Jump to content

Electrics Tripping


matt

Recommended Posts

When away this weekend on a CC site with electrics, we had the electric fire on at 2000w. If we turned on the kettle, the trip went in the van.

 

Could only boil the kettle if the fire was on 1000 or lower.

 

Is this normal?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Matt,

 

Seems normal to me

 

On my caravan both the heating and the mains sockets are fed through a 10 amp circuit breaker. With the heating on 2kw, this takes 8. 3amp leaving very little for anything else. Even a low wattage kettle takes 3amp

 

Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Matt,

 

I am not surprised as you would have been drawing at least 16amps. The heating running at 2Kw is drawing 8amps and your kettle would have been drawing at least 8amps,if it is a standard domestic type. The sockets and heating are usually on the same circuit breaker and can't handle the combined load.

 

Frank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

me and my wife have a fairly strict electric code in our caravan, if we have the electric heater on (it is a 1000/2000 watt fan model) we turn it off for a few mins whilst we boil the kettle, then back on after, the same with the microwave, after all its only a few mins at a time, i would buy a low powered caravan type electric kettle if i were you, and some sites don't always provide 16amp alot of sites i have been on at times only provide 10amp so if you have your kettle on and your heater on it wouldn't be able to cope with the demand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This will give you an idea of the Watts/Amps useage

 

Watts Amps

Kettle 750 3. 2

Fan Heater 1000 4. 3

TV 50 0. 2

Battery Charger 100 0. 4

Lights 150 0. 6

Fridge 125 0. 5

Water Heater 450 2. 0

Heater 2000 8. 7

1000 4. 3

500 2. 2

 

 

Regards

 

Trevor

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This will give you an idea of the Watts/Amps useage

 

          Watts Amps

Kettle            750 3. 2

Fan Heater          1000 4. 3

TV              50 0. 2

Battery Charger    100 0. 4

Lights            150 0. 6

Fridge            125 0. 5

Water Heater        450 2. 0

Heater          2000 8. 7

          1000 4. 3

            500 2. 2

Regards

 

Trevor

13147[/snapback]

 

I like your mathematics - not a very stable voltage where you took you readings!

You can not reason with an unreasonable person.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like your mathematics - not a very stable voltage where you took you readings!

13341[/snapback]

 

Actually, the figures make perfect sense (to me). But then, nobody loves a smartass . .... the higher powered appliances calculate out to a lower voltage; that's perfectly rational if the van is at the end of a long supply line and you take the putative resistance of the libne into account; as you draw more current, the endpoint volatge will drop.

 

I'll shut up now, shall I ? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest john1215
I know it's more use of gas but why not use a gas kettle?

Nev and Tina

13169[/snapback]

 

Yep we too use a gas kettle, have done for years

 

john1215

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, the figures make perfect sense (to me). But then, nobody loves a smartass . .... the higher powered appliances calculate out to a lower voltage; that's perfectly rational if the van is at the end of a long supply line and you take the putative resistance of the libne into account; as you draw more current, the endpoint volatge will drop.

 

I'll shut up now, shall I ?  :)

13384[/snapback]

 

Maybe true, maybe not - debateable at the very least, but for the 'average' caravanner, not the electrical genious, a constant voltage of 240, or even rounded up to 250 to make mental arithmatic calculations easier, would be a far more practical, sensible and logical approach.

You say 'putative' resistance - how many members, without recourse to a dictionary - would know what that meant? I don't know whether you are trying to impress others with you knowledge, or confuse people by bringing in unnecessary factors, but my purpose is to help clarify members understanding of irritating, everyday problems, not to promote my own, obvious, superiority.

 

To make comparisons you have to have constants.

To compare the current consumed by different appliances the 'voltage' should be the 'constant' by which the wattage is devided.

 

ATVB

You can not reason with an unreasonable person.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Hobbybod

Hi Matt,

 

What you have found is a fairly common occurence, especially if your trip in the 'van is set at 10Amps. Even more of a problem in France, where many of the sites' hook-ups may only take 6A.

 

The figures given by Trevor are perfectly OK for working out the general current load of different wattage appliances. (Power, W=Volts x Amps) I think there's a list at the back of the CC handbook. You only really need to remember that 1000W draws about 4. 3A and then calculate accordingly for other wattages.

 

As other have said, you may need to go onto gas for some appliances to stop this happening. You certainly don't want the embarassment of triping the site's electrics and having to go to the office and get it re-instated; all too easily done on some continental sites. No need to ask how I know . . . . . :unsure:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, the figures make perfect sense (to me). But then, nobody loves a smartass . .... the higher powered appliances calculate out to a lower voltage; that's perfectly rational if the van is at the end of a long supply line and you take the putative resistance of the libne into account; as you draw more current, the endpoint volatge will drop.

 

I'll shut up now, shall I ?  :)

13384[/snapback]

 

Hi Lets try and keep it simple (for us mere mortals please)

 

Admin

Pete.

Volvo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Lets try and keep it simple (for us mere mortals please)

 

Admin

Pete.

13474[/snapback]

Just use a gas kettle and you don't have to worry about the rest of the power hungry standard electrical accessories.

 

Now that's simple.

 

Unless of course you have lots of non standard accessories. :)

 

Frank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We were away in the van all last week,2,000 heater on, water heater on, kettle on(low watt)10inch TV,fridge on. All electric,the owner said they were 15amp hook ups,we were the only ones on site and all that used to happen was the 230v reading lights would dim a little as the thermostate cut in and out. :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Lets try and keep it simple (for us mere mortals please)

 

Admin

Pete.

13474[/snapback]

If we are trying to keep it simple just work on 1amp for every 250 watts e. g. 1000watt heater = 4amps

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, the figures make perfect sense (to me). But then, nobody loves a smartass . .... the higher powered appliances calculate out to a lower voltage; that's perfectly rational if the van is at the end of a long supply line and you take the putative resistance of the libne into account; as you draw more current, the endpoint volatge will drop.

 

I'll shut up now, shall I ?  :)

13384[/snapback]

 

No keep going. So how long a line does there have to be for the voltage to drop significantly? I'm thinking of 230v at the supply post then say 2 x 25m of 2. 5mm. And how will additional plugs and sockets in the line affect it?

 

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been told that ordinary domestic kettles are the main cause of tripping out site electrics.   We use a low wattage one, although it takes all week to boil!

13142[/snapback]

 

Have solved the kettle boiling wait time. Simple really. Forget the kettle, just drink wine and beer.

 

Si.

 

PS John Smiths tastes awful with milk & 2 sugars though

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...