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Luggage Restraint In Tow Cars


Steamdrivenandy
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It's puzzled me for a long time that makers of panel vans have to fit a bulkhead between driver and cargo or fit a substantial cage at the back of the driver/passengers seats to protect them from high velocity cargo under abrupt deceleration but Hatchback/MPV/Estate cars don't. OK I understand that it would be impractical to provide such fittings full time but you'd think that it would be an easy accessory to buy and fit.

 

It was for my wife's Yaris Verso where there were 'lugs' either side of the roof which allowed a luggage net to be fitted behind the front seats and there were fittings on the floor to attach the tensioning webbing straps. Brilliant and as we travelled with a dog crate on the folded rear seat and a heavy suitcase on top of the crate we had no fear that the case would slide forward and clout us, or worse.

 

But when I tried to get a similar item for my Kia estate I was told there are none in the country and they'd have to be ordered and cost £400 or so plus they need fitting by a dealer as it's not a DIY job. So needless to say it hasn't happened.

 

At least Kia can get them, most makers don't even offer them.

 

Surely the whole point of a Hatchback/MPV/Estate is that they can be loaded to the roof on occasions and on that basis cargo bay guards for fitting behind the front seat should be freely (and cheaply) available? Why should van drivers be more protected by law than the ordinary car user?

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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The toneau cover cassette on my BMW incorporates a substantial luggage net which can be attached to the roof using the attached bar.

 

The clever bit is that each of the backs of the rear seats has a receiver which take the cassette, so that when the rear seats are folded flat you can locate the toneau cover cassette on the seat back, then you lift the the cargo net into the coresponding receivers in the roof just behind the B pillars. .

 

GPS

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Totally agree as we are constantly told in TV commercials that passenger unbelted can cause the death of a driver by being hit with the force of a small elephant but few cars have luggage points . Even a heavy item in the boot of a saloon can break through the rear seats (being helped the fact most rear seats fold and only rely on a catch) and hit people in the car so its not just estate type cars . More should be done in the car industry to supply proper luggage points and standard fit of a luggage net . Fastening the seat belt when the rear seats are not being used will give more resistance for the heavy items coming through rear seats .

 

 

My car often has when i go away Trolley jack, outboard boat engine and inflatable, awning poles and awning . Small Freezer and Cadac . TV :wacko:

 

 

 

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave
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We have the dog guard anyway which stops stuff coming forward from the boot, although there again there seems to be a tendency by car makers to only cobver the gap between seat back and roof. So what happens to dog/gear in the boot if the rear seat is folded? My main point though about a guard behind the front seats when the back is being used for transporting 'stuff'. Lots of parents have taken students to Uni and back again with the back of the car filled roof high.

 

Interesting point about the Beemer 5 Touring, I'll have to look at that.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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As Grandpa steve says my E61 BMW has a built in load guard in the toneau cover which can be moved to the back of the seat backs when they are laid flat. Also there are load restraining brackets in the boot floor but I think these are fitted to most estates and hatchbacks.

 

Brian

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The toneau cover cassette on my BMW incorporates a substantial luggage net which can be attached to the roof using the attached bar.

 

The clever bit is that each of the backs of the rear seats has a receiver which take the cassette, so that when the rear seats are folded flat you can locate the toneau cover cassette on the seat back, then you lift the the cargo net into the coresponding receivers in the roof just behind the B pillars. .

 

GPS

 

GPS. ... Thats a Dog Guard. I had trouble with mine on our old touring. Asked dealer if it would be a problem not using it. He replied only if you got a dog. ....

Lunar Solaris 1 Limited Edition 2007 Hopefully Behind A

BMW 520D MSport Touring. ...

 

***** Jack of all Trades. ... Master of None *****

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My Citroen C5 estate comes with a heavy-weight woven net which is stored in a locker in the cargo area. It fits between built in rings in the floor and roof lining. I must admit that in 6 years I've never used it but sometimes use the rings with luggage straps.

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

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GPS. ... Thats a Dog Guard. I had trouble with mine on our old touring. Asked dealer if it would be a problem not using it. He replied only if you got a dog. ....

 

 

No, its a luggage restraint net.

 

It can be used with the rear seats in place, or with them dropped, depending upon the volume of gear to be carried.

 

A `dog guard` thats made of fabric? Made by the people who market chocolate fireguards?

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I drive a Mercedes E class estate. It has a built in luggage net that can be attached to the roof whether the rear seats are up or down. I find it a very useful tool when loading the back especially above the seat line. I first came across the net in 124 model estates so I suspect that Mercedes has been doing it for some time. I drive a 2004 E270 estate towing a Vanmaster Applause.

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Looks like a lot of models have some form of protection.

 

I have a similar system to the BMW, could be because it was made by BMW. A net which is rolled up in a carrier, carrier can be fitted behind seats when in use or to the base of the seats when folded forward, double set of points in roof to attach it to.

 

Ian

2018 Range Rover Sport AB,  2015 Buccaneer Cruiser.

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My grand voyager has a load cover that can be moved up so it's behind the front seats, if the rest of the seats are folded away.

I seem to recall there being load straps in the floor too, but i may be wrong about that.

I refer you to the Rt Hon Member for the 19th Century.....................pictured just to the left of your screen..................

 

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Saab also have a number of great optional extras for their estates

  • removable lashing rings that can be positioned as required along the sides of the load area, along with net and ratchet tie downs
  • a net that clips into the roof and attaches to the rings- can be used with rear seats down.
  • a metal dog guard that fits above the rear seat
  • an attachment to the dog guard that splits the load area lengthwise - so you can keep dog,and awning/luggage etc. apart.
  • they even have a sliding boot floor so that you can load heavy items without leaning into the boot!

Alyn

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No, its a luggage restraint net.

 

It can be used with the rear seats in place, or with them dropped, depending upon the volume of gear to be carried.

 

A `dog guard` thats made of fabric? Made by the people who market chocolate fireguards?

Thats what the nice man a the BMW dealership called it. ... Who am I to argue with an outstanding salesman. ...

Lunar Solaris 1 Limited Edition 2007 Hopefully Behind A

BMW 520D MSport Touring. ...

 

***** Jack of all Trades. ... Master of None *****

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Hi,

This is certainly a problem which, in my opinion, is not given enough attention by the safety groups and manufacturers. I can think of at least three occasions where a dog has impacted on the front seat occupants with dire consequences. Personally I think that the various forms of restraint should be provided as standard instead of being an optional extra as on some vehicles.

Regards,

Ian.

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