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Caravanning Budget


Ellisfield

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I am going to be terribly un-British and talk about money!

 

The whole caravanning lark seems to be able to be done at within a huge price range and I am interested in how people decide on their spend and I suppose how they justify the spend.

 

I have had a few years of hard times with my work and so money is still tight and so I have come into vanning this year on a very tight budget.

My car I had anyway, which is an old Pug 406 estate that is not worth much, the towbar was from a breakers for £25 including electrics which I fitted myself and our van is a 12 year old Baily Ranger. It is a small one which was bought that size to fit on our drive to do away with storage costs. Most of our kit was left over from our camping days but we are fully set up with the van itself, new tyres on the van and all the kit in place for about £2,500. I am counting on this setup to now not need much to be spent on it and to last at least five years.

 

So I am probably down the very bottom end of the scale.

 

Up at the other end, you can go and buy a nice new van for £13k or much more, I guess plus easily £3k on awning towbar and kit. Plus the towcar of course.

 

OK so most things have a huge price range in them like this but I am interested to hear how people pitch what they spend on caravanning. Will I start to strive for better and newer in time? Do you use your van enough to justify its cost?

Or is it a matter of you having the money so are happy to spend it on something you enjoy.

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I am going to be terribly un-British and talk about money!

 

The whole caravanning lark seems to be able to be done at within a huge price range and I am interested in how people decide on their spend and I suppose how they justify the spend.

 

I have had a few years of hard times with my work and so money is still tight and so I have come into vanning this year on a very tight budget.

My car I had anyway, which is an old Pug 406 estate that is not worth much, the towbar was from a breakers for £25 including electrics which I fitted myself and our van is a 12 year old Baily Ranger. It is a small one which was bought that size to fit on our drive to do away with storage costs. Most of our kit was left over from our camping days but we are fully set up with the van itself, new tyres on the van and all the kit in place for about £2,500. I am counting on this setup to now not need much to be spent on it and to last at least five years.

 

So I am probably down the very bottom end of the scale.

 

Up at the other end, you can go and buy a nice new van for £13k or much more, I guess plus easily £3k on awning towbar and kit. Plus the towcar of course.

 

OK so most things have a huge price range in them like this but I am interested to hear how people pitch what they spend on caravanning. Will I start to strive for better and newer in time? Do you use your van enough to justify its cost?

Or is it a matter of you having the money so are happy to spend it on something you enjoy.

I think that for me your last two sentences hit the mark. I, like you have had cheaper vans and fitted my own towbars etc. This time (6 years ago) it was a case of I had the money and as I go away in the van for more than 10 weeks (often 12) I could justify the expenditure.

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My annual bill for keeping my caravan and the tow car used just to pull it is £5000 a year before i start taking it away with depreciation and insurances and services . Then you have increasing fuel prices and pitch prices . I must be mad or enjoy it !!!! . ..........well i have been doing it over 40yrs .

 

If you start looking at cost caravanning its not for you .

 

 

Dave

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I don't think you need to justify the cost of your caravan to anyone. You buy what you can afford and enjoy it. We all had to start somewhere so if your 'van is dry,reasonably warm and not covered in black streaks and/or algae welcome to caravanning. :lol:

Once your finances improve you can buy a newer model car and caravan. Life is too short to worry about whether or not you 'need' the latest Whizzo Bang Deluxe Twin Axle 6 Berth Air Conditioned Caravan complete with LED Lighting,Full Size Kitchen,King Size Bed,Shower Room and a Full Length Awning in a Choice of Colours.

Don't fret,just enjoy.

 

Regards.

Col

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We had the money to spend, so we spent it. We bought both van & car the same week, one we paid cash for - the van - & the other we got on finance with a decent deposit of px & cash. Storage is the only option for us as our van just doesn't fit on our drive & its quite steep, so thats another £550 a year.

We need a new tow car really, so will get one in the next few months - how long have i been saying that? - but defo before next spring when we'll start towing again. We spend what we can afford at the time. Me & mrs woodie both like new stuff, although having said that our house is 121 years old - well most of it is!!

We need a big car anyway as we often have loads of kids to lug about - there was 9 of us living in our house last christmas!! New tow car will be mid-teens probably, if we can afford that at the time, if not it will be less.

I refer you to the Rt Hon Member for the 19th Century.....................pictured just to the left of your screen..................

 

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same here . we have had years of old vans, damp vans, cramped vans, when we could afford what we wanted we went and got it.

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OK maybe we should live in ignorance of what things cost or maybe we should know in case we value something even better.

 

Enough philosophy.

 

We've had our Eriba for 18 months and it is probably worth just a bit more than we paid for it. That's not bad for a 10 year old van, most 'normal' vans lose between £1,000 and £2,000 a year in depreciation. Admittedly I've had the odd mains socket added as well as Truma Ultraheat and a full-size awning. I've spent about £1,000 on improvements, £200 on repairs and £700 on running costs such as 2 years insurance, recovery and Thetford Green!

 

I reckon that the next 3 years (barring unforeseen probs) should cost about £2,000 a year. That's made up of £170 on improvements, £370 on servicing/repairs, £230 on running costs, £200 lost in interest if I'd had the money invested, around 35 pitch/nights at £800 and £230 on additional fuel whilst tugging the van. As a comparison hiring cottages for 5 weeks would cost somewhere around £3,000 or so.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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Never thought about owning a caravan until last year, spend £1000 in a static for a week. The car we had already had a towbar, KIA Sedona, our budget was about £5000, 5 years holidays I planned while the 3 kids were young and to see if we liked it. We eventually got our swift challenger 2005 for £7500. Best decision we have ever made, I was unfortunate to lose my job just before the big school holidays, but we were able to spend 3 weeks away with my 8 year old twin girls and my 4 year old boy. Since found another job so holidays will be limited to weekends for now.

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We got a brand new caravan in February, we needed the extra room for the kids. So it suited us as I had come into a bit of money after my dad passed away. The new van is nice, but I'd much rather have my Dad back and soldier on with our older more cramped van.

Being a Yorkshireman my Dad always taught me to live within my means, but also enjoy life to the full. I can't take money with me when I go, so I spend it on nice breaks away in the van with the family.

I try not to think about what it costs in too much detail, as I would probably chuck it all in and settle for 2 weeks away on some foreign shore, as it would definitely work out cheaper when you take into account diesel, site fees, storage etc.

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I bought a 1988 Globetrotter in July, used it for 3 long weekends away, and just sold it to someone without even advertising, for a price that has covered the costs of the caravan and a few repairs I did. ... so apart from fees and fuel Its cost me nothing. I then have no winter storage to pay either. ...though Ive just bought a clasic cheltenham, so that will be inside most of winter (Hopefully) so wont be saving fees this time.

 

Last year I had a 1995 Bailey. ..bought for 600. ..spent 300 on it. ...went away a few times and sold it to a dealer for 1600 :)

Before that was a 92 coachman. ..bought for 400, used for 4 days, sold for 800 the next week. lol

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We wanted to get away for more weekends with the dog and we tend to book a cottage for a week sometime during the summer months so the dog can holiday with us, that's why we got into caravanning earlier this year.

 

As for what we spent, we had a suitable towcar (VW Tiguan) so the van, towbar, awnings etc cost us around £15. 5k, we had the cash so we bought what we (Mrs T liked).

 

Started off with a figure of £8k in mind but Mrs T didn't feel comfortable in anything we looked at (seemed cramped and dull inside) so the budget increased to £10k ish and she still didn't feel comfortable in anything we looked at. We were shown an Orion and she fell in love with it, job done. Don't grudge a penny of the spend.

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this is my first post on here, I always thought that a hobby was to be enjoyed? I wanted a campervan, having had three when I was younger. Logistics dictate that I have to keep my car and I could not afford two lots of Insurance, tax, mot and all other doubled up costs. So I went for a van, It's small and light so a 1. 6 petrol focus can pull it. I don't care about 'keeping up with the Joneses' and couldn't give a monkeys if Jeremy Clarkson wants to play conkers with it in five years time. It's MY van. I PAID for it and i'll spend as much or as little as I decide on it.

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Davejulie

 

my sentiments exactly. looked round on the sites we stayed on this year slighty jealous of all the new vans when swmbo said at least ours is bought & paid for.

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As a child we went on the odd holiday here and there in the UK usually in B&B accommodation. My family weren't anti caravan although my Mum likes her luxuries :rolleyes: but money was an issue with my Dad in and out of work.

 

When I was 18 just before my eldest was born my Uncle bought a brand new static in Whitley Bay and providing it wasn't booked out we (me and my ex) were allowed to stay so I did this a few times and instantly wanted one!

 

Me and my now husband looked into it but by the time you got the finance, fees etc and the time limit on your caravan being on site where age was concerned we couldn't afford it at the time.

 

I went my first camping trip with him aged 22 :o and it was absolutely great. Just out walking we went round a few sites where we were and asked about leaving a caravan on site as we don't drive (what I now know as seasonal pitches) and with little or no regulations about how old your van is, as long as it's roadworthy, insured, secured with a wheel clamp / hitch lock and the site have a spare key it seemed alot less hassle so we got caravan hunting when we got home and found a small but exc cond Sprite 400. Tiny but as I say, great! and only £150!

 

When our two son's came along and me having my eldest we upsized a bit, again a few hundred pounds for a clean, dry, towable van.

 

After buying, using, reselling a few caravans we now have a 1989 Abi Ace Ambassador and it's absolutely great and well within our price range. We certainly get and have already had our moneys worth out the caravan and more but I wouldn't swap it unless there was something far wrong and I HAD to. As fot the site fees, depending on the site between £750 - £1100 we've paid which includes winter storage. To get our money's worth this way we're up as many weekends as we can, normally every weekend except the odd time one of us HAS to work or has something on so again we get our money's worth.

 

I couldn't afford brand new right now but could afford to upgrade but the truth is I don't want to, I prefer to pay out what I can knowing the caravan's mine and not the finance companys until I finish paying but again that's just my choice.

 

So yes you could say we get our money's worth as apart from site fees and the kid's bus or train fares, (I get a travel pass due to health so my Husband can travel too) there's no real outlay, just food, days out etc and I like the knowing we can go up last minute if there's a sudden change of plan without having to book - or if it's a "skint" week as I say :D

Compass Shadow 1988

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Davejulie

 

my sentiments exactly. looked round on the sites we stayed on this year slighty jealous of all the new vans when swmbo said at least ours is bought & paid for.

 

Don't assume new vans aren't bought and paid for B)

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Guest Benzowner

It is alot to do with when you start vanning and the reasons for doing so. When our kids were young, we always rented a cottage in Cornwall and really didn't think we could afford a caravan. I was fortunate enough to get a job with a company car, so the expense of starting vanning was significantly less. We bought our first van, a 1985 Adria 430C7 which was brand new but had been at the dealers for a year, can't remember the exact price but it was not much more than £3000. 00, a lot I know, but we could then look at weekends away as well as our usual 2 weeks, which by then was costing nearly £1000 per year. Kept that van for about 5 years and "upgraded" to a newer van and traded in and got nearly what I paid for it. Did the same over the next decade or so until we ended up with our new Bailey Pageant Vendee and Mercedes E Class. If both were new, combined price would be about £60K, needless to say the Merc was not new :D, but that is how I think most new outfits are bought. It would, I think be prohibitive to buy a new van and car, when the cost of the van could be over 25K and a car to tow it around 40K

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I agree with you 'Whatever'. If you see someone with a new car and van don't assume that they are both 'on tick'. We never buy anything on credit and only buy things if we have the money. We saved really hard for our Bailey Olympus and new mondeo and are proud to say they are ours. The main thing is that it does not matter whether you have new or old, or how much money you spend - you just need to enjoy it. If we make some happy memories for our families in our vans then I don't think it matters how much/how little is spent?

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The great thing about caravnning is that it fits with all kinds of different budgets. Does not matter what your outfit is as long as you enjoy it.

 

My wife and myself are both 27. Both of us grew up caravanning with parents, and that is how we met, on a hoiday rally in Holland, and why I ended up moving from the Midlands to Blackpool! We started camping with a little tent, the relationship got more serious, we bought a house together and continued camping for another couple of years. Then just under three years ago we got fed up with lack of space, camping in the rain, and the fact I had recently changed my car to something that could tow, and remembering the luxieries of caravanning went and bout a 7 year old Swift for £4000, which was all we could afford at the time. We've had a great three years with it and our finances have now chnaged for the better, and now feeling that the two birth Swift is getting too small for us we have just part exd it for a 2007 Sterling which we get this weekend.

 

This all boils down to that fact we bought what we wanted and more importantly what we could afford at the time. We use the caravan at least once every month and very often more, we also use it for all the bank holidays and longer holidays so feel we can justify the expense becuause of what we get from it.

 

Sam

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Bought our first van new, about 26 years ago as my wife is allergic to dog and cat hair so didn't want to run the risk of buying one that had a dog in it. Traded it in 4years later to the same dealer for what we paid. Never been that lucky again. Spend what you can afford and are comfortable with whether that is cash or finance and enjoy your purchase. In this economic climate sometimes finance can be better than paying cash. Start worrying about what its costing in depreciation etc and you may be better staying at home with your money under the bed.

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People live to their means,

 

If your budget for a van is £1000 you look at vans for £1000 and can only dream of vans that cost £2000

 

If your budget is van is £10,000 you look at vans for £10,000 00 and can only dream of vans that cost £20,000

 

If your budget for a house is £1,000,000 you look at houses for £1,000,000 of can only dream of houses that cost £2,000,000

 

In my youth I used to go away on holiday and stand on the end of the motoway thumbing a lift as I had £20 to last me the week.

 

In my mid term of life, I am lucky, I can afford to go where and when I please without worrying about cost. But that does not mean it i enjoy it more, or less. When I was skint I had some of the best times of my life. Now the best times are with my family. I live to my budget. If I lost it all next week I would still have my family to enjoy life with.

 

Ask yourself. Would you rather be in a £50k motorhome on your own. Or in a £1k van with the ones you love?

 

I know I would rather be with the ones I love.

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hello all, i sold my self build camper for £2000, brought a car for the same amount, sold the combi camp trailer tent for £750, brought a folding casita caravan for the same amount, never had so much fun, people looked amazed when we turn up on site, and un-fold the "flat pack", lite and easy to tow, and it fits in the front garden without blocking the sun coming in the window, hope this helps

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Be careful you don't fall into the trap. You might know the price of caravaning but not the value. It does not matter how much you paid for you kit its about how much you and your's get out of it.

 

kot

pigs

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Be careful you don't fall into the trap. You might know the price of caravaning but not the value. It does not matter how much you paid for you kit its about how much you and your's get out of it.

 

kot

pigs

 

I guess that's another version of the saying 'Knowing the price of everything but the value of nothing'.

 

But there can be an element of self-delusion where we believe what the marketing men insinuate in our brains and forget to think for ourselves and that can seriously damage your wealth, such as it is.

 

As an example buying a shiny new £20,000 van may satisfy the aesthete and may polish the ego but you're probably waving goodbye to £2,000 or so depreciation in a year and around another thousand in lost interest.

 

You'll probably buy a gurt great 4x4 to tug the van when with no van you'd be perfectly happy in a 'normal' car and so you're paying a penalty in VED, insurance, fuel and extra depreciation that's inching close to another £3,000 or more. That's without all the nick nacks you might buy for the van, servicing, insurance, recovery, repairs, pitch fees add £500 to £1,000 more a year and of course storage charges.

 

On the basis of the above the shiny new caravan will cost your pocket towards the nasty end of £10,000 a year in visible and not so visible costs. That's an awful lot of wonga to sit in a simmering traffic jam on the M6.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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My caravanning days started after years of getting cold in a tent huddled round a Baby R. Our first tent we could only sleep in it with a hanging light to see at night. we ate outside and if it was wet we hung a piece of canvas between the tent and the windbreak to get a bit of shelter. If it was wet and windy. . tuff.

 

Our first van (in 2004) was a 1990 Trophy Olympic Silver towed by a 98 mondeo td total was £2000 we had it three years, the Mondeo was hit twice in our time and the combined insurances covered the total cost.

 

We then made the fatal mistake of visiting a dealers to get a new rooflight for the Trophy and signed on the dotted for a 2001 Bailey Pageant Auvergne £7700 in 2007 and had to upgrade the car as well to a 2003 Vectra DTI SRi Fine van rotten car, but boy did we used that caravan, even lived in it for 3 months after a house purchase fell through, then another 4 months later on. I knew that van inside out. so in a way the van paid for itself as we didnt have to rent a place. By 2010 we were halfway through the finance and as I had set up a mobile caravan servicing business (in 2008) we decided to part with the van and just use whatever caravan was going cheap at the time. The vectra had long gone and we had an even worse 05 Renault Grand Scenic, a car reliable in the fact you knew it would reliably break down and it was during one such reliably unreliable moment when the car had to be abandoned on the road outside the house a lovely woman drove headfirst into it. If ever a prayer was answered, it was that the thing would be written off, and joy of joys it was.

 

So here we are in 2011 determined not to have finance on anything, we had a budget of 6k for both car and caravan, and i spent the lot on a 55 Honda Accord tourer ex diesel. Mrs Boss was not impressed. So we emptied the piggy bank and bought a slightly soiled 2003 Elddis 5 berth for £2800, fine van, that`ll do nicely methinks, same layout as the Auvergne just a bit shorter. We used it twice. It had to go. She was adament. How things have moved on from the tent days eh!

 

In June i took a call from a couple who had bought a van to live in while their house was being built and now wanted rid of it. It was a 2006 Bailey Vendee S5 and a bit grubby to say the least, I could never afford it anyway, he`d paid 8. 5k in Dec 2010. They both declared their hate for it and would never own another caravan and would i give them £3650 for it as that was what they were due the builder. How could we turn that down? We took a gamble that the Elddis would sell and raided every account and got there. The Boss was delighted with the layout, me not quite so with the condition. The buttocks were clenched when i was putting a "for sale" sign in the Elddis, the taxi driver who drops some kids off outside our house after school knocked the window and after a bit of discussion bought it for £4200, How lucky was that?

Apart from the Auvergne with lost us 5k but by far the best caravan owned by us,we have been very fortunate that were able to save to buy the Elddis, and i suppose fortunate that my line of business does throw up bargains like the Vendee occasionally. I have still not been forgiven for buying the Honda, something to do with carpets and curtains. We do rallies and attend classic car shows so gas bill is a bit higher and we tend to use cc sites for our longer break, and for our weekend breaks we travel no further than about 50 miles and are constantly surprised at whats available on our doorstep. We got all the things like the aquaroll thrown in with the Auvergne and just kept them. Our budget for a weekend break is £150 and most times we dont spend it all and will treat ourselves to a high tea on the way home.

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