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Submersible Pump


dave

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Got our caravan out of storage today so I could prepare it for going away on thursday. Connected up the submersible pump, nothing happened. So took the pump to my local caravan dealer who checked the pump and said it was working fine. Came back home connected the pump back up to the caravan nothing happened. The caravan is only a year old so it is covered by the Bailey warranty, but am I missing something simple or is there a way of testing if power is getting to the pump. I have checked the fuse this is ok.

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Got our caravan out of storage today so I could prepare it for going away on thursday. Connected up the submersible pump, nothing happened. So took the pump to my local caravan dealer who checked the pump and said it was working fine. Came back home connected the pump back up to the caravan nothing happened. The caravan is only a year old so it is covered by the Bailey warranty, but am I missing something simple or is there a way of testing if power is getting to the pump. I have checked the fuse this is ok.

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You have tried the obvious? put the pump switch in the on position? is the battery charged?

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I had the same problem with my pump this weekend!

 

No power to pump, no power to pump fuse etc? :(

 

Turned out that while I was giving it some zzzzzzzzzzzds in the afternoon my head had knocked the pump on off switch :o

 

Paul

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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I had the same problem with my pump this weekend!

 

No power to pump, no power to pump fuse etc? :(

 

Turned out that while I was giving it some zzzzzzzzzzzds in the afternoon my head had knocked the pump on off switch :o

 

Paul

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If that doesn't cure it, put a meter across the pump socket terminals (or a 12v bulb with a bit of wire) to determine if there is power at the socket. Sometimes the pins corrode and need a clean.

 

Mike

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If you have a multimeter, with the pump power switched on, check that there's 12v at the two terminals at the water inlet socket. If there is, then there's a fault with your pump. However, it may just be that there's some corrosion on the terminals. Remove the two screws from the plug and examine the two connections inside. The spade terminals quickly corrode. Clean them and coat them with vaseline.

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

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Had the same problem this weekend with my Bailey Wyoming which is also less than a year old. Put my meter across the pump terminals (pump disconnected from caravan) and the pump was open circuit (should be almost a short circuit, i. e. a few ohms). Do I detect that there is a faulty batch of Whale pumps out there? Good thing we also had the internal water tank as an alternative.

Please don’t put grease or vaseline on any terminals as has been suggested, both are insulators and should never be applied to electrical contacts. Just keep the contacts clean and dry.

Nev and Tina

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Please don’t put grease or vaseline on any terminals as has been suggested, both are insulators and should never be applied to electrical contacts.

Nev and Tina

 

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Others will disagree with you - for instance - John Wickersham writes "The terminals should be smeared with grease or petroleum jelly."-------------Haynes Service & Repair Manual quotes, "When the connection is remade, prevent the onset of corrosion by applying a coat of petroleum jelly."

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

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I took the caravan to Mendip caravans in Newport today, although we did not buy the caravan from them it was bought from another Mendip caravan dealer who sell Bailey caravans. The service staff were very helpful and asked me to leave :) the caravan with them for the day when I picked it up this afternoon they told me the problem was a loose conector in the consumer unit.

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Others will disagree with you - for instance - John Wickersham writes "The terminals should be smeared with grease or petroleum jelly."-------------Haynes Service & Repair Manual quotes, "When the connection is remade, prevent the onset of corrosion by applying a coat of petroleum jelly."

I've not yet written a caravan manual so I'm not going to pull rank on John Wickersham whom I have great respect for, he's probably forgotten more than I know about caravans. However as a technical author I've written a few hundred technical manuals over the last 25 years on things like avionics, airframes, railways, road pavers, etc. , etc. Every industry I've worked in has always had caution notices telling operatives not to let grease into contact with electrical terminals or any other part of an electrical circuit. I'm always baffled as to why people seem to think that caravans are different! To grease electrical terminals is to start to build faults into a circuit, it may not fail straight away but sooner or later it will when you least want it to.

Nev

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I've not yet written a caravan manual so I'm not going to pull rank on John Wickersham whom I have great respect for, he's probably forgotten more than I know about caravans.   However as a technical author I've written a few hundred technical manuals over the last 25 years on things like avionics, airframes, railways, road pavers, etc. , etc.   Every industry I've worked in has always had caution notices telling operatives not to let grease into contact with electrical terminals or any other part of an electrical circuit.   I'm always baffled as to why people seem to think that caravans are different!  To grease electrical terminals is to start to build faults into a circuit, it may not fail straight away but sooner or later it will when you least want it to.

Nev

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As an ex-automotive mechanic - civvy street and RAF - we were always taught to apply protective jelly such as vaseline to exposed terminals after the contacts were applied and tightened to stop the onset of corrosion BUT this really only applied to battery terminals and this is still done.

Discovery 4 XS SDV6 and Airstream 532 plus 1996 MGF owned since new.

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As an ex-automotive mechanic - civvy street and RAF - we were always taught to apply protective jelly such as vaseline to exposed terminals after the contacts were applied and tightened to stop the onset of corrosion BUT this really only applied to battery terminals and this is still done.

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You can buy special spray for battery terminals, It looks and smells like Vaseline does the same job only costs more :huh: .

 

and like Ted says, Vaseline etc has always been recommended on battery terminals.

 

With the size of modern day wiring any help to stop corrosion is a must, when it comes to the brain well that's a different matter,

 

Just my opinion,

Paul

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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I think the spray Paul is referring to is PTFE spray, it isn't grease or vaseline and is good.

Yes modern circuits are very sensitive that's why you can't afford to put high resistances into them by insulating them with any oil based substance. Sorry to say this but there is no real alternative to cleaning terminals with a finewire brush or fibreglass brush and switch cleaner (both available from Maplin). It should only need doing about twice a year. Further keep S & N connectors dry and free of insects by wrapping them up tightly in a polythene bag and sealing the top when not in use.

Ask yourself this; "If to grease is correct then why aren't terminals coated with the stuff when they come off the production line? Why aren't light switches and weather resistant plugs and sockets filled with the stuff?"

Happy Caravanning

Nev & Tina

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On the can was battery terminal spray, it was more to stop oxidisation than anything, most batteries were in the open so suffered from the green gung which led to more sever problems, shorting etc, (silicon spray works very well! & that's in WD40)

I agree terminal, contact lubricant is in a different league totally!, to Vaseline or grease.

 

Paul,

I still can't believe I spent an hour checking the electrics, Just because I had knocked the switch <_< ,

( :( can't believe I admitted it)

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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