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Hyundai Santa Fe Automatic


princejim
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My friend is thinking of getting the 2006 06 Reg Hyundai Santa FE 2200 cc 2. 2 CRTD GSI 5dr Auto 5 Seats to tow a caravan, but this is not 4 wheel drive and only has traction control. Would this be ok to tow with?

If he is indeed wise he does not bid you enter the house of wisdom, but rather leads you to the threshold of your own mind.

 

Kahlil Gibran

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I didn't think they did a 2 wheel drive, are you sure? I have the latest 09 sales blerb and theres not reference to 2 WD. The GSI doesn't has electronic stability control.

Chris in Warwickshire, Elddis Odyssey 482 (2008), Mitsubishi Outlander diesel, 2017

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If this is the face lift model, then it will be quite nice to drive solo, I had a test drive in one when I was looking for the Sorento. But they are not the best tow cars. I have read they can be unstable. I believe they have Electronic Torque on Demand 4WD with Lock in function.

Swift Challenger 490

Sorento + Fabia to help the Sorento up hills!

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If this is the face lift model, then it will be quite nice to drive solo, I had a test drive in one when I was looking for the Sorento. But they are not the best tow cars. I have read they can be unstable. I believe they have Electronic Torque on Demand 4WD with Lock in function.

 

He was told by the salesman that it is only 2wd.

If he is indeed wise he does not bid you enter the house of wisdom, but rather leads you to the threshold of your own mind.

 

Kahlil Gibran

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If this is the face lift model, then it will be quite nice to drive solo, I had a test drive in one when I was looking for the Sorento. But they are not the best tow cars. I have read they can be unstable. I believe they have Electronic Torque on Demand 4WD with Lock in function.

I was led to believe they make very good, stable tow cars.

Regards
Ian

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My friend is thinking of getting the 2006 06 Reg Hyundai Santa FE 2200 cc 2. 2 CRTD GSI 5dr Auto 5 Seats to tow a caravan, but this is not 4 wheel drive and only has traction control. Would this be ok to tow with?

The Hyundai Santa Fe 2. 2 sold officially in the UK is 4wd - there is a front-wheel drive version built in the US and available in North America.

 

Some salesmen simply don't understand their product and some counter hostility to 4wd by lying - it happened to me when enquiring about a Ford Kuga - tell your friend to use a different dealer.

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I thought they were stable too? I am going off road tests, they are often contradictory. I have the Which car report out of the library at the moment. The Subaru Impretsa come near the bottom of the tested cars in the swerve test (Elk test), I admit I have never driven one, but I don't believe it.

Chris in Warwickshire, Elddis Odyssey 482 (2008), Mitsubishi Outlander diesel, 2017

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We are going to change our car hopefully at the end of the year, finances permitting. Our eldest will also be on the road by then :unsure: So we wont be looking for a 7 seater. From what I can see the Santa Fe, is a very capable motor, both the current and the old models. Most of my driving is solo and the Terrano is very thirsty, so a more economical car is what we would like. I know I can get an estate car that will do the job, but I prefer a 4x4. The Hyundai is very high on the shortlist.

Regards
Ian

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I have an 06 plate new shape Santa Fe auto - you have to press a button to bring in the 4 wheel drive, so most of the time it is 2 wheel drive. told this saves fuel. have never, as yet, had to use the 4 wheel drive when either solo or towing - excellent tow car. had the original shape model auto and that was good as well. go for it!!

Bessacarr Cameo 525 towed by SsangYong Rexton 2.2 auto in Brown.

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I have an 06 plate new shape Santa Fe auto - you have to press a button to bring in the 4 wheel drive, so most of the time it is 2 wheel drive. told this saves fuel. have never, as yet, had to use the 4 wheel drive when either solo or towing - excellent tow car. had the original shape model auto and that was good as well. go for it!!

That's not how the sales brochure reads - "4wd system - torque on demand with lock in 4wd function" - I assume that to mean variable front/rear torque under normal conditions and with fixed 50:50 torque split when the 4WD button is activated.

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That's not how the sales brochure reads - "4wd system - torque on demand with lock in 4wd function" - I assume that to mean variable front/rear torque under normal conditions and with fixed 50:50 torque split when the 4WD button is activated.

 

I assume this is the same system as the Hyundai Tucson - why would it be different?

 

In which case the car operates in front wheel drive mode permanently unless the front wheels slip, and then torque is fed to the back wheels until grip is regained. If you press the 4WD lock button it permanently distributes drive to all four wheel until a set speed is reached (18mph, from memory) and then power to the rear wheels is progressively reduced.

 

It works extremely well.

The older I get, the better I used to be

 

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That's not how the sales brochure reads - "4wd system - torque on demand with lock in 4wd function" - I assume that to mean variable front/rear torque under normal conditions and with fixed 50:50 torque split when the 4WD button is activated.

 

Don't forget I was talking about the Automatic, with tiptronic, that I beleive you can switch from auto to geared for pulling away.

If he is indeed wise he does not bid you enter the house of wisdom, but rather leads you to the threshold of your own mind.

 

Kahlil Gibran

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Don't forget I was talking about the Automatic, with tiptronic, that I beleive you can switch from auto to geared for pulling away.

Those are two seperate things surely?

 

My own Subaru, with a completely different autobox to any Hyundai, has 90 front:10 rear torque distribution under normal conditions but as the ABS sensors detect that the front wheels are starting to lose grip the torque distribution is gradually altered to 50:50 - that part of the transmission works regardless of which automatic mode is selected - Normal, Sport or Tiptronic - it's is always 4wd.

 

My understanding is that the Hyundai Santa Fe works in the same way.

 

Note for completeness - the 4wd system works differently for Subarus with manual gearboxes, and indeed automatics with high power outputs, ie 3. 0-6 and turbos.

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Tiptronic is only an overide to the auto to force it up or down a gear. If you are in tipronic mode and you increase the revs, the auto will take over and change up.

Chris in Warwickshire, Elddis Odyssey 482 (2008), Mitsubishi Outlander diesel, 2017

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you are all getting a bit too technical for me :( all i know is that, on my 06 new shape auto, there is a button to press to engage 4 wheel drive. i seem to recall reading that it then cuts out at 20mph - guess i will have to go through the manual again :D

Bessacarr Cameo 525 towed by SsangYong Rexton 2.2 auto in Brown.

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you are all getting a bit too technical for me :( all i know is that, on my 06 new shape auto, there is a button to press to engage 4 wheel drive. i seem to recall reading that it then cuts out at 20mph - guess i will have to go through the manual again :D

You're right, Ivan and that's exactly what I wrote yesterday - although I have a Tucson, not a Santa Fe. I don't think I'd bother going through the manual again - just do as I do; get in the car and drive it - brilliant :)

The older I get, the better I used to be

 

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You're right, Ivan and that's exactly what I wrote yesterday - although I have a Tucson, not a Santa Fe. I don't think I'd bother going through the manual again - just do as I do; get in the car and drive it - brilliant :)

dead right Wingco - we Hyundai'ists have to stick together :D

Bessacarr Cameo 525 towed by SsangYong Rexton 2.2 auto in Brown.

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dead right Wingco - we Hyundai'ists have to stick together :D

Can you tell me what mpg you get solo and towing ?

Regards
Ian

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Guest Rimmer

My brother has recently just bought another Hyundi Santa Fe, his is 2 wheel drive with 4 wheel drive when needed, and is defineatly classed as a 4 x 4!

His is a Auto and has towed thousands of miles over the last 3 years with his vehicles.

His new one returns about 28 miles to the gallon towing a Lunar Lexon 18ft joby.

Edited by Rimmer
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I was led to believe they make very good, stable tow cars.

 

Thats what I would have thought as well, I'm just passing on information I read.

Swift Challenger 490

Sorento + Fabia to help the Sorento up hills!

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Can you tell me what mpg you get solo and towing ?

reckon around 32/35 solo and 22/25 towing - try not to push too hard on the accelerator :D

Bessacarr Cameo 525 towed by SsangYong Rexton 2.2 auto in Brown.

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I found this while looking for something else - it confirms that the 4wd is full-time, variable torque split - the dash button simply locks to 50:50

 

 

Here are two articles I found this summer while doing research on the 07 SantaFe AWD system. Very informative. I though it would be a nice addition to this forum.

 

"Hyundai's all-wheel drive system

 

By Jim Kerr

 

Hyundai has just introduced the 2007 Santa Fe and one of the features available on this mid-size SUV is all-wheel drive. It is a new system for Hyundai and is a good example of how electronics are improving all aspects of driving.

 

All-wheel drive systems are confusing for many people. I must admit to wondering myself to what type of system is being described in the sales literature. Let's see if we can simplify it. All-wheel drive provides power to all the wheels, as opposed to front-wheel drive or rear-wheel drive systems that only provide power to one end of the vehicle. That's clear enough, but some systems are also called four-wheel drive. Those systems also drive all the wheels, but are not designed to operate in 4wd mode all the time. The driver has to select 4wd when traction conditions are poor. But operate in 4wd mode on hard pavement and you will soon be paying for expensive driveline repairs.

 

Click here to find out more!

All-wheel drive however, can be operated on hard road surfaces. Some systems drive all the wheels all the time. A viscous coupling or a variable clutch inside the transfer case controls the rate of slip between the front and rear axles. Subaru and Audi are examples of great all-wheel-drive vehicles that use these controls.

 

Many of the compact and mid-size SUVs such as the 2007 Santa Fe use a front-wheel drive system with an auxiliary rear-wheel drive to provide all-wheel drive. This is better than it sounds. Modern control systems allow the vehicle to operate with front-drive only for most driving to optimize fuel economy, but engage the rear-wheel drive as soon as additional traction is needed.

 

Hyundai's new system uses a computer-controlled clutch mechanism mounted in front of the rear axle to engage the drive. It is a Borg Warner system that can provide up to 99% of the torque to the front wheels, but automatically diverts up to 50% of the torque to the rear wheels when needed. The driver can push a button on the dash as an input to the computer, commanding it to "lock" the torque transfer at 50/50 for getting out of slippery parking spots in winter or ploughing through some soft sand. While there is no low range in the Santa Fe all-wheel drive system, it is more than capable of handling many off-road excursions.

 

Because the torque transfer to the rear wheels is variable, a dependable, durable clutch mechanism is needed that can be instantly engaged. To do this, the computer monitors wheel speed, accelerator pedal movement and steering inputs. When 4% or more front wheel slip is detected, the rear axle starts to engage. It can also anticipate the need for additional traction and engage the AWD system when the driver accelerates the vehicle. Another feature is it can disengage the rear axle during ABS events to optimize ABS stopping.

 

The computer controls a large solenoid coil in the clutch housing. When energized, the solenoid pushes against a multi-plate clutch, which in turn holds a washer-like plate from turning. Ramps and balls between this plate and a second plate cause the two plates to be forced apart, placing pressure on a second larger multi-plate clutch that connects the driveshaft to the rear axle. The path of torque is complete and the rear wheels drive.

 

A button on the dash can lock the clutch to provide 50% torque to the rear wheels, but this only occurs below 35 kph. Above that speed, the computer pulses the solenoid to disengage the clutch mechanism, but it will automatically engage it again when vehicle speed lowers.

 

Finally, the system monitors steering wheel angle. Turn the steering wheel, such as when parallel parking or turning a tight corner and the computer will decrease the torque applied to the rear wheels to there is no driveline binding during the turn.

 

Computer controls, electric solenoids and data communication between computers are all used to provide smooth traction regardless of the driving conditions and optimize fuel economy too. That's modern all-wheel drive."

http://www. canadiandriver. com/articles/jk/060802. htm

 

On the BorgWarner website I found this info.

 

" The BorgWarner High Energy ITM3e™ AWD System is the first industrialized all-wheel drive (AWD) coupling that combines a mechanical system, active gerotor pump, thermal management and new AWD control algorithms into a fully dynamic system that provides world-class performance in a package space only passive systems could achieve previously.

 

The ITM 3e™ is unlike any other active AWD product. The design features a third friction element, which provides maximum torque transfer in a package size optimized to allow installation in smaller passenger cars and crossover vehicles (CUVs). It also combines best-in-class drag torque performance, which improves fuel economy. The ITM 3e™ was recently launched in the Hyundai Santa Fe and in the Chery Tiggo produced in China. A new North American CUV program and a European high-performance application will begin production later this year.

 

The BorgWarner High Energy ITM3e™ AWD System and The BorgWarner Turbo & Emissions Systems Gasoline Turbocharger with Variable Turbine Geometry have been named finalists for the 2007 PACE Awards."

 

Guess who developed Acura's popular SH-AWD system? Thats right, BorgWarner.

 

I also read that the ITM 3e™ was also used and adapted to the 2006 and up Porche 911TT's!

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