted leader at this time, it stops both pitching and snaking and is easier to use. I would not change my alko for a Bulldog. Peter :rolleyes:

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so they must be good.

 

 

But so is a well set up leaf spring type. I used a Scott stabilizer for the first 30 years of my caravanning, and an Alko and a Winterhoff for the remainder. True, the Alko is probably quicker to put in place, but on the road, both types are equally good.

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

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I used a Bulldog blade type stabiliser for many years and found it very good. However, the more modern Alko / Winterhoff type are much more convenient to use.

 

 

John.

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Alko is dearer but better. :) I have used both and the Ball System is easier to use.

 

The blade can come adrift on leaving a bumpy site and needs checking once out on the road. :(

 

Whatever you fit you still need to balance the van properly. ;)

Ford C-Max and Coachman Festival 380/2 SE 2006    Motto  Carpe Diem

Still trying to find the perfect pitch. ..110 amp Battery+ 65 watt roof mounted Solar and 25 watt Wind Turbine. LED lighting. Status Aerial 315. Loose chattels marked with UV,. Safefill Gas Fitted.

 

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Like others I used blade type stabilisers for years perfectly satisfactorily. However when I got my first caravan with an AlKo I was not sad. For one thing I did not have to find somewhere for the blade type whilst on site or at home as the AlKo is completely self contained on the van. Blade types are fine if you are perfectly fit but if you have any back/leg problems they do require a certain amount of physical strength to engage. Don't forget if you go for the AlKo type you will need a towball with a longer neck if you have a fixed towbar. Swan necks are usually fine as they are.

 

David

David - Milton Keynes

Bailey Alliance 66-2 Motorhome for holidays and a Kia Venga for home.

 

Caravan Travels

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The Bulldog is cheaper but the Alko is the accepted leader at this time, it stops both pitching and snaking and is easier to use. I would not change my alko for a Bulldog. Peter :rolleyes:

 

 

The blade type stabiliser stops pitching and snaking . The snaking is stopped by the friction plate and the pitching is stopped by the leaf spring . I towed for many number of years in the 70s and 80s and found them good with no problems but as said they need to be fitted on every tow .

 

 

Dave

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I've had a Staymount leaf stabiliser since 1989. It's been on 2 caravans and 5 cars and it seems to perform well. I've had to adjust the tension 3 times in 20-odd years; bathroom scales and 2 x 17mm spanners. Running costs; zero. It's handy for me because I have a gardening trailer as well as the caravan and I don't need to bother about cleaning the ball or getting a special Al-Ko one.

 

No-one's mentioned the running costs of the Al-Ko or Winterhoff stabilisers. They seem to need pads, and servicing and cleaning fairly frequently at whatever cost but granted they are easier to use when hitching up. And if your outfit generates the dreaded black dust which cakes on the pads, no-one wants to know.

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it will also depend on what type of towball you have. if you have a detachable swan neck like mine you can't that i know of use the blade type.

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it will also depend on what type of towball you have. if you have a detachable swan neck like mine you can't that i know of use the blade type.

 

Unless you fit a bulldog clamp-on bracket.

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I used the Bulldog blade-and still have it (!)-though I changed to a Winterhoff, as I felt this to be better engineered than the Alko equivalent at the time. I only did this for convenience of use; I don't detect any operational difference, although the van has always been very stable as a twin axle. I would suspect that the blade would be more effective, particularly against snaking, as the friction pads are flat and possibly of a larger surface area than those gripping a circular towball? However, they do need cleaning to remove compacted dust which can generate a groaning sound, and re-torquing, from time to time.

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Guest Benzowner

I always used the bulldog blade type and personally think they are better than the tow ball type. Winterhoff or ALKO. The only reason I changes was they van I bought had the ALKO one fitted. To say because they are fitted to a lot of vans, they must be good is imo, not really true, there has been a good selling job done. Status aerials are fitted to a lot of vans, the early ones were not good

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Like other I had a blade type (a scot replica) & maintained it by stripping down & removing the dust & the glaze, even changing the pads occasionally,

 

I had a 1300 alko it was handy but not as good as my present winterhoff, I have the alko on my trailer :)

 

as for which is the best, blade or hitch? I was happy with the blade but the hitch is more convenient.

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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I have used a 'Straight-liner ' stabiliser for a few years and found it very good.

It does not work on friction like the others - it has a hydraulic damper same as shock absorbers

No friction means less wear .

When your 50 mm towball becomes 49 mm I think you should replace it.

The best I had was a Trapezeum stabiliser but EU regulations outlawed it

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Because the blade is further off-centre it should be more effective without applying as much force as the ball. The damping effect on yaw and pitch will be different for both of them. Purely as an engineer I would note that the blade is not a damper in the real sense for pitch but it has been in use for longer. The ease of application for the ball is probably the reason for its considerable uptake.

 

With apologies to Lunarman the other question I would ask is how much am I depending on anti-snake at all. No other trailer I have used before I bought the van had one (they seem to be much less common) although with only one exception I have never towed anything else with such a vertical mass component so its probably not a fair comparison.

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Unless you fit a bulldog clamp-on bracket.

just had a look for one unfortunatly only works if you have a round swan neck mine is squareish.

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. .. if you have a detachable swan neck like mine you can't that i know of use the blade type.

You can if you're able to get the bracket to stay put. My Winterhoff detachable is a sort of square tapered section - almost an egg with a flat top & bottom. I had a bit of trouble at first but after clamping the bracket put a piece of steel plate either side & with a short seam weld - bob's your uncle!

 

A pain in the ass I know (before you all have a go) but I own an old Lunar that has an over-run that rotates through 360 degrees. I would have fitted an Alko to the van but their data sheet says that the alko staibilisers are NOT suitable for drawbars that rotate 360 degrees.

 

We've had the discussion on the forum before. nobody (including me) sees any reason according to the laws of physics WHY Alko should say this but I chose to play safe rather than sorry. Plus I have a welder in the garage & the blade type + bracket was cheaper than buying the Alko.

 

And yes. .. the Alko type need replacement pads every so often but the discs on the blade types will eventually wear too.

 

In any event - if you ask yourself "do I need a stabiliser?" the answer is YES YES YES.

 

Which is better? Well get the one that best suits your needs, set up of your van/car/towball.

Edited by RhayaderSax
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