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Turning Off Gas When Travelling


Craig1803
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I turn off the all the valves to the various appliances, the valve in the front locker & the bottle itself. Don't disconnect.

I refer you to the Rt Hon Member for the 19th Century.....................pictured just to the left of your screen..................

 

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I turn off at the bottle before travelling

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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If propane screw-on connection is used (all time now) turning off at the cylinder is all that is required. However, if the butane snap-on type connector is used these should be dissconected from the cylinder to be sure. I have experianced self-dissconection (faulty cylinder fitting?) & faulty cylinder valves on more than one occasion. On one butane cylinder I had, the regulater could be easily pulled off with min. effort & fell off on its own during transit, on another gas continued to leak out after the regulator had beeen removed!

Yes they were Calor, & bought from a Calor dealer. Hence I now only use the screw-in propane type.

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I leave the cylinders turn on (motorhome) but the present van is designed for this and is fitted with the SecuMotion system. I confess though, I left the cylinders turned on in previous 'vans.

 

Russell

Online blog and travels, although sometimes there is a lack of travel due to work!

 

It's an uncharted sea, it's an unopened door but you've got to reach out and you've got to explore.

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Caravan - Always turned off at the propane cylinder valve(s) and at the appliances when travelling. Cylinder still connected to regulator. Fridge on 12V feed.

 

Motorhome - Fridge left running on gas while travelling (it is designed to be used that way and there is no 12V option), but always shut down fridge and valved off domestic gas cylinder prior to entering a garage forecourt. Everything else valved off when on the road, except the 230 litre LPG tank that is supplying the engine.

 

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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Hi All,

Please don't travel with the gas turned on at the cylinder, in caravans, as should a collision occur then gas can flow from damaged unions/pipework which can then be ignited by various sources. If a fire should occur due to the ignited gas then anybody trapped in a vehicle would be in serious trouble,

Regards,

Ian.

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Hi All,

Please don't travel with the gas turned on at the cylinder, in caravans, as should a collision occur then gas can flow from damaged unions/pipework which can then be ignited by various sources. If a fire should occur due to the ignited gas then anybody trapped in a vehicle would be in serious trouble,

Regards,

Ian.

I agree Ian, and instinctively I would always turn it off at the source, and indeed did with all my caravans, and when using previous UK motorhomes. However the RV that I currently drive has all of the pipework from the installed 20 litre gas cylinder run in well protected copper pipe through the chassis members, and I am assured by the manufacturer that there is an automatic safety cut off system for the fridge should the vehicle be involved in an accident. However as I said above, I do manually make the system totally safe before entering a garage forecourt. The pilot light for the fridge/freezer is fully enclosed and set high (about 5 feet from the ground), and any LPG leakage would naturally tend to be well below the vehicle, but I do understand the risks, and took some pursuading that it was acceptable practice to leave the fridge running in transit

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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I agree Ian, and instinctively I would always turn it off at the source, and indeed did with all my caravans, and when using previous UK motorhomes. However the RV that I currently drive has all of the pipework from the installed 20 litre gas cylinder run in well protected copper pipe through the chassis members, and I am assured by the manufacturer that there is an automatic safety cut off system for the fridge should the vehicle be involved in an accident. However as I said above, I do manually make the system totally safe before entering a garage forecourt. The pilot light for the fridge/freezer is fully enclosed and set high (about 5 feet from the ground), and any LPG leakage would naturally tend to be well below the vehicle, but I do understand the risks, and took some pursuading that it was acceptable practice to leave the fridge running in transit

Gordon.

 

Hi Gordon,

Thankfully I have never attended more than a couple of fires in motorhomes and I think that they were either arson or due to carelesly discarded smoking materials so I know little about the LPG systems used, and can't recall any fires caused by them.

Thanks for the information as I didn't know much of what you have told me though if I have my way we will have a motorhome before long and I will learn about them :D .

I will only offer information/advice, regarding fire/rescue if I have the experience/knowledge of a certain situation and that's why I was careful to mention only caravans when I posted,

Regards,

Ian.

Edited by ian dunning
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Do not disconnect the bottles as keeping the screw in types screwed in keeps the mating surfaces clean.

 

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Good morning Ian,

Thanks for your reply, and I hope you never do have to attend another motorhome fire.

I believe that most European motorhomes are essentially caravans with engines as far as the onbard equipment goes, so the fridge would normally be run on 12V dc while on the road. I think it's only the American RVs that use gas. Having said that, I can remotely start the onboard generator from the driving seat, and the 240V supply will override the fridge gas, and close the inline solenoid gas valve. However a 5KW genny is not the most efficient way to power just a fridge.

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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i turn of the tap above the regulator and close the valve on the bottle.

 

 

I always turn the valve off on the bottle but was told only to turn off the tap above the regulator when changing bottles.

 

Bill

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Belt and braces with me. Tap. off and Bottles turned off.

 

If I need to check for leaks I leave the tap on and bottles shut off and check if the gas indicator drops into red on the Gaslow auto change-over.

 

The pigtails never get removed unless during a bottle change to avoid damage to the propane connection.

Ford C-Max and Coachman Festival 380/2 SE 2006    Motto  Carpe Diem

Still trying to find the perfect pitch. ..110 amp Battery+ 65 watt roof mounted Solar and 25 watt Wind Turbine. LED lighting. Status Aerial 315. Loose chattels marked with UV,. Safefill Gas Fitted.

 

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I turn gas off at bottles when on road and only disconnect at end of season and leave pipe end in a down position to let the oil drain out .

 

 

 

Dave

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I always turn them off and remove the connector when using the blue calor bottles - not used the red type bottles yet but have a connector safely stored away just in case. I can never remember whice one is whice ie. propaine or butaine.

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I can never remember whice one is whice ie. propaine or butaine.
Butane is normally in blue cylinders and is for summer use, although it will often work in spring and autumn.

Propane is normally in in the orange or red cylinders, and is usable all year round, although some use it only in the winter months.

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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