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All Things Awning.


Thingy
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Having just bought a new awning, I had a look at the companies website where they have quite a few instructional videos. Having watched a few of them, it got me thinking about a few things.

 

I have always put the roof canopy up first and then attached the panels, but Isabella recommend putting up with all the panels in place. How do you do yours. Same with packing away? Is it me, or do awnings expand after the first use, they never ever seem to fit back in the bag they came in. They also suggest tensioning the poles with the panels partly open, I have always tensioned poles with all panels fully zipped, nothing worse than getting it looking tickety boo and finding you can fasten the door. Again, when packing away, we have always taken the panels off and folded them seperately as we feel we can do it with less stress and creasing to the windows, but I am getting the feeling Im the odd one out here.

 

http://www. isabella. net/uk/support/assembly/2009-/isabella-support-assembly-assemblyvb. html iks the video I have been watching. Question is, do you think that laying ground cover, then a ground sheet, then a Bolon carpet on somebodies grass is a bit naughty. I would never do that.

 

Also, a quote from the Isabella website is:

 

Use:

Unroll the GroundCover along the caravan where the awning is to be erected. The underlay must exceed the awning by 30-50 cm on all sides. Use a pair of scissors to cut the strip in the correct length. Unroll the second strip next to the first strip. Cut to the same length. Place and overlap the strips. About 30-50 cm underlay should be visible on all sides of the awning. Peg the corners of the underlay. The underlay is durable so it is possible to puncture the product with the peg. This will not impair the function of the underlay.

 

 

Would you really erect your awning with up to 50cm of that stuff sticking out all the way round.

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Having just bought a new awning, I had a look at the companies website where they have quite a few instructional videos. Having watched a few of them, it got me thinking about a few things.

 

I have always put the roof canopy up first and then attached the panels, but Isabella recommend putting up with all the panels in place. How do you do yours. Same with packing away? Is it me, or do awnings expand after the first use, they never ever seem to fit back in the bag they came in. They also suggest tensioning the poles with the panels partly open, I have always tensioned poles with all panels fully zipped, nothing worse than getting it looking tickety boo and finding you can fasten the door. Again, when packing away, we have always taken the panels off and folded them seperately as we feel we can do it with less stress and creasing to the windows, but I am getting the feeling Im the odd one out here.

 

http://www. isabella. ...assemblyvb. html iks the video I have been watching. Question is, do you think that laying ground cover, then a ground sheet, then a Bolon carpet on somebodies grass is a bit naughty. I would never do that.

 

Also, a quote from the Isabella website is:

 

 

 

 

Would you really erect your awning with up to 50cm of that stuff sticking out all the way round.

 

always erect awning without panels,panels put in after main part of awning is erected(but not pegged down or tensioned).always tension when panels are in place. to tension with panels slightly open will almost certainly have to much tension on the zip that is used for the door entrance. i always make sure the door entrance zip is loose enough while tensioning the frame.

no. ...we never leave the groundsheet showing,and quite honestly have never seen this???

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Don't have a full awning at the moment but have had one up until a year or so ago.

 

Always removed all the panels before folding away, it was easier to roll the roof section up small and then fold/roll the window panels to minimise creasing. Awning roof was fed into the awning rail without panels and framework roughly positioned but not tensioned. Panels then zipped in all the way (with no openings) and the framework was all tensioned. Once all pegged out and the draught skirt in place on the van only then would I put down the groundsheet and tuck it over the mud flaps of the awning on the inside so no groundsheet is visible from the outside! Never seen this either. .....

 

Did tension the awning and peg it out once while one of the door sections was slightly open and it was almost impossible to close without over straining the zips!

 

Am very surprised by this information from Isabella.

 

Ian

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to tension with panels slightly open will almost certainly have to much tension on the zip that is used for the door entrance.

 

and

 

Did tension the awning and peg it out once while one of the door sections was slightly open and it was almost impossible to close without over straining the zips!

 

 

Exactly what I thought. I personally cant see any logic in this at all.

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Nor can I see any logic in having groundsheet showing cos when lie of land is wrong you would get rain inside the awning. That's provided is raining when the lie of the land is wrong. :rolleyes:

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We have and Isabella Magnum Porch which is quite managable putting up/taking down with panels in place.

 

If we had a full awning though, would imagine that the panels would have to come out then.

 Stay safe ~ Griff    :ph34r:

Wheels at the front ~ Green Oval Towing Machine

Wheels at the back ~ 4 of ‘em

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just aquired out 1st full awning, up until now we've managed with a porch awning, so am very interested in this thread, never having put a full size one up before but as a rank novice it was my intention to erect it, minus the panels, then put panels in place and tension as required,with panels zipped up, also would have thought it made more sense to keep all the ground sheet inside the awning to avoid any water ingress from rainwater run off

the greatest benefit for the greatest number

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also would have thought it made more sense to keep all the ground sheet inside the awning to avoid any water ingress from rainwater run off

 

Absolutely, but the other thing suggested on the website is that they are actually using three layers of ground cover, surely even breathable groundsheets would be ineffective at that.

 

 

Just looking at the "NEW" groundcover on Robinsons website, the smallest amount they sell is 2m x 18m and the cost, £91. 18, which is 30% more than I paid for the carpet its supposed to keep clean.

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Wow, what can I say. I thought I would ask Isabella about the instructions of slackening the panels prior to tensioning, and sent them an email at 0938 this morning. At 0945 I had a call from them and had a conversation with one of their guys about the subject. Apparently, quite a few people have questioned this, but the upshot is, they stand by what they say, unzip the top of the four panels slightly, and you can get an extra inch of tension on the poles, and he guarrantees the zips wont be either overtight and difficult to close. Ill try this next week, though I still say it goes against everything I was taught.

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We always put up the roof section without panels first to keep the weight under control. I was shown a way years ago by staff from Isabella's exhibition team from the factory, and it is best described as follows.

 

1. lay out ground sheet.

2. Thread roof section through van and attach pole pads. ( and yes with each new awning they did unzip the panels first)

3. Assemble top frame, starting with the middle rafter and leg ( not including the canopy poles yet) and then tension the legs hard against the white tapes (using middle hole unless the ground is well out). Tension each leg as soon as it's connected to the rafter.

4. The whole roof is now self supporting. If windy nail it down with temporary pegs.

6 Zip in all the panels.

7 in turn unzip the top of the panels leaving the base zips fully shut and tension roof (when you see how much tension they put on it you ain't going to tear anything.) then assemble canopy poles.

8 nail down the corners against the van and then pull legs and sides and front into position and nail it down properly.

 

Dismantle as above in reverse. These people put them up for a living and I've never found a quicker easier way. As regards the ground sheet we only use the bolon but remember a lot of people on the continent use Isabella awning for months on end including during winters with lots of snow. We have spoken to people in Spain that have had them up for years. If I was using ours high in the alps then their ground sheet system makes sense.

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I follow all this Alan, pretty much what the Isabella guy said today, and now he has explained it, Im going to give that a go. What threw me, and I guess a few others is that we have always done it t'other way about, and tensioned with everything closed up.

 

I take your point too about differing conditions for the ground sheet system. Like most here, I tend to translate what I see into what is required for us in this country, and of course the reaction of campsite owners to dead grass.

 

I tend to forget that Johnny Foreigner caravans too.

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We wouldn't normally use a groundsheet at all, but on the rare occasions we have, we use a breathable (rubber coated string weave) one, that has not been cut, but is folded where necessary to keep it about 150mm inside the mudwall all the way around. I would never have a plastic sheet sticking out around the awning for the reasons already highlighted, unwanted water ingress and damage to the pitch (if on grass).

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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We wouldn't normally use a groundsheet at all,

 

 

We don't use one either. But we do carry a light cheap polypropylene tarpaulin (the blue kind builders use) to put on the ground temporarily before unrolling the roof section and threading it through the awning rail. It keeps the awning clean. We put it on the ground again to roll up the awning on it when packing it away.

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