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Jockey Wheels


TJH
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I am - as yet - not an experienced caravaner so the following information might be helpful to others like me.

Having recently aquired an Abbey with an AKIO 'front end' assembly I have been a little alarmed at the difficulty of ensuring the tightness of the clamp that secures the jockey wheel.

A caravan engineer at my dealership said that the metals used to produce the locking handle (the bit you wind), and that of the clamp (the bit you wind into), are not compatible. Anybody with a little mechanical experience will know what he means - in short the threads don't run nicely. He also said that he has known of a number of caravaner's who have experienced these jockey wheels coming loose in transit and dropping to the ground.

 

His tip.

When tightening in the raised position keep shaking it from side to side to ensure better centralisation.

When tightening in the lowered position make sure the wheel is NOT quite on the ground. This again will help with centralising the whole assembly prior to winding the main height adjustment handle to lower the wheel to the ground.

 

All the best,

 

TJH

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I could have done with some jockey wheel advice a week or two ago. .. :angry:

 

Still, they say a lesson learned the hard way is a lesson learned well. ...I will make sure things are tight from now on!!

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A couple of comments. Removing the jockey wheel is not so easy on vans where it goes through the centre of the A-frame!!!

 

We had an experience with our then, 3 month old Sterling Eccles Topaz. We were on a beach site in the South of France and it was proving very difficult to lock the jockey wheel in place. By now it was full of sand so I had to do something. Off the the local Carrefour to by a tin of grease. I dis-assembled the whole jockey wheel and noticed that the handle that tightens against the shaft was slightly bent. Obviously nothing I could do about it there and then. Any way stripping down, greasing everything and putting it back together seemed to have work and have not had a problem since, although I will mention it at the first service in April.

 

David

David - Milton Keynes

Bailey Alliance 66-2 Motorhome for holidays and a Kia Venga for home.

 

Caravan Travels

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I think what the guy was saying is the metals used are not of the best quality. ..basically soft. Problem with soft threads is they distort easily when over tightened or forced because they are 'dry', this makes smooth operation in future more and more difficult. Solution is the regular use of grease on the threads and hinge. The best stuff to use is 'Copper Slip' all purpose grease.

gary1s.gif

 

Arc Systems are specialist Carver caravan product repairers, committed to providing a comprehensive service as well as spare parts for these popular heaters.

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I have noted that over the last few weeks "Copper Slip" has been mentioned a few times.

Now, unless they have changed the properties it was a grease that was highly Castergenic

Hope I spelled that correct.

The Copper slip was usualy applied with a brush

Whilst it does all that you say it does, I feel that people should be wary of skin contact. And, yes, it does prevent bolts from seizing

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Guest john1215

Yes, I can confirm that Copper slip does the business, I believe that it was my post that sparked a little interest on the old board, Copper Slip was recommended by the service dept of my dealer. They applied it for me as they had experienced problems with some other jockey wheel clamps.

Can't speak re the skin irritation as I didn't touch it.

 

john1215

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I have noted that over the last few weeks "Copper Slip"  has been mentioned a few times.

Now, unless they have changed the properties it was a grease that was highly Castergenic

Hope I spelled that correct.

The Copper slip was usualy applied with a brush

Whilst it does all that you say it does, I feel that people should be wary of skin contact. And, yes, it does prevent bolts from seizing

1989[/snapback]

 

That's me done then. ..Iv'e been using it for 40 years!!!, fingers have not dropped off yet though

Truth is given the choice I hate grease on my hands. ..of all types. Thankfully we now have disposable gloves. .if only I could remember to put them on first :(

gary1s.gif

 

Arc Systems are specialist Carver caravan product repairers, committed to providing a comprehensive service as well as spare parts for these popular heaters.

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I have noted that over the last few weeks "Copper Slip"  has been mentioned a few times.

Now, unless they have changed the properties it was a grease that was highly Castergenic

Hope I spelled that correct.

The Copper slip was usualy applied with a brush

Whilst it does all that you say it does, I feel that people should be wary of skin contact. And, yes, it does prevent bolts from seizing

1989[/snapback]

 

Is it me up the creek without a paddle?

 

Were you looking for the word carcinogenic?

 

ATB

You can not reason with an unreasonable person.

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All oil based products are carcinogenic, Copper Slip being no different, however, unless you are in constant contact with it, and you wash your hands after using it, you shoul dsuffer no great increase in health risks.

If your worried about this kind of contamination, remember not to inhale the fumes from the petrol as you fill up, this containd Benzine, which IS VERY carcinogenic, so much so, that the guys I know who work at the Fawley refinery have to have medicals every 6 weeks to check body levels.

 

Life is full of risks, just take care.

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Is it me up the creek without a paddle?

 

Were you looking for the word carcinogenic?

 

ATB

2079[/snapback]

 

 

Yeah thats it

Wonderful what a good edicayshun can do

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TJH, IS THE CARAVAN SAY FIVE YEARS OLD, & DOES THE JOCKEY WHEEL COME UP THROUGH THE "A" FRAME, IF SO CHECK THAT THE SADDLE THAT GRIPS TO THE JOCKEY WHEEL SHAFT IS NOT SPLAYED OUT, AND NOT GRIPPING THE SHAFT. SHACK.

2244[/snapback]

Hi Shack,

The caravan is the Abbey 215 GTS Vouge 2004 model and the jockey wheel does indeed come up through the A frame. I have a feeling there may have been some damage to this assembly - possibly before I took delivery as there was a chunk of tyre missing. Being new to this game it's a bit of a steep learning curve at the moment. If only I was in a position to use the caravan more often I would feel a lot more confident about a number of things.

 

Thanks for your advise, I will have to check this next time I use the van.

 

Unfortunately I don't store the caravan at home so I seem to have to re-acquaint myself with it each time I use it.

 

This web site is invaluable for us beginers. Congratulations to those who manage it.

 

Cheers,

Trevor (TJH)

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If its this new (2004) why is your dealer not replacing it?

 

Having seen Gary from Arc Systems at work I would be guided by anything he advises along these lines. (The guys a perfectionist and a gentleman)

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Hi John,

 

I took it to the dealers, where the engineer gave me the tip about the metals, and they found that the clamp bolt was a bit bent on the threads (which didn't help) so they replaced it. This also makes me wonder about previous damage.

I hope that in operating a bent bolt it has not damaged the threads in the clamp. The dealers tried it when they replaced it and thought it was OK. I will have to see how it goes next time out.

 

Cheers,

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  • 3 weeks later...
CARCINOGENIC - a substance capable of causing cancer.

(Compact Oxford dictionary)

4054[/snapback]

 

Glad I'm not the only member with a dictionary. :D

 

carcinogenic /adj.

tending to cause cancer.

carcinogenicity/n.

Concise Oxford Dictionary.

 

ATB

You can not reason with an unreasonable person.

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  • 3 months later...

If I'm not wrong copperslip contains a high level of lead as well, so has been off the preferred list for a long time. Personally I have used the stuff for years but following advice from industry keep my grubby mits off it, years ago it was applied with the fingers, I use a brush these days. No offence to Gary of Arc Systems whose contributions are well respected.

Back to original thread here, embarrassingly I managed to strip the thread on my jockey wheel clamp. Not by overtightening I may add, poor materials and construction but it still happened and I will be taking it in for this to be repaired at the annual service. It was at this time that I realised that without the clamp your are almost totally knackered. Moving the van is all but impossible. Possible by balancing the van and playing with the corner stays not preferred but hey when all else fails. I have removed the threaded bolt which hadn't got the best threads, which when combined with the threaded boss which also had poor threads as well, the inevitable happened. It was only fortunate it was on my drive the day before take off. The clamp is welded to the chassis, really helpful that makes repairs, but the chassis has been drilled where the clamp bolt would protrude if long enough on the inner edge of the chassis. I obtained a length of 12mm threaded bar with two nuts locked together on the out side and screw this through whats left of the clamp boss I have a 12mm nut on the inside of the chassis rail and clamp the whole lot up. Its a bit of a pain if you need a quick release but beats trying to manhandle 85kg plus the van weight about. I hope the service people realise that this was a material defect and not blame me for the failure. If they won't fix it, I will come up with a better set up with a quicker release as before but better engineered. It was truly a heart stopping moment though, temporarily that is.

 

Bob

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just this week ive copperslipped my cornersteady threads for the first time sinse new. I noticed a few probs though. As there seemed to be some grease left on the threads, the copperslip just either stayed on the brush, or at best, collected at one end or the other. Should I have removed all traces of grease first, or, in time with use, will both mix. As for getting it on my hands, it makes holding the brush a job and a half.

NIGEL129 Hobby 495 Ufe (2003)

Powrtouch HD BP GAS Lite User Toyota Surf 2. 4 Tug,

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