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Resealing Awning Rail


Bronte

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:( Good morning all,

I'm about to remove and reseal the caravan awning rail, however, am dubious about the wooden structure. Once removed I fear there may be difficulty in inserting the new screws, in as much as am sure the existing holes will not take the new screws because the wooden structure is/may be rotten. Can make fresh screw holes in new places but still unsure of strength of wooden structure.

Have read somewhere about inserting a resin/wood filler which is absorbed by the old wood and forms a strong base/structure to which new screws could be inserted, thus giving a good hold for the awning rail to be reattached.

Has anyone experience of this please. B)

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I've used the Ronseal wood hardner "stuff" before now when I had a problem around a window on my first caravan. I found the combination of this and araldite to glue the joint back together seemed to work pretty well.

 

I also re-sealed the awining rail, and several other bits, on my previous caravan. I was always very surprised when I started each job as, like you, I feared the worse. However, I found that although the original seal looked pretty dire on the surface deep down it was still doing its job.

 

The only thing I will say is that it is a very messy job and you'll need plenty of thinners to wipe off the excess mastic. Other than it being a bit of a fiddle sometimes to get the plastic inserts back in the job was a doddle.

Saab 9-3 Vector Sportwagon/Abbey Aventura 320

 

It does not matter how slow you go so long as you do not stop. — Wisdom of Confucius

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Guest manatee
I've used the Ronseal wood hardner  "stuff" before now when I had a problem around a window on my first caravan.   I found the combination of this and araldite to glue the joint back together seemed to work pretty well.

 

I also re-sealed the awining rail, and several other bits, on my previous caravan.   I was always very surprised when I started each job as, like you, I feared the worse.   However, I found that although the original  seal looked pretty dire on the surface deep down it was still doing its job.

 

The only thing I will say is that it is a very messy job  and you'll  need plenty of thinners to wipe off the excess mastic.   Other than it being a bit of a fiddle sometimes to get the plastic inserts back in  the job was a doddle.

17643[/snapback]

 

I soak the plastic insert in hot water with a little washing up liquid added it makes it so much easier!, use a bucket to soak it in

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:(  Good morning all,

I'm about to remove and reseal the caravan awning rail, however, am dubious about the wooden structure.   Once removed I fear there may be difficulty in inserting the new screws, in as much as am sure the existing holes will not take the new screws because the wooden structure is/may be rotten.   Can make fresh screw holes in new places but still unsure of strength of wooden structure.

Have read somewhere about inserting a resin/wood filler which is absorbed by the old wood and forms a strong base/structure to which new screws could be inserted, thus giving a good hold for the awning rail to be reattached.

Has anyone experience of this please. B)

17272[/snapback]

Hi Bronte

Like you i had same problem with my caravan a year or so ago & i found it necessary to reposition & drill new screw holes, also while you have the rail removed it would be a good idea to reseal the joint between roof panel & side wall. if you decide to reposition screw holes make sure you seal up existing holes properly, an extra pair of hands would make life easier too.

 

Regards Dave.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I soak the plastic insert in hot water with a little washing up liquid added it makes it so much easier!, use a bucket to soak it in

18201[/snapback]

I also tried it this way but by the time I got the insert anywhere near the caravan when I was doing it in the spring it had cooled too much. I found it better to wait until a nice warm summers day and then it slipped in not problem!

Saab 9-3 Vector Sportwagon/Abbey Aventura 320

 

It does not matter how slow you go so long as you do not stop. — Wisdom of Confucius

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Guest Hobbybod

Bronte, I've done this on a couple of 'vans (UK ones) and a big problem can be removing the rail without distorting it. Being anodised ally, restoring back to its original shape can weaken the ally and cause crazing of the anodised layer.

 

I used a cheese-wire approach to release the rail from the 'van's sides after removing the screws. This can also be tricky as screws may be rusty and difficult to remove.

 

Use a resin wood hardner to infiltrate any areas looking a bit 'dodgy' and try to use new screw positions and stainless steel screws, when replacing the rail.

 

There are two schools of thought about the sealant/mastic to use.

 

I used the adhesive sealant Sikaflex 221 (new number now). Not only does it seal, but it also acts as a strong adhesive, greatly increasing the strength of the bond of the rail to the side of the 'van, and thus lessening the strain on the screws.

However, in the unlikely event that you need to remove the rail again, it is the very devil to break the seal and remove old Sikaflex.

 

So others have use the non-setting mastic sealants. However, as these were probably used in the first place and lead to problems, I favoured the Sikaflex approach.

 

Finally it's much easier to do with an 'invaluable' assistant, and try to catch a dry spell of weather unless you can do it under cover. The resin wood hardners take ~24hrs to set.

 

Good luck, and take your time.

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