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Caravan Servicing Records


bigbilly
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I have always maintained my caravan annual service records as I do for my cars.

 

It has reminded me that my service book was not stamped last year and I must remember to pop into the dealers with the receipt and get the service book stamped.

 

But in all my years of caravanning I have never ever been asked for it despitee selling to a different dealer to where it has been serviced. I have also, on the last 3 occasions, sold caravans 'blind' by justing giving the year and model and the dealer never seeing them before exchange for the new one. I think however that there is something in the small print about unacceptable damage.

 

Are service records just not that important to prospective buyers of secondhand vans unlike in the secondhand car industry ?

 

Bill

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Beyond warrenty protection I cant see the point. If the van is checked for gas, electric and chassis safety plus damp test proir to purchase then earlier services are irrelevant. Very different for a car that might have been running on dirty oil or unchanged filters for years. .. The service in the majority just checks stuff works rather than preventative maintenance i. e. heaters and fridges dont have flues cleaned in a service the engineer simply starts it all up to see if its working and rectifies things that is found not to be working.

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Beyond warrenty protection I cant see the point. If the van is checked for gas, electric and chassis safety plus damp test proir to purchase then earlier services are irrelevant. Very different for a car that might have been running on dirty oil or unchanged filters for years. .. The service in the majority just checks stuff works rather than preventative maintenance i. e. heaters and fridges dont have flues cleaned in a service the engineer simply starts it all up to see if its working and rectifies things that is found not to be working.

 

Sorry, but I can't agree.

The running gear (wheel bearings, brakes, etc) are just as important as on a car.

If the caravan was involved in an accident that reflected a lack of roadworthiness (whether you still owned the van or had recently sold it on privately), the ability to produce proof of regular servicing by an authorised workshop could save you a tremendous amount of hassle.

 

Also, I have to say that I find the dealership whose workshop services my van to be thorough. Prior to the last service, I had found a ceiling light unit that had failed. I was in the process of locating a replacement to fit myself, so did not mention the faulty light. The van was then 2 years old and, according to the warranty handbook, this type of fitting was not covered after the first 12 months.

 

However, when I collected the van, they told me a new light unit had been fitted, and was included under warranty. When I asked the fitter if he was sure, he just said that, if it wasn't, that was their (the dealership's) problem. At the same time, a new skirt rail (to replace the one damaged by me) was supplied and fitted for only an additional £75.

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I have always maintained my caravan annual service records as I do for my cars.

 

It has reminded me that my service book was not stamped last year and I must remember to pop into the dealers with the receipt and get the service book stamped.

 

But in all my years of caravanning I have never ever been asked for it despitee selling to a different dealer to where it has been serviced. I have also, on the last 3 occasions, sold caravans 'blind' by justing giving the year and model and the dealer never seeing them before exchange for the new one. I think however that there is something in the small print about unacceptable damage.

 

Are service records just not that important to prospective buyers of secondhand vans unlike in the secondhand car industry ?

 

Bill

 

I am with Fenester on this one !

Caravan servicing is a rip off, (mobile servicing not included) but for what they do for the money !

 

How many of you who have had services, have got both Gas and Electricty safety certificates ? (you should get one each year)

I have had neither when I have had my van serviced, and when I have asked all the say is it is not a requirment (no sorry I

think they should be)

 

So as I say what do they do for the money, I recon I could do what they do for a fraction of whet they charge !!

 

Radiotwo

Steve - Land Cruiser Amazon Auto + Pageant Series 5 Champagne

The match between car and caravan is perfect in accordance with a mix of European standards. However, according to the British Towing Code the percentage (loaded caravan / kerbweight tow car) is 49%.

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Sorry, but I can't agree.

The running gear (wheel bearings, brakes, etc) are just as important as on a car.

If the caravan was involved in an accident that reflected a lack of roadworthiness (whether you still owned the van or had recently sold it on privately), the ability to produce proof of regular servicing by an authorised workshop could save you a tremendous amount of hassle.

 

Also, I have to say that I find the dealership whose workshop services my van to be thorough. Prior to the last service, I had found a ceiling light unit that had failed. I was in the process of locating a replacement to fit myself, so did not mention the faulty light. The van was then 2 years old and, according to the warranty handbook, this type of fitting was not covered after the first 12 months.

 

However, when I collected the van, they told me a new light unit had been fitted, and was included under warranty. When I asked the fitter if he was sure, he just said that, if it wasn't, that was their (the dealership's) problem. At the same time, a new skirt rail (to replace the one damaged by me) was supplied and fitted for only an additional £75.

Cars average life time mileage? versus caravan average life time mileage? My original point was if it is checked before you buy it and it is OK then previous services have little value; very different from engine wear on a car that has done 80,000 miles with limited oil changes.

 

Yes. .... bearings and brakes are important so get them checked at point of purchase. The proof of recent service and checking is the issue not the historical service record.

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I keep the service sheets and receipts but have not bothered having the book stamped (largely as I usually forget to take it with me). I do think it's important to have a record for the reasons others have stated.

Ian.
2013 Freelander 2 SD4 Auto / 2005 Bailey Pageant Vendée; 1952 Norton ES2

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I am with Fenester on this one !

Caravan servicing is a rip off, (mobile servicing not included) but for what they do for the money !

 

How many of you who have had services, have got both Gas and Electricty safety certificates ? (you should get one each year)

I have had neither when I have had my van serviced, and when I have asked all the say is it is not a requirment (no sorry I

think they should be)

 

So as I say what do they do for the money, I recon I could do what they do for a fraction of whet they charge !!

 

Radiotwo

 

Whilst I take your point the OP made no mention of cost, neither did I. I stand by what I said and would NOT buy a second hand van without seeing a full service history.

You may well disagree and buy one without . ..... your choice.

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Whilst I take your point the OP made no mention of cost, neither did I. I stand by what I said and would NOT buy a second hand van without seeing a full service history.

You may well disagree and buy one without . ..... your choice.

I agree wholeheartedly with you on this one, when i bought my first van back in 2000 i looked at two near identical vans one being a compass omega 510/5 and the other being an Elddis similar layout and the elddis had F. S. H by a dealer in the northeast although it was 8 years old and the compass only had records for the first three years then nothing after that .

Of course the compass was a grand cheaper so i bought it and guess what it was riddled with damp which was discovered when i took it for a service, cost me a £1100 to repair all the damp and the floor delamination and all the window seals were knackered as well so i got stung big time by this RIP OFF merchant who will remain nameless

The moral of the story is dont buy unless you know the van has been looked after by a reputable dealer

 

 

 

 

 

currently at C&CC Glencoe site (and its raining again)

Edited by neil and lena
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Surely, as it so easy to keep a service receipt if you have one done, why wouldn't anyone not keep it? anything to help you sell the van on has got to be useful.

Bessacarr Cameo 525 towed by SsangYong Rexton 2.2 auto in Brown.

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Cars average life time mileage? versus caravan average life time mileage? My original point was if it is checked before you buy it and it is OK then previous services have little value; very different from engine wear on a car that has done 80,000 miles with limited oil changes.

 

Yes. .... bearings and brakes are important so get them checked at point of purchase. The proof of recent service and checking is the issue not the historical service record.

I bought a 2001 caravan 3 years ago and got a full handbook history, well as i said handbook all stamped. Bought it from well known dealer in the south East. After having it 1 year i had my local mobile dealer to give full service whilst i watched and when he took the drums off there was no way they had been touched for years, lucky all was well. So handbook stamps do not mean much but actual invoice would have.

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Hi all

 

We always have our cars and caravan serviced annually by main dealers.

 

We tow on the continent twice a year and always carry the most recent service paperwork for both car and caravan, for two reasons. If there were to be an accident or breakdown, then it would be proof that both car and caravan had been serviced properly.

 

One other point, our second car is a 2003 Ford Focus that just recently showed some slight (and I do mean slight) rust on the boot. Because it had a full service history, Ford carried out a repair under warranty (Well done Ford).

 

Yossa

2007 Mondeo 2. 2 TDCi & 2003 Bailey Pageant Bordeaux

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When we bought our first new Bailey, the dealer wanted the Abbey we were p/exing in for an inspection prior to confirming the price. It was found to be riddled with damp despite being serviced and damp tested annually. But of course on the invoice, there was just a tick to say it had been done.

 

Now on our 3rd new Bailey, and each time it is serviced, a seperate damp report is given to me with the invoice, showing where they have tested the van and any external body damage down to dents. So when we changed in March this year, I just handed the Bailey box over which had all the receipts and damp reports. It gives me confidence that I am selling a decent van, and the dealership reassurance nothing untoward is going on.

 

On another point, whenever I pick up a new car, the first thing I do is make up a ring binder with photo's of the car and its details, then everytime I buy things for it they are placed in this folder. The last few cars I have scanned invoices/receipts etc and put them onto a cd, which then goes with the car. It just shows I have cared for the car.

2010/60 Honda CRV ES-T i-DTEC (Deep Sapphire Blue) and a 2009 S7 Bailey Provence.

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Cars average life time mileage? versus caravan average life time mileage? My original point was if it is checked before you buy it and it is OK then previous services have little value; very different from engine wear on a car that has done 80,000 miles with limited oil changes.

 

Yes. .... bearings and brakes are important so get them checked at point of purchase. The proof of recent service and checking is the issue not the historical service record.

 

Don't get too hung up on the differential between car mileage and caravan mileage. Car manufacturer service information advises "every 10,000 miles or 12 months, whichever comes first". In situations where a second car is owned, or the owners are elderly/retired, some cars do as little as 3,000 miles or less per year, but the 12 month maximum between services is still strongly advised; compulsory for the continuing validity of any warranty if the car is less than 3 years old.

 

Regarding dealership service being a rip-off, like all things in life it depends where you deal. There will always be the odd bad egg.

We have our caravan serviced annually.

Three years ago, we traded in our previous van for the one we have now (both vans from, and serviced by, same dealer).

Besides getting a fair deal for the new van, we got £600 over book price for the trade-in (the dealer showed me the trade guide to prove it). He said he knew the history of the van, and was happy it would be in top condition. So, obviously, he did not have to make allowances for any hidden expensive rectifications prior to resale.

 

So, the extra £600 can be described as an eventual rebate for good servicing, and peace of mind that the van is less likely to give problems. Also, if a van is less than 5 or 6 years old, failure to have the servicing carried out to schedule at a recognised workshop will invalidate the water ingress warranty.

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Don't get too hung up on the differential between car mileage and caravan mileage. Car manufacturer service information advises "every 10,000 miles or 12 months, whichever comes first". In situations where a second car is owned, or the owners are elderly/retired, some cars do as little as 3,000 miles or less per year, but the 12 month maximum between services is still strongly advised; compulsory for the continuing validity of any warranty if the car is less than 3 years old.

 

Regarding dealership service being a rip-off, like all things in life it depends where you deal. There will always be the odd bad egg.

We have our caravan serviced annually.

Three years ago, we traded in our previous van for the one we have now (both vans from, and serviced by, same dealer).

Besides getting a fair deal for the new van, we got £600 over book price for the trade-in (the dealer showed me the trade guide to prove it). He said he knew the history of the van, and was happy it would be in top condition. So, obviously, he did not have to make allowances for any hidden expensive rectifications prior to resale.

 

So, the extra £600 can be described as an eventual rebate for good servicing, and peace of mind that the van is less likely to give problems. Also, if a van is less than 5 or 6 years old, failure to have the servicing carried out to schedule at a recognised workshop will invalidate the water ingress warranty.

Yes but caravans don't have sump oil and filters, brake fluid and ATF ? A caravan service is a very different matter. If you dont change the oil in an engine regularly you reduce its life and it isn't visible on inspection that the oil was n't changed for four years earlier in its life.

 

Most of the work carried out on a caravan service is to check stuff works and then do repairs if it doesnt; with exeptions for chassis, gas test and damp test.

 

So my arguement is this. .. if you check these items and the rest of the kit at point of purchase, competentant person or workshop, then whether previous services have been done or not is irrelevant. If it is damp it is damp, if its not is is not; whether it was tested for damp for the last six years and shown on some paperwork is not that material.

 

With respect to whether caravan services are too expensive as posed by other posters in this thread: then for the time spent doing it for the work done probably not; the real matter it is whether what they do for the money you pay is actually worth doing, efficacy.

 

Do I want to pay someone to check that my heater lights or my water pump works?

 

Perhaps a road lights, chassis, gas test and damp test at a lower price might suite some customers instead of checking the obvious and doing several hours of additional labour?

 

The bottom line on this is if "You are happy to pay for the service to the work on the schedule and that makes you feel comfortable fine go ahead".

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