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Adding A 12v Aux Socket


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At my TV point I have the Coaxial / 12v 2 pin socket. I want to add another 12v cigar socket in a cupboard above, this is near the radio, so I can run my ipod charger whilst its plugged into the aux radio socket.

The cable will run in the main wiring trunking in the wardrobe and will be totally covered and protected.

 

My wiring diagram shows the 12v socket is fed with 4mm cable and run off a 10A fuse, I intend to piggy back off the 2 wires of this socket with 4mm cable to the new socket.

Does this sound OK ??? same size cable running off the 10A fuse.

Is 4mm cable the right size for a 10A fuse ???

 

I have already run a new hook-up aerial to the status booster from the outside locker, whilst doing this I had all the trunking and covers off in the wardrobe. There is alot of wires LOL.

Edited by rubberscrubber
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Can you come and do mine? Sounds good to me. :)

Ford C-Max and Coachman Festival 380/2 SE 2006    Motto  Carpe Diem

Still trying to find the perfect pitch. ..110 amp Battery+ 65 watt roof mounted Solar and 25 watt Wind Turbine. LED lighting. Status Aerial 315. Loose chattels marked with UV,. Safefill Gas Fitted.

 

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That sounds fine.

 

According to an electrical website 4mm cable is rated at 25A

 

Regards,

Steve

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I have just done the same but to add a 12v point outside the van in the awning. Technically the cigarette lighter type socket is rated at 16A so if you intend to use both sockets you could up the rating of the fuse to 15A if its a blade type.

 

I was quite lucky as I found in the space where the electrics are an unused cable for an unfitted option. It was long enough to reach the point I wanted to and is auxilliary switched and was heavy enough for this pupose.

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Yes, it will be fine.

 

Obviously, you can only draw 10A total if you have items plugged into both, but this sounds unlikely if you are only charging your iPod.

 

 

At my TV point I have the Coaxial / 12v 2 pin socket. I want to add another 12v cigar socket in a cupboard above, this is near the radio, so I can run my ipod charger whilst its plugged into the aux radio socket.

The cable will run in the main wiring trunking in the wardrobe and will be totally covered and protected.

 

My wiring diagram shows the 12v socket is fed with 4mm cable and run off a 10A fuse, I intend to piggy back off the 2 wires of this socket with 4mm cable to the new socket.

Does this sound OK ??? same size cable running off the 10A fuse.

Is 4mm cable the right size for a 10A fuse ???

 

I have already run a new hook-up aerial to the status booster from the outside locker, whilst doing this I had all the trunking and covers off in the wardrobe. There is alot of wires LOL.

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Technically the cigarette lighter type socket is rated at 16A.

 

HairyFool most cigarette lighter are rated at 10A esp those in standard cars etc. there are some higher rated plugs and sockets (up to 20A) but these are special order and you would need matching plugs and sockets.

 

The normal higher rated socket is the DIN std which is normaly rated at between 16 and 20A depending upon the manufacture and has a positive locking device.

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For charging phones / iPods, you will have no problem. What should be borne in mind is what happens if you sell the van? A future owner would not be aware of the two sockets sharing the same supply cable, and could potentially overload. Unless you plan to remove the new socket, better to run a new cable from the 12 v supply

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This is a valid point.

 

I have the same problem when rewiring anything like a boat or caravan.

 

As caravans tend to be more production items, people tend to fiddle less with the electrics.

 

Its very common on boats, especially as many boaters like to fit out their own boats and add navigational aids to their boat.

 

Its quite common to find botched electrics on secondhand boats from the previous owner (never buy a boat from a DIY enthusiast).

 

If I change or add anything, I usually produce a wiring diagram to detail what I've done and hope this gets passed to the new owner.

 

With a caravan, if you have the handbook, you can modify the wiring diagram by hand or add an extra page notifying the future owner what you have done.

 

In this example, if they overload, they will just blow the 10A fuse.

 

For charging phones / iPods, you will have no problem. What should be borne in mind is what happens if you sell the van? A future owner would not be aware of the two sockets sharing the same supply cable, and could potentially overload. Unless you plan to remove the new socket, better to run a new cable from the 12 v supply

Edited by Barry J
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For charging phones / iPods, you will have no problem. What should be borne in mind is what happens if you sell the van? A future owner would not be aware of the two sockets sharing the same supply cable, and could potentially overload. Unless you plan to remove the new socket, better to run a new cable from the 12 v supply

 

A quick tip:

Detail any changes with a drawing and/or text and/or photographs and put a copy in the caravan handbook.

 

Then in the future, if you sell the caravan, the new owner has all the information. .... and of course, as age has a tendency to dull the memory, if you need to make any further changes or modifications you can always refer back to it.

 

As a side note. .....I did this with some changes I made when I added additional lights to my old Discovery. ... added wiring diagrams, photos and text on how the new lights operated (it was a complicated system so that I could use the headlight flash stalk during the day to flash all the front lights. .. driving, lo beam, hi beam, fog and spot or just flash the main beam) When I handed over the pack of documents (all service history info, MOT and all the previous tax discs and the information on the tow electrics and light wiring changes, plus a spread sheet showing all the fuel and milages, MPG records since new) the dealer commented that this was worth its weight in gold when trading in as it shows the new owner that tif the paperwork was well looked after. ... it meant usually the vehicle was too. Got a very good deal on the trade in as a result!

 

FT

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In this example, if they overload, they will just blow the 10A fuse

 

That was my thinking on adding this extra socket,

I use the same size cable as original circuit, the extension will be about 1m long. It will be protected by the same 10A fuse.

From what I know the fuse is there to serve and protect, if I overload it by trying to run a 2kw invertor then I guess the fuse will blow ;), but not a problem, I always have some 6" nails handy. ..

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But the point is new wiring should be installed so that it is not necessary to rely on a fuse blowing, when each socket should be capable of handling the amperage it was designed to take. ...

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But the point is new wiring should be installed so that it is not necessary to rely on a fuse blowing, when each socket should be capable of handling the amperage it was designed to take. ...

 

I thought the idea was to rely on the fuse blowing ?? and not the insulation going up in flames.

The new socket I am fitting will be capable of handling 10A

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If you fit a 6A socket and use 10A cable, it should be fused at 6A

If you fit a 10A socket and use 6A cable it should be fused at 6A

 

Always rate the fuse at the lowest rating of any component in the chain.

 

If you use 20A cable to supply two 10A sockets, the cable should be fused at 20A at source, then two 10A fuses for each outlet, again put the fuse near to the junction between the 20A cable and where it splits to the two 10A cables.

 

In practice, these means having fuses all over the place, it is usually better to just run two 10A cables, one to each socket and have the fuses centrally located.

 

There are available on the market 12 volt MCB's now to replace fuses. They are a lot quicker disconnecting in an overload situation, and mean you don't have to carry spare fuses with you all the time. Obviously, you pay a lot more for MCB's.

 

FT

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There are available on the market 12 volt MCB's now to replace fuses.

 

I didn't know that, interesting!

 

Steve

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