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Fitting Mains Hook-up Socket On Outside Of House


Wirral Tourer
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I was wondering if anyone had fitted an appropriate mains socket onto the outside of their house so they can connect up the caravan to the mains when at home. We don't have a garage, so usually when we need mains power (for example - to cool the fridge before a trip) we have the cable trailing through an open window, which isn't ideal for obvious reasons

 

I've looked everywhere for an IP66 rated weatherproof socket which would receive a caravan mains lead plug but can't find one.

 

I have seen sockets on the internet but they are not weatherproof ones.

 

Does anyone know where I may find one - I assume they must exist because Caravan sites have them for mains pitches.

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We have one fitted on the outside wall of our garage - think we got the socket from our supplier. Have you looked at Towsure or Riversway Leisure?

NE Scotland

 

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I was wondering if anyone had fitted an appropriate mains socket onto the outside of their house so they can connect up the caravan to the mains when at home. We don't have a garage, so usually when we need mains power (for example - to cool the fridge before a trip) we have the cable trailing through an open window, which isn't ideal for obvious reasons

 

I've looked everywhere for an IP66 rated weatherproof socket which would receive a caravan mains lead plug but can't find one.

 

I have seen sockets on the internet but they are not weatherproof ones.

 

Does anyone know where I may find one - I assume they must exist because Caravan sites have them for mains pitches.

 

 

I've got one of these fitted to the outside wall of the house, has been there over a year and have not had any problems. .......

 

http://cgi. ebay. co. uk/CARAVAN-CAMPER-240v-...Q2em118Q2el1247

 

Mine hasn't got a large hole in the top though :rolleyes:

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Hi BRM

Have a look here:

 

http://www. tlc-direct. co. uk/Main_Index/Wir. ..ndex/index. html

 

There are a range of sockets, the normal IP rating is 56. Apologies if you already know but the first digit is for mechanical, or solids protecion and the second for water ingress. The '5' rating is 'Protected against dust limited ingress, not harmfull deposits', the 6 being totally protected against dust. The 56 rating is normal for most outside applications.

Here's a list of IP ratings:

 

http://www. tlc-direct. co. uk/Technical/Data. ..s/IPNumbers. htm

 

Hope this helps

Cheers

Paul

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Hi BRM

Have a look here:

 

http://www. tlc-direct. co. uk/Main_Index/Wir. ..ndex/index. html

 

There are a range of sockets, the normal IP rating is 56. Apologies if you already know but the first digit is for mechanical, or solids protecion and the second for water ingress. The '5' rating is 'Protected against dust limited ingress, not harmfull deposits', the 6 being totally protected against dust. The 56 rating is normal for most outside applications.

Here's a list of IP ratings:

 

http://www. tlc-direct. co. uk/Technical/Data. ..s/IPNumbers. htm

 

Hope this helps

Cheers

Paul

 

Thanks. However, tlc direct don't appear to have a caravan style socket.

 

The other style mentioned by BRM appear generally for garage use, not outdoor use, so I'd be wary of using that type.

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Thanks. However, tlc direct don't appear to have a caravan style socket.

 

The other style mentioned by BRM appear generally for garage use, not outdoor use, so I'd be wary of using that type.

 

You can use a regular socket in an IP enclosure together with this sort of convertor. This will enable you to connect the caravan and also to use this as a regular socket for other devices when required.

 

Note that the convertor is waterproof where necessary.

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You can use a regular socket in an IP enclosure together with this sort of convertor. This will enable you to connect the caravan and also to use this as a regular socket for other devices when required.

 

Note that the convertor is waterproof where necessary.

 

That's exactly what I use. Get a weatherproof enclosure/socket from B&Q. I use it for car battery charger, lawn mower, pressure washer et al.

 

http://nextday. diy. com/app/jsp/catalog/cat. ..equestid=288729

Edited by seeyoujimmy
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That's exactly what I use. Get a weatherproof enclosure/socket from B&Q. I use it for car battery charger, lawn mower, pressure washer et al.

 

But make sure it's switchable/disconnectablefrom indoors or all the neighbours will be using it for their "car battery charger, lawn mower, pressure washer et al" whilst you are away in the caravan!!!!! :P:rolleyes::unsure:

 

G.

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Thanks. However, tlc direct don't appear to have a caravan style socket.

 

The other style mentioned by BRM appear generally for garage use, not outdoor use, so I'd be wary of using that type.

Sorry, i seem to have responded to the wrong person.

Why not use a lead with a standard 3 pin plug and weatherproof socket? Just make up either a full length one that reaches to the caravan that you keep at home or a short one with the blue CEE socket on the other end as an adapter. The CEE plugs are generally IP44 unles you go for the screw in type which are IP67.

This is one the ip44 sockets:

 

 

http://www. tlc-direct. co. uk/Products/GW240. ..h16slash3S. html

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Sorry if i am putting the cat amongst the pidgeons here, but, is this legal under the new electric regs? do you not have to be part p registered to do this kind of thing now? Just a thought, as i was told this when i wanted an extra socket fitting in the van.

 

Phil.

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I think you can add a socket to a circuit, or fit a spur, as long as it is not in a kitchen.

 

I don't think caravans are subject to exactly the same regulations as houses, but some dealers may suggest it could invalidate your warranty. However most will take the sensible attitude that as long as any issues are not traced back to some DIY then there is no problem.

Jennifer

 

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Guest Rimmer

We have a 3 pin socket indoors, which connectes to a 3 pin plug which has a length of cable that goes through a hole into the outside meter box. In the meter box is a garage type 3 pin caravan conector box. Here we plug in the caravans mains cable like you would on site. However, the cable must get through the door, so we cut a small V shape out of the bottom of the door so the cable can get out and we can shut the door.

 

Cost? one outside carvan connector box and a bit of time.

 

Result? a socket that is perfectly dry and that can only be switched on in doors by us!

 

Need for an elctrician to check it over?? No, as it is classed as a normal extention cable as we were not tapping into a spur of the mains circuits in the house.

Edited by Rimmer
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Sorry if i am putting the cat amongst the pidgeons here, but, is this legal under the new electric regs? do you not have to be part p registered to do this kind of thing now? Just a thought, as i was told this when i wanted an extra socket fitting in the van.

 

Phil.

 

Well spotted,

All new circuits HAVE to be tested and certified, it is within the Building Regulations, The 17th edition of the IEE Wiring Regulations, which is now a BS, is clear in this

There are specific requirements for all new circuits and in particular, external circuits.

So be very careful before you consider DIY , non compliance with the regs is not illegal, but if an accident happens due to non compliance, non compliance will be used as evidence should legal action follow .

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We have a 3 pin socket indoors, which connectes to a 3 pin plug which has a length of cable that goes through a hole into the outside meter box. In the meter box is a garage type 3 pin caravan conector box. Here we plug in the caravans mains cable like you would on site. However, the cable must get through the door, so we cut a small V shape out of the bottom of the door so the cable can get out and we can shut the door.

 

Cost? one outside carvan connector box and a bit of time.

 

Result? a socket that is perfectly dry and that can only be switched on in doors by us!

 

Need for an elctrician to check it over?? No, as it is classed as a normal extention cable as we were not tapping into a spur of the mains circuits in the house.

 

Perhaps you SHOULD speak to an electrician, as described the way you are getting power to the caravan has its risks

Are you using any form of RCD protection, either a RCD socket in the extension from the house to your meter box, or a RCD plug on the lead out to the van, if not then any damage to the cable to the caravan may not cause the power to be shut off, and give rise to a dangerous situation

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Well spotted,

All new circuits HAVE to be tested and certified, it is within the Building Regulations, The 17th edition of the IEE Wiring Regulations, which is now a BS, is clear in this

There are specific requirements for all new circuits and in particular, external circuits.

So be very careful before you consider DIY , non compliance with the regs is not illegal, but if an accident happens due to non compliance, non compliance will be used as evidence should legal action follow .

 

Also, if you decide to sell your house, all electrical work done has to be certified and placed in the HIP (Home Information Pack) now before you can legally market your property. Bearing all this in mind, think i would get an electrician in.

 

 

Phil.

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You ARE still allowed to carry out diy but there are limitations:

 

"Part P applies to all electrical installation work carried out in dwellings. However, you do not need to tell your local authority's Building Control department about:

repairs and maintenance work or

extra power points or lighting points or other alterations to existing circuits (except in specially defined areas such as a kitchen, bathroom or outdoors)."

 

So, yes, an outside socket would have to be notifiable to the local authority.

This page may help:

 

http://www. partp. co. uk/consumer/consumer_diy. asp

 

Obviously, the work that you can do has to comply with BS7671.

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A point of clarification here if I may. ..

 

My house was built in 1951, it was re-wired in the 1980's (after I bought it), it was extended in the 1990's, it has had various spurs added to the ring main and external weather proof sockets and armourplated 4 Phase cable feeding them added to service the garden and a Koi Pond. ... all this was done prior to the regulations stipulating changes/additions need to be certified.

 

Whilst I appreciate that the regulations are required and do not in any way intend to go against them. ...

 

but how will anyone know if I add another spur/external socket, when such changes occurred?

 

Or are we saying that this whole process only "kicks-in" when I want to sell the house and that is the time that I will be required to get all the electrics certified or do I just get the existing electric sockets documented in a HIP?

 

Thanks in anticipation.

 

P. S. Forgot to say it's also had RCD's fitted to replace the old fashion fuses.

Edited by chapmag
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. ......

but how will anyone know if I add another spur/external socket, when such changes occurred?

. ......

 

because, unless you have a stash of red & black 2. 5mm (etc) twin & earth cable, all cable in B&Q etc is now blue & brown. ;)

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I was wondering if anyone had fitted an appropriate mains socket onto the outside of their house so they can connect up the caravan to the mains when at home. We don't have a garage, so usually when we need mains power (for example - to cool the fridge before a trip) we have the cable trailing through an open window, which isn't ideal for obvious reasons

 

I've looked everywhere for an IP66 rated weatherproof socket which would receive a caravan mains lead plug but can't find one.

 

I have seen sockets on the internet but they are not weatherproof ones.

 

Does anyone know where I may find one - I assume they must exist because Caravan sites have them for mains pitches.

 

Listed as splash proof.

 

http://www. screwfix. com/prods/65629/Electr. ..ocket-2P-E-IP67

 

http://www. screwfix. com/prods/45929/Electr. ..ocket-2P-E-IP44

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Whats wrong with one of these 13amp socket

 

Wire it through the wall with a 13amp plug on the inside that is plugged into an existing socket. That way it can be used for other things as well, like a lawnmower, vacuum cleaner or pressure washer.

'I know' is just 'I Believe' with delusions of grandeur

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A point of clarification here if I may. ..

 

My house was built in 1951, it was re-wired in the 1980's (after I bought it), it was extended in the 1990's, it has had various spurs added to the ring main and external weather proof sockets and armourplated 4 Phase cable feeding them added to service the garden and a Koi Pond. ... all this was done prior to the regulations stipulating changes/additions need to be certified.

 

Whilst I appreciate that the regulations are required and do not in any way intend to go against them. ...

 

but how will anyone know if I add another spur/external socket, when such changes occurred?

 

Or are we saying that this whole process only "kicks-in" when I want to sell the house and that is the time that I will be required to get all the electrics certified or do I just get the existing electric sockets documented in a HIP?

 

Thanks in anticipation.

 

P. S. Forgot to say it's also had RCD's fitted to replace the old fashion fuses.

 

 

We had an electrician in to wire in our new cooker last month. Some of the wiring fitted when we had a new kitchen installed edidn't comply to current regs. The electrician said he couldn't wire in the cooker till the wiring was sorted so a job I was expecting to take ten minutes took three hours.

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I think some of the replies to this thread show exactly why an electrician should be doing this work, AND some of the other installations mentioned .

some of the replies, suggestions,and misunderstandings beggar belief

 

( I did here quote a number of misconceptions, but then deleted so as not to either embarrass or offend posters )

 

With regard to how someone would know how old an installation is should the need to know arise,

Accessories have final inspection labels fitted, and also, a lot have a date clock/stamp embedded into the mould to show the month/year the item was made

Many new cables have telltales included in at manufacture stage

 

But having said that, we all know people will still carry on with DIY on either the electrical installation or the gas installation, and it will not be until a few fatalities caused by DIY result in prosecution, that people will sit up and take notice, and leave it to the experts, who I will accept on rare occasions are also not infallible but are accountable through their trade associations

Edited by Elldisrod
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A point of clarification here if I may. ..

 

My house was built in 1951, it was re-wired in the 1980's (after I bought it), it was extended in the 1990's, it has had various spurs added to the ring main and external weather proof sockets and armourplated 4 Phase cable feeding them added to service the garden and a Koi Pond. ... all this was done prior to the regulations stipulating changes/additions need to be certified.

 

Whilst I appreciate that the regulations are required and do not in any way intend to go against them. ...

 

but how will anyone know if I add another spur/external socket, when such changes occurred?

 

Or are we saying that this whole process only "kicks-in" when I want to sell the house and that is the time that I will be required to get all the electrics certified or do I just get the existing electric sockets documented in a HIP?

 

Thanks in anticipation.

 

P. S. Forgot to say it's also had RCD's fitted to replace the old fashion fuses.

 

 

No one would know except that at around the same time they harmonised the wiring colours from red/black with a white sheath to brown/blue with a grey sheath.

When you sell the house and the wiring is tested, it will be tested to whatever the regulations are at the time of the test, so you could have it brought up to spec now and in a few years time it more than likely won't conform. There is nothing to say however, that you are obliged to bring it up to spec. There's a difference between wiring being dangerous and not up to current regs.

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Guest Rimmer
Perhaps you SHOULD speak to an electrician, as described the way you are getting power to the caravan has its risks

Are you using any form of RCD protection, either a RCD socket in the extension from the house to your meter box, or a RCD plug on the lead out to the van, if not then any damage to the cable to the caravan may not cause the power to be shut off, and give rise to a dangerous situation

 

Yes, I forgot to mention there is a RCD plug in thing that goes into the internal socket before the cable goes through the wall. I paid about £15 for it several years ago, had it checked and was passed with flying colours by an electrician.

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