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Torque Settings


fpepper
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Why is so much more paid to torque settings for caravan wheels than for everyday car wheels. ................

 

 

Is that the case ?? I dont really know. Maybe its because more caravan wheels come off than car wheels but again i dont know the stats. I admit i'm old school and dont use a t/wrench on either i do it by feel as do many people with experience on the spanners.

 

peter.

 

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Overtightening can do as much damage as not being tight enough so a torque wrench gives the right amount of leverage . Caravan wheels are not balanced and the vibration adds to the nuts coming loose unlike car wheels .

 

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave
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Agreed - you should use a torque wrench on the car as well. Setting the torques correctly when tightening will also ensure that you can undo them without giving yourself a hernia-we've all heard stories of wheels being fitted with airguns, and proving difficult to remove due to over tightening. ..

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I thought I read somewhere that it is because caravan wheels use bolts and car wheels use studs. .... could be wrong though. .. !

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With a few exceptions Alloy wheels are bolted, steel wheels normally have studs and nuts, car or caravan. This does not cover emergency spares just normal fitments. Various reasons why but it is far harder to have keyed locking wheel nuts as opposed to bolts. Alloys being more expensive were far more prone to being nicked.

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The main difference is that car wheels all tend to be spigot mounted, I still cant understand why caravans aren't spigot mounted as it would save the caravan being held up just by the wheel bolts.

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it would save the caravan being held up just by the wheel bolts.

 

And also much easier to replace a wheel on to the hub.

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

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With a few exceptions Alloy wheels are bolted, steel wheels normally have studs and nuts, car or caravan. This does not cover emergency spares just normal fitments. Various reasons why but it is far harder to have keyed locking wheel nuts as opposed to bolts. Alloys being more expensive were far more prone to being nicked.

Why is it harder? Whether the fastener is a bolt or a nut, the removal key is basically another nut with spline/pins/machining to fit the fastener. I have cars with both systems.

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'Overtightening can do as much damage as not being tight enough' : Commanderdave.

 

 

I used to say, believe, & apply this religiously, but apparently Bailey know better. The new Unicorn bolts are now 160Nm (120Nm for steel) rather than the original 110Nm (take your pick of several, lower, values quoted for steel). Together with the the anti-friction coating this must be producing several times the surface area loading between wheel to bolt head & wheel to drum, & subsequent higher stress on the brake drum threads & more distorting load on the steel wheel.

Not knowing the specific friction rating difference between zinc plated & the new anti-friction coated bolts I can only guestimate. .........& hold my breath in apprehension.

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And also much easier to replace a wheel on to the hub.

The wheel is held in place by the forces between rim and hub and the bolts and rim. About 70% between rim and hub and 30% between bolts and rim.

The spigot does not have any part to play in the tightness of the rim to hub.

I think this has been covered on the Valencia threads when the wheels were causing problems.

Brian

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I thought I read somewhere that it is because caravan wheels use bolts and car wheels use studs. .... could be wrong though. .. !

 

The main difference is that car wheels all tend to be spigot mounted, I still cant understand why caravans aren't spigot mounted as it would save the caravan being held up just by the wheel bolts.

 

What's a 'Spigot' ? Is it the same thing as a 'Stud' ?

Edited by Shirl250
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Around the lage nut in the centre of the hub you will normally find a raised rim above the mounting face of the drum (or disk in the case of a car). This is normally a close fit in the hole in the middle of the wheel and with bolted wheels will centralise the wheel when trying to fit the bolts. It is however the the tapered face of the bolts or nuts that clamp the wheel on to the drum which take the load as these are in full contact as they are torqued up. The only way the boss (or spigot) could be taking a significant load providing the bolts are properly torqued is if it was an interferance fit.

 

Although there are some keyed wheel nuts they are not so common as they are mostly the capped nut type so the stud has to be the correct length to suite the wheel/nut combination. I have seen one incidence of aftermarket wheels being fitted with the wrong nuts which bound down without fully clamping on the wheel. The result was a three-wheeler car with the other one in the ditch. The driver admitted "it did feel a bit funny"

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Thank you very much. Most interesting. There's obviously more to this than meets the eye !! :)

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'Overtightening can do as much damage as not being tight enough' : Commanderdave.

 

 

I used to say, believe, & apply this religiously, but apparently Bailey know better. The new Unicorn bolts are now 160Nm (120Nm for steel) rather than the original 110Nm (take your pick of several, lower, values quoted for steel). Together with the the anti-friction coating this must be producing several times the surface area loading between wheel to bolt head & wheel to drum, & subsequent higher stress on the brake drum threads & more distorting load on the steel wheel.

Not knowing the specific friction rating difference between zinc plated & the new anti-friction coated bolts I can only guestimate. .........& hold my breath in apprehension.

I have said similar before. Apparently it is a temporary "fix" as the cause of the wheel detachments is still not known. ..if it ever is.

 

It also introduces a special situation for just one model of caravan. Just think three or four years down the line!

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