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Motorway Speed Increase


CommanderDave

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I see the speed limit is to be increased to 80 mph by 2013 . Might not be a welcome increase while towing and a van goes past side swiped by their wind at 80 mph . :wacko:

 

 

 

Dave

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There is some debate about increasing Motorway speed limits. I think a 10mph increase for cars would not be wrong in principle but I wonder if we should decrease the speed limit in heavy rain. snow and fog at the same time bring in harsher penalties for drivers who ignore advisory and compulsory speed limits.

Speaking for myself I can find no justification for raising the speed limit when towing a caravan or trailer. I also believe that speed limiters should be fitted to all commercial vehicles with a kerbweight of > 1500kg.

CD makes a good point about the wash from other vehicles at higher speeds passing a car and caravan combination.

 

Regards.

Col

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White van man almost invariably does, but then if the limit increases they will probably drive even faster.

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White van man almost invariably does, but then if the limit increases they will probably drive even faster.

 

I drive a white van at work and seldom reach 70 let alone 80, I know many do ignore the limit but please don't tar us all with the same brush - it's like saying all BMW or Audi drivers are sonthing that rhymes with "bankers"!

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I also believe that speed limiters should be fitted to all commercial vehicles with a kerbweight of > 1500kg.

 

That would cause even more chaos on two lane motorways and dual carriageways as every Transit size van joins the Heavy goods vehicle 'Elephant Racing' community

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Apparently 49% of drivers exceed the 70 mph limit anyway and the only way that the 80 mph limit would work is if it was strictly enforced.

 

Bill

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Was in the Uk last month and on the motorway I ran the cruise control at 72MPH and that gave me 69MPH on my GPS, if I had a pound for every car that flew past me at a much faster speed then me, I would be rich now.

 

I was even overtaken by some 4x4's pulling caravans, I would like to see motorway limit at 80MPH but BIG fines if you go over it.

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I have not seen the details but it would be good to have a review of all speed limits. Not necessarily to increase them all but to establish whether they are all still relevant. Whilst I have no wish to see the towing speed increased on motorways I do wonder if the 50 mph limit on other roads needs reconsidering. The reason a I say that is that the actual roads restrict the speed but there are many stretches of two way trunk roads where a higher speed (same as motorways) would be in order and I suspect would legitimise what already happens, a bit like the reason for increasing the motorway speed for cars!

 

David

David - Milton Keynes

Bailey Alliance 66-2 Motorhome for holidays and a Kia Venga for home.

 

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I would put money on it never happening!

 

Green Lobby and the Safety Lobby will win through. Cannot argue with it using x more fuel or causing x more accidents.

 

Personally I think our motorways are mostly too crowded for it and it is really time they enforced 70. Since getting my van this year I found it really nice sitting at 60 and now drive the car when not towing at a more relaxed pace.

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I'm bored out of my mind driving on motorways, invariably i end up going too fast, just to get the journey over.

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I see the speed limit is to be increased to 80 mph by 2013 . Might not be a welcome increase while towing and a van goes past side swiped by their wind at 80 mph . :wacko:

 

 

 

Dave

 

I thought that the police allowed an extra 10% + 2 mph. If that's the case, than we'll be getting swiped by a 90mph wind.

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Apparently the 80 mph will be strictly enforced? (whilst cutting police numbers) and the deal in the coalition is there will be more suburban 20 mph zones introduced which is fine when schools out but they should be time limited why would you have to drive at 20 mph when there is no one about?

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A already stated, the 80 m. p. h. limit is only a proposal (or more accurately a "Consultation Document") at present, which may lead to the maximum permitted speed being increased. No one is going to be forced to drive at an increased speed if they do not wish to!

 

Regards,

David

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Given the increase in fuel consumption that goes with higher speeds then I expect that could be a major consideration. And given all the government initiatives to reduce CO2 output (not just motoring related) and imporve energy efficiency then I can't see the increase every being sanctioned.

 

I drive a lot of miles for work in a company funded car, and I'm on the HMRC mileage reimbursement scheme (i. e. not company funded fuel). The current figures are based on my car achieving 51. 9 mpg, to be honest this has a huge influence on my driving style because I don't want to be in a position where I am personally subsidising every business mile I travel. With this in mind I'm almost always travelling at less than 70 mph.

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I also believe that speed limiters should be fitted to all commercial vehicles with a kerbweight of > 1500kg.

 

That's a very low weight and includes things like pickups which are commercial vehicles but have a kerbweight higher than that. Why specify commercial vehicles - why not all vehicles being used for work as there's no difference between a pickup being used for work and something like a range rover being used for work after all. Or alternatively, a commercial pickup which is used for work during the week day but just used as their normal car in the evenings and weekends as a couple of our people do. Too hard to make that distinction.

 

As for 80mph definitely increasing accidents, even the terminally dull Brake can only say this morning that increasing the speed limit "could" cause more accidents rather than "would". Also, the 'everybody already drives at 80mph' comment self-defeats the increase in accidents argument - if a lot of people are already doing 80 then there is no increase in overall speed and no increase in accident rates.

 

Some of the other posts above have it nailed - a sensible review of speed limits (more people are killed on smaller B roads than motorways yet lanes are usually 60mph) and strict enforcement of a new upper motorway limit. 80 is fine, 81 get a fine.

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That's a very low weight and includes things like pickups which are commercial vehicles but have a kerbweight higher than that. Why specify commercial vehicles - why not all vehicles being used for work as there's no difference between a pickup being used for work and something like a range rover being used for work after all. Or alternatively, a commercial pickup which is used for work during the week day but just used as their normal car in the evenings and weekends as a couple of our people do. Too hard to make that distinction.

 

As for 80mph definitely increasing accidents, even the terminally dull Brake can only say this morning that increasing the speed limit "could" cause more accidents rather than "would". Also, the 'everybody already drives at 80mph' comment self-defeats the increase in accidents argument - if a lot of people are already doing 80 then there is no increase in overall speed and no increase in accident rates.

 

Some of the other posts above have it nailed - a sensible review of speed limits (more people are killed on smaller B roads than motorways yet lanes are usually 60mph) and strict enforcement of a new upper motorway limit. 80 is fine, 81 get a fine.

 

I did say 'commercial vehicles' and yes it would include small vans and pick up trucks,so what? Carrying passengers who wear seat belts is inherently safer at higher speeds than a jumble of building/plumbing or mechanics tools swaying or moving about in the back of a van/truck being driven at 70mph. How many van or pick up truck drivers consider mass,centres of movement and gravity before driving at high speeds?

I'm not having a go at people who use a small commercial vehicle daily to earn a living but I am criticising drivers who think 70-80mph is a sensible speed in a vehicle that is not designed or built like a car. Come to think about it, why are Ka's and Fiat 500's allowed to drive at more than 60mph on motorways and dual carriageways? They are designed for city driving/urban commuting not whizzing along roads where the margin of safety is more critical.

I will now retire to my man cave and watch and wait for further developments. -_-

 

Regards.

Col

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I think the income for the government from the tax and fuel duty on the extra fuel used on reaching higher speeds will be a big tipping point we would be talking a few billion extra a year . Might be a bit frightening standing on a hard shoulder fixing a puncture with cars racing past at 85 - 90 mph . This could see the introduction of maxmum lane speeds .

 

 

 

Dave

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I did say 'commercial vehicles' and yes it would include small vans and pick up trucks,so what? Carrying passengers who wear seat belts is inherently safer at higher speeds than a jumble of building/plumbing or mechanics tools swaying or moving about in the back of a van/truck being driven at 70mph. How many van or pick up truck drivers consider mass,centres of movement and gravity before driving at high speeds?

 

But a lot of pickups are just as safe as cars, or indeed better than many cars. Our three double-cab pickups have five seats, ABS, traction control, five seat belts, all nicer inside and to drive than my old car. For the majority of the time they have nothing whatsoever in the back - we just have them for towing ability (they each do about 45,000 miles a year with a big 1800kg trailer). So when not towing and being used as a personal vehicle in the evenings and weekends they are no more risk than any other vehicle, indeed are a lot better risk than a lot of older cars on the road. That's the same for a lot of pickups you see - the majority aren't loaded to the gills with building clobber. Focus on poor loading, exceeding speed limits, poorly maintained vehicles - all fine, but just to bracket all 'commercial vehicles' doesn't work. May as well say all cars over 10 years old should be banned as they aren't up to modern vehicle standards therefore are more dangerous.

 

You have a point about smaller cars. With some small sub-100bhp tub puffing along a motorway, getting up to the speeds required to pull out into the centre or outside lanes without causing other cars to have to slow down will be harder if more people are going faster.

 

I think the income for the government from the tax and fuel duty on the extra fuel used on reaching higher speeds will be a big tipping point we would be talking a few billion extra a year . Might be a bit frightening standing on a hard shoulder fixing a puncture with cars racing past at 85 - 90 mph . This could see the introduction of maxmum lane speeds .

 

The proposal this morning was increasing speeds to 80 but with strict enforcement which would be easy and probably a money-raiser. Given a lot of traffic is already doing that speed then it won't make any difference standing on a hard shoulder under current speed limits or the proposed new ones.

 

Did you know that of those people killed on the hard shoulder, which is the most likely place to be killed on a motorway, on average they'd only been there for 26 minutes? Scary place to be already. http://www. hsmc. co. uk/index. php?page=gubbins

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Most of the anti groups are equating a higher speed limit with an increase in vehicle speeds but it doesn't follow that will happen. In my experience raising the speed limit can actually reduce the 85%ile speed.

 

I think all that will happen is that vehicle speeds will generally stay the same but more drivers will now be legal.

 

Furthermore the no one is addressing the question of inappropriate speeds in poor weather conditions, It would make sense to follow the lead of some continental countries and have reduced speed limits when its raining, foggy or snowing.

 

poolebob

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Furthermore the no one is addressing the question of inappropriate speeds in poor weather conditions, It would make sense to follow the lead of some continental countries and have reduced speed limits when its raining, foggy or snowing.

 

Wise words indeed, particularly where we already have variable speed limit areas as the technology is already there to do it.

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I'd have no problem raising the limit to 90mph if we could enforce the 2 second rule.

 

Even when there are marked areas of motorway telling people to drive two chevrons apart, people persist in tailgating. Idiots.

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