Jump to content

Warranties


BFM

Recommended Posts

I have read a lot of reports on these forums about dealers or manufacturers refusing to undertake repairs 'because the warranty has run out'. A manufacturer's warranty is normally for a year, and unless there is accidental or intentional damage there is an obligation on them to restore what has happened in that time. However, that is not the end of the matter. There is also the Sale of Goods Act to consider.

 

This flowchart:

http://www. oft. gov. uk/shared_oft/738369/738378/forcustomersflowchart_pdf. pdf

explains our rights under the SOGA in simple terms.

 

There is more information here:

 

http://www. direct. gov. uk/en/Governmentcitizensandrights/Consumerrights/index. htm

 

As an example, a post here recently said that a locker door was found to be mouldy more than a year after purchase. The manufacturer (or dealer) refused repair as it was out of warranty. However, one needs to ask if it is reasonable for a caravan seal to fail, and how long it would be reasonable for it to last. I think that a 5 or 6 year life for a seal (when looked at in the round across industry) is quite reasonable, and if a seal fails before that it is a workmanship and or design issue and that the consumer should look to the manufacturer or dealer to contribute at the very least to the costs of repair and reinstatement. Few dealers want consumers to know about the SOGA, and even more make a small contribution 'as a gesture of goodwill' making the unsuspecting consumer feel good about the 'care' they have received when the dealer or manufacturer should probably pay the whole cost.

 

This can be a complex area, and I urge anyone looking at use of the SOGA to take professional advice. However, it is important protection for the consumer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

as an ex-used carcar salesperson, i can honestly say that warrenties are NOT worth the paper they are written on, any thing that can go wrong or will go wrong will not and is not covered (in most case's) on used vehicles beit a car or caravan, buyer beware should be the rule of thumb when buying ' used ' cars or 'vans

the greatest benefit for the greatest number

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have read a lot of reports on these forums about dealers or manufacturers refusing to undertake repairs 'because the warranty has run out'. A manufacturer's warranty is normally for a year, and unless there is accidental or intentional damage there is an obligation on them to restore what has happened in that time. However, that is not the end of the matter. There is also the Sale of Goods Act to consider.

 

This flowchart:

http://www. oft. gov. u. ..owchart_pdf. pdf

explains our rights under the SOGA in simple terms.

 

There is more information here:

 

http://www. direct. go. ..ights/index. htm

 

As an example, a post here recently said that a locker door was found to be mouldy more than a year after purchase. The manufacturer (or dealer) refused repair as it was out of warranty. However, one needs to ask if it is reasonable for a caravan seal to fail, and how long it would be reasonable for it to last. I think that a 5 or 6 year life for a seal (when looked at in the round across industry) is quite reasonable, and if a seal fails before that it is a workmanship and or design issue and that the consumer should look to the manufacturer or dealer to contribute at the very least to the costs of repair and reinstatement. Few dealers want consumers to know about the SOGA, and even more make a small contribution 'as a gesture of goodwill' making the unsuspecting consumer feel good about the 'care' they have received when the dealer or manufacturer should probably pay the whole cost.

 

This can be a complex area, and I urge anyone looking at use of the SOGA to take professional advice. However, it is important protection for the consumer.

Exactly its a great piece of legislation which I have used in relation to a 4 yr old fridge freezer, there are some slight differences between Scotland and England but for the sake of £50 at the small claims court its worth it, it also relates to second hand goods, the action is against the firm who sells the goods not the manufacturer.

This is a great site.

 

http://www. consumeractiongroup. co. uk/forum/forumdisplay. php?56-General-Consumer-Issues

Link to comment
Share on other sites

as an ex-used carcar salesperson, i can honestly say that warrenties are NOT worth the paper they are written on, any thing that can go wrong or will go wrong will not and is not covered (in most case's) on used vehicles beit a car or caravan, buyer beware should be the rule of thumb when buying ' used ' cars or 'vans

 

 

A friend is the manager of an electrical retail shop. One of the ones that is on every retail park in the country.

If a customer comes in complaining about an item they bought they always say the manufactures warranty is XXX months. Most customers accept this.

 

If a customer complains too much, depending on the cost of the item and how old when it developed a fault 99. 9% of the time they back down if the customer has done their research and understands the EU law.

 

Why, Because thet know the EU has stringent laws and they last a lot longer then the manufacturers standard guarantee, and if it went to court the EU guarantee would always come above the manufactures guarantee.

 

If I have just paid nearly 20K for a new van I expext it to last a reasonable amount of time because of the price I paid. If a window seal went after 18 months I would expect it to be repaired by the dealer who I bought it from. I dont give two hoots what the manufacturer says. My contract is with my supplier, and my suppliers contract is with the manufacturer.

 

A manufacturesrs guarantee can offer a better guarantee than the EU law states. But not a lower guarantee than you are already offerd by the EU guarantee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

A friend is the manager of an electrical retail shop. One of the ones that is on every retail park in the country.

If a customer comes in complaining about an item they bought they always say the manufactures warranty is XXX months. Most customers accept this.

 

If a customer complains too much, depending on the cost of the item and how old when it developed a fault 99. 9% of the time they back down if the customer has done their research and understands the EU law.

 

Why, Because thet know the EU has stringent laws and they last a lot longer then the manufacturers standard guarantee, and if it went to court the EU guarantee would always come above the manufactures guarantee.

 

If I have just paid nearly 20K for a new van I expext it to last a reasonable amount of time because of the price I paid. If a window seal went after 18 months I would expect it to be repaired by the dealer who I bought it from. I dont give two hoots what the manufacturer says. My contract is with my supplier, and my suppliers contract is with the manufacturer.

 

A manufacturesrs guarantee can offer a better guarantee than the EU law states. But not a lower guarantee than you are already offerd by the EU guarantee.

I'm with you all the way. I have had an instance with a laptop and caravan where the supplier said it was out of manufacturer's warranty. In both cases I said 'not my problem'. In both cases result.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I moved house two years ago and had to buy new cooker, fridge and tumble dryer. I am now getting the standard letters from the manufacturers stating that my "older" appliances are now likely to break down and I should take out extended warranties. I simply return these letters with a note saying that as they do not expect their equipment to last more than two years I do not consider it to be of merchantable quality or comply with EU regulations and will not buy from them again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sweet dreams peep's, the C. C's are full of folk trying to get these and similar case's through the legal mine field, is it really worth the bother ? nothing last's forever, things wear out, general wear and tear takes it's toll on everything, whats reasonable to person A may not be to person B,

reading these post's simply re-inforces, for me, that the ' claim for everything mentality ' is alive and well.

 

my car was bought new in 2003, now i would 'reasonably' expect it to last 20 yrs but hey ho things are starting to go wrong, it's well out of warrenty now, so should i go to court because it is costing me money to keep it on the road ?,

 

don't think i'd get very far do you?, all the world and his wife seems to want something for nothing these days,,really p*sse's me off

the greatest benefit for the greatest number

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sweet dreams peep's, the C. C's are full of folk trying to get these and similar case's through the legal mine field, is it really worth the bother ? nothing last's forever, things wear out, general wear and tear takes it's toll on everything, whats reasonable to person A may not be to person B,

reading these post's simply re-inforces, for me, that the ' claim for everything mentality ' is alive and well.

 

my car was bought new in 2003, now i would 'reasonably' expect it to last 20 yrs but hey ho things are starting to go wrong, it's well out of warrenty now, so should i go to court because it is costing me money to keep it on the road ?,

 

don't think i'd get very far do you?, all the world and his wife seems to want something for nothing these days,,really p*sse's me off

 

Of course reasonable wear and tear should be taken into account, and with something like a car there are bound to be things like clutch, brakes, tyres, that have a known limited llfe, but that life must be reasonable given the purpose of the object. . But if your 7 year old car was proclaimed irreparable and worthless would you be content? or if your clutch failed after two years? The OP was relating to a door seal. I would have thought with a caravan that the door seal was a vital part and should last for several years, not just the one year's warranty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Of course reasonable wear and tear should be taken into account, and with something like a car there are bound to be things like clutch, brakes, tyres, that have a known limited llfe, but that life must be reasonable given the purpose of the object. . But if your 7 year old car was proclaimed irreparable and worthless would you be content? or if your clutch failed after two years? The OP was relating to a door seal. I would have thought with a caravan that the door seal was a vital part and should last for several years, not just the one year's warranty.

 

point taken but by the same token, it's longevity would also be dependent upon how much uasge same seal had had to endure within the specified time period or are we to expect the dealer/ manufacturer to repair item's irrespective of how much abuse / use the said item has or has not taken, as i said NOTHING lasts for ever,

 

personally for a 2 bob bit of rubber seal i'd have sorted it myself, i wouldn't even have thought about arguing the toss over it, now if a window had fell out or the door had fallen off, then thats a different matter

the greatest benefit for the greatest number

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem with caravan warranties is that all the manufacturers make a big deal about their vans come with a 5, 6 or 10 year warranty. The trouble is that it is not clear what exactly is covered and in fact the majority of the equipment in the van has only a one year warranty. From what I can see the only part that is covered by the 5+ year warranty is the actual body, anything else in the van or fitted to the van is only covered for one year as they have been manufactured by somebody else. Car manufacturers do not do this when you buy a car, they again only make certain parts mainly the body, engine and gearbox all the fittings and fixtures are again manufactured by somebody else. The whole vehicle is covered by the warranty with the proviso of reasonable wear and tear, you can imagine the out cry if you took your 2 year old car back to the garage for a warranty claim and they said its not covered because the car manufacturer didn't make that particular part.

 

I wonder has anybody ever brought this matter to the Advertising Standards Authority?

 

It is about time that the caravan manufacturers moved into the 21st century and offered a warranty that covered the whole van for say 3 years with a water ingress extension to 5 or more years.

 

ElBeardo :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem with caravan warranties is that all the manufacturers make a big deal about their vans come with a 5, 6 or 10 year warranty. The trouble is that it is not clear what exactly is covered and in fact the majority of the equipment in the van has only a one year warranty. From what I can see the only part that is covered by the 5+ year warranty is the actual body, anything else in the van or fitted to the van is only covered for one year as they have been manufactured by somebody else. Car manufacturers do not do this when you buy a car, they again only make certain parts mainly the body, engine and gearbox all the fittings and fixtures are again manufactured by somebody else. The whole vehicle is covered by the warranty with the proviso of reasonable wear and tear, you can imagine the out cry if you took your 2 year old car back to the garage for a warranty claim and they said its not covered because the car manufacturer didn't make that particular part.

 

I wonder has anybody ever brought this matter to the Advertising Standards Authority?

 

It is about time that the caravan manufacturers moved into the 21st century and offered a warranty that covered the whole van for say 3 years with a water ingress extension to 5 or more years.

 

ElBeardo :)

 

I dont know any new car i have bought that has a full warranty . Usually Batteries are never covered for more than one year . Even a KIA 7yr warranty has conditions (the radio only has one yr Panasonic warranty ).

 

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just had a call from dealer to say service done. ..they are charging me £12 labour for a catch which was faulty on one locker box but submitting a warranty claim to Swift for the water ingress on the other locker box. ...I would have thought both issues are covered by warranty. ...I shall obviously have to discuss this with them tomorrow but I expect I'll have to pay :angry:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sweet dreams peep's, the C. C's are full of folk trying to get these and similar case's through the legal mine field, is it really worth the bother ? nothing last's forever, things wear out, general wear and tear takes it's toll on everything, whats reasonable to person A may not be to person B,

reading these post's simply re-inforces, for me, that the ' claim for everything mentality ' is alive and well.

 

my car was bought new in 2003, now i would 'reasonably' expect it to last 20 yrs but hey ho things are starting to go wrong, it's well out of warrenty now, so should i go to court because it is costing me money to keep it on the road ?,

 

don't think i'd get very far do you?, all the world and his wife seems to want something for nothing these days,,really p*sse's me off

Hi Oldowl,

Is it not the right of the consumer to expect goods to last a reasonable amount of time, as specified under consumer Law? How is that 'something for nothing'?

I think that the point of the topic is to inform people of the legislation and the fact that the manufacturer's warrenty period is so much hot air and that we have further rights. What really annoys me is retailers who hide behind such warrenties when they know full well of this legislation. It is nothing more nothing less than out and out dishonesty.

My Mother's TV lasted 23 months before giving up the ghost with the result that it was not worth repairing. She was treated with contempt by the store so I took up the battle and walked out of the store with a new replacement because I know the rules. If that males me part of the 'something for nothing' culture then I am proud to be so.

I agree that there are people who will try to take advantage but that doesn't mean that genuine people should be criticised for exercising their rights surely?

Regards,

Ian.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...