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Towbar To Become Mot Item


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Friend in the trade tells me that the towbar is about to become an MOT testable item. Full details not yet available but he thinks it will be limited to a visual inspection to make sure its safely secured. I doubt it will include the electrics.

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Friend in the trade tells me that the towbar is about to become an MOT testable item. Full details not yet available but he thinks it will be limited to a visual inspection to make sure its safely secured. I doubt it will include the electrics.

 

I wonder if your car will then fail the MOT if the type approval sticker/plate comes off the towbar (post 97).

Lunar Delta 520/2 towed by Omega 3. 0 Elite

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Hi,

I've never heard of any towbar failures so I wonder why it's been added? Mind I think it's a good idea to check it and it will prevent possible failure, to answer my own question,

Regards,

Ian.

Bailey Unicorn Vigo and a 2017 Ford S Max and a Mercedes SLK AMG Sport 9 speed, my mid life crisis solver.

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Hi,

I've never heard of any towbar failures so I wonder why it's been added? Mind I think it's a good idea to check it and it will prevent possible failure, to answer my own question,

Regards,

Ian.

 

Will your tester then have to check the fasteners for tightness? All adds to time to test which will add to cost, it's already around £50.

Lunar Delta 520/2 towed by Omega 3. 0 Elite

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Friend in the trade tells me that the towbar is about to become an MOT testable item. Full details not yet available but he thinks it will be limited to a visual inspection to make sure its safely secured. I doubt it will include the electrics.

 

IF it does become included in the MoT then it will, probably, be limited to rust and manufacturer's type approval plate for S reg and later cars. There's not much else to see. ;)

 

 

Continental towbar manufacturers use aluminium type approval plates whereas the U. K. tends to use printed plastic types which fade and/or wash off. Perhaps that will change.

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http://www. dft. gov. uk/consultations/closed/mot/ia. pdf

 

The reason for considering this is the incidence of "detachment of light trailers from their towing vehicles".

 

The proposed implementation date is 26th April 2009 - but I can't tell if it's been approved.

 

HI Roger,

I'm no expert but I would have thought such occurences were likely to be down to user error rather than equipment failure,

Regards,

Ian.

Bailey Unicorn Vigo and a 2017 Ford S Max and a Mercedes SLK AMG Sport 9 speed, my mid life crisis solver.

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Guest iancjc

can't see the point. ....

 

if the tow bar is ok and rated to (say) 1300kg and some moron sticks a 2t ta hobby on it - how does a visual check improve safety?

 

Will doubtless lead to less used vehicles being sold with towbar intact

Edited by iancjc
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With my detachable bar off and the removeable section of bumper reinstalled, you can't even see the ML has a tow bar, even from underneath.

 

Do you think I will have to go for MOT with the ball installed?

Not installed but declare that I have one??

What they can't see, they can't test???

 

How long before trailers/caravans need an MOT.

 

It already illegal to tow a trailer which does not have a manufacturer's name plate and serial number attached.

 

Cheers

 

Keith

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In the document from the link in the start of this thread there are several figures banded about of accidents involving trailers.

Yet in the explanatory preamble the following is stated

 

"It is necessary to try and reduce the incidence of trailers becoming detached

from their towing vehicles. While there are very few accidents of this kind in GB there

is the potential for more serious accidents to occur. Furthermore EC directive 96/96 (in

item 6. 1. 6 of annex II) requires a check of the trailer coupling mechanism. This check

does not currently occur in the MOT scheme but is done in the test scheme for heavy

commercial vehicles."

 

It sounds as though it's another Euro rule we have to adopt.

 

And check this out

Edited by Rostrevor

Enjoy yourself, whatever you're doing

RAV4 Pegasus 534

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Appears to be loose seems an odd term

Either it is loose when touched/gripped or it isn't

Appears to be would be pretty severe if for example it wagged about on tickover :rolleyes:

BMW X3 X Drive and Swift Challenger 580SE

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Quote from report says it all. .........

 

Description and scale of key monetised benefits by ‘main affected groups’

It has not been possible to quantify the potential level of road safety benefits will be delivered by the new check - because we do not have a substantial amount of information about the number of vehicles fitted with defective towing hitches.

 

They don't know how many there are but they will introduce the check anyway.

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Ohhhhhhhhhhh my type approval sticker fell off ages ago :ph34r:

Regards

SuperMike

together with

Management and Lady Faith Finesse, who is a Black & Tan Cavalier KCS - Gorgeous Girl, and my wife is as well.

Sedona 2. 9TDi - Swift Conqueror 645 LUX

CAVALIERS ARE LIKE SUNSHINE, THEY BRIGHTEN UP YOUR DAY.

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Ohhhhhhhhhhh my type approval sticker fell off ages ago :ph34r:

 

Contact the manufacturer, so long as you can provide reasonable proof of the manufacture of the bar they may well be able to oblige; I did this with a towbar from PCT leisure a couple of years ago.

"Scars are souvenirs you never loose"

2010 Swift Charisma Freestyle 550 + 2007 Nissan Pathfinder Aventura.

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Contact the manufacturer, so long as you can provide reasonable proof of the manufacture of the bar they may well be able to oblige; I did this with a towbar from PCT leisure a couple of years ago.

 

Thanks, however, I do not know the manufacturer. I asked the dealer to have it fitted when I bought the car new. Dealer not there anymore. If it becomes a problem, I guess I will have to have a new towbar fitted. More out going of money for the law abiding person, whilst the other lot get away with it all.

Regards

SuperMike

together with

Management and Lady Faith Finesse, who is a Black & Tan Cavalier KCS - Gorgeous Girl, and my wife is as well.

Sedona 2. 9TDi - Swift Conqueror 645 LUX

CAVALIERS ARE LIKE SUNSHINE, THEY BRIGHTEN UP YOUR DAY.

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As part of my purchase of a Jeep three weeks ago I got the Garage to fit a tow bar as part of the deal, they subcontracted to a local specialist firm. When I checked the electrics, they were not operating correctly, give the fitters their due they came out to my work and corrected (Earth was wrongly soldered).

 

However I wanted to put a overrun protector between the towbar and the flange a week later. I found that I could release the bolts by pressing on the spanner very gently with one finger. Oh my god I had 1. 5 tonne of Caravan attached to this the week before and it was barely tight.

 

Should they MOT it, well would you be unhappy if they found out that your towbar was loose. Do you want to be anywhere near a caravan that attached to a loose towbar. It does not need much imagination as to the devastation a loose caravan could cause. So please test towbars and test them well. Another good idea from Europe. ;)

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Scenario:

 

Transit-sized pick up truck.

 

100x50x6mm RHS formed and welded, with triangular strenghening struts to chassis rails amd 50mm towball bolted to this frame.

Hitch up a compressor, load truck with drills/cones and a wheelbarrow. proceed to destination. (See many Local Council vehicles)

 

How on earth could this type of installation be classed as 'Approved/Non-Compliant/Unsafe/Unsure?'

Like a lot of current/proposed "Consultation documents" this proposal is ill thought out and is a knee jerk response made by a jerk.

 

Will this future law apply to 'Travellers'(?)

 

I rest my case

 

Regards.

Col

Edited by BadbackCol

Proud to be a Patriot and CT Ninja
I get the feeling that beneath your sesquipedalian loquaciousness you're the same kind of fundamentalist intent on winning arguments through Argumentum Verbosium.

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It cannot be denied that there must be some sense in towbars being subjected to MoT checks. Very often, towbars can be seen which are obviously in bad condition, and a towball should be replaced if any part of its sphere falls below 49 mm in diameter.

Admittedly, most really poor (visually) towbars are usually to be found on commercial vehicles, but the existence of a towbar on any vehicle, even if visually in a state of poor maintenance, must raise the asumption that it may still be used at any time.

 

Such an MoT, in the case of detachable towballs, would presumably require the towball to be available for the purpose of confirming its condition. I can imagine that the road lighting part of the towbar electrics would also be checked by means of a plug-in unit to simulate attachment of a trailer/caravan.

Where a towbar was found to be unacceptable, repair or removal would probably be required to allow an MoT to be passed.

 

The weakness in the system would be the trailer/caravan itself, because a faulty hitch on the trailer can be just as vulnerable to a breakaway incident as the towbar/towball itself.

 

In Holland, caravans have their own independent registration plates (on trailers as well???). To introduce such legislation in the UK would incur a huge back-tracking programme, which would probably commence with any legislation being applied to new caravans/trailers in the first instance.

Implementation of caravan/trailer registration and MoT would need a dedicated approach by the government, but I think it would be a good move.

Just as it is essential for a motor vehicle to meet MoT requirements, a caravan/trailer should also be required to be safe on the roads. It is not an acceptable excuse to operate a motor vehicle in a dangerous condition; the option being not to run a vehicle if you cannot afford to maintain it. The same ethics apply to a caravan/trailer.

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As I understand it, only the visibly accessible parts of a towbar would be checked - detachable towballs and electrics don't seem to be covered.

 

I think it's a sledgehammer to crack a particle of sand - the perceived problem seems to be trailers, not towbars, and I doubt that the worst towbars ever get seen by MoT testers (you don't need an MoT test if you don't tax or insure a vehicle!)

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As I understand it, only the visibly accessible parts of a towbar would be checked - detachable towballs and electrics don't seem to be covered.

 

I think it's a sledgehammer to crack a particle of sand - the perceived problem seems to be trailers, not towbars, and I doubt that the worst towbars ever get seen by MoT testers (you don't need an MoT test if you don't tax or insure a vehicle!)

 

On the first point, I agree that in-depth checking of such things as the bracket-to-chassis security would be unworkable in the majority of cases. However, confirmation that the towbar/towball asembly (fixed ball or detachable ball) is satisfactorily maintained could be established; including a check that the towball sphere has not worn below the safe bottom limit of 49mm in diameter at any point. From that viewpoint, including towbars in the MoT is only a halfway house in the process of establishing maximum safety measures.

 

Regarding trailers/caravans, I cannot agree that you don't need an MoT test for non-taxed and/or non-insured vehicles. These parameters do not automatically remove the risks of serious accidents due to poor maintenance; in fact the reverse is the case. In too many instances, no legislative control results in failure to maintain the vehicle.

 

A recent death, which was one death too many, due to a trailer becoming unhitched, has shown that the same irresponsibility for maintaining trailers and/or towbars exists in just the same way as that for pre-MoT attitudes.

 

My towbar was fitted to my car by the dealership, and entirely subject to the vehicle manufacturer's specifications. My caravan is serviced annually at a qualified workshop which is approved by the caravan manufacturer. We are retired and not wealthy people. But caravanning is one of our passions and our finances have to accommodate our moral responsibility for the safety of others, apart from ourselves.

Clearly, my feelings support any legislation that helps to prevent tragedies caused by towed vehicles, and I am unable to apologise for that view.

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On the first point, I agree that in-depth checking of such things as the bracket-to-chassis security would be unworkable in the majority of cases. However, confirmation that the towbar/towball asembly (fixed ball or detachable ball) is satisfactorily maintained could be established; including a check that the towball sphere has not worn below the safe bottom limit of 49mm in diameter at any point. From that viewpoint, including towbars in the MoT is only a halfway house in the process of establishing maximum safety measures.

 

I was commenting on the detail of the proposal in the government consultation document - don't go giving them ideas how they can extend the test even further.

 

Regarding trailers/caravans, I cannot agree that you don't need an MoT test for non-taxed and/or non-insured vehicles. These parameters do not automatically remove the risks of serious accidents due to poor maintenance; in fact the reverse is the case. In too many instances, no legislative control results in failure to maintain the vehicle.

 

I was commenting on those who ignore the law that the rest of us abide by, most of the time.

 

A recent death, which was one death too many, due to a trailer becoming unhitched, has shown that the same irresponsibility for maintaining trailers and/or towbars exists in just the same way as that for pre-MoT attitudes.

 

My towbar was fitted to my car by the dealership, and entirely subject to the vehicle manufacturer's specifications. My caravan is serviced annually at a qualified workshop which is approved by the caravan manufacturer. We are retired and not wealthy people. But caravanning is one of our passions and our finances have to accommodate our moral responsibility for the safety of others, apart from ourselves.

Clearly, my feelings support any legislation that helps to prevent tragedies caused by towed vehicles, and I am unable to apologise for that view.

 

My towbar was fitted by me, I can guarantee it's integrity - I've seen so much shoddy work from car garages and caravan workshops to realise that their work can't be guaranteed.

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