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On Board Water Tank


Guest iank

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Are these worth fitting to a caravan? I believe the cost is about £110 fitted. I would imagine it would be useful on a CL especially in rainy weather and would not have a large effect on your payload.

Mind you I would prefer a larger hot water tank so you don't have to worry about running out of water halfway through a shower or waiting for the water to heat up again.

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Are these worth fitting to a caravan?  I believe the cost is about £110 fitted.   I would imagine it would be useful on a CL especially in rainy weather and would not have a large effect on your payload.  

Mind you I would prefer a larger hot water tank so you don't have to worry about running out of water halfway through a shower or waiting for the water to heat up again.

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No doubt other members will extol the virtues of an onboard tank but I bypassed ours and now pump directly from an aquarol because

1) the pump was very noisy

2) seemed pointless filling the onboard tank from an aquarol

 

If you use the caravan in very cold weather it might be worth it

Payload? assuming you are not planning on travelling with the tank full, the weight would be negligible

 

 

 

Mark

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No doubt other members will extol the virtues of an onboard tank but I bypassed ours and now pump directly from an aquarol because

1) the pump was very noisy

2) seemed pointless filling the onboard tank from an aquarol

 

If you use the caravan in very cold weather it might be worth it

Payload? assuming you are not planning on travelling with the tank full, the weight would be negligible

Mark

8990[/snapback]

 

 

I use my onboard tank on sites - but I never never travel with any water in it - it unstabilizes the caravan and I was told to always drain the tank before travelling - so the weight doesnt really come into the equation. It is great to have a tank full of water - and two aquarolls as standby - that way you can be sure you can get that shower without running out of water when you have just soaped up !! :o

 

Margaret

Margaret

 

I don't do technical !!!

Just me and my showdogs!!

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There are good points and bad points, we site our van in the season so it's nice to have water on board when you arrive. ..especially when it's raining!. If you just 'tour' as we do several times a year then I cannot see much advantage but as Margaret says it allows the aquaroll to become 'reserve' capacity. .which is why I fitted ours in the first place. .

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Arc Systems are specialist Carver caravan product repairers, committed to providing a comprehensive service as well as spare parts for these popular heaters.

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Further to my question about an on-board water tank as opposed to having just a water tank it should be linked to one of those instant hot water geysers that works on gas. Thus if you have a 11 gallon on board tank plus the two Aquarolls you will never run out of hot water while showering, even if the missus is washing the dishes with hot water and it should last you a weekend. Once the main tank is full it is just a matter of topping it up from time to time.

Why aren't vans fitted with these instant hot water geysers. The weight issue is rather negligible. I suppose you could have the electric one but may be a problem if you tend you use CLs without electric.

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Guest Hobbybod
There are good points and bad points, . . . . . . . If you just 'tour' as we do several times a year then I cannot see much advantage but as Margaret says it allows the aquaroll to become 'reserve' capacity. .which is why I fitted ours in the first place. .

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Gary, it is whilst touring that I find the in-board tank very useful. Usually travel with it ~50% full.

 

When stopping for lunch or a cuppa etc. the water is all ready to go, to fill kettles etc. and you don't need to connect up the Aquaroll or have a subsidiary water carrier full of water. Works for me!

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Further to my question about an on-board water tank as opposed to having just a water tank it should be linked to one of those instant hot water geysers that works on gas.   Thus if you have a 11 gallon on board tank plus the two Aquarolls you will never run out of hot water while showering, even if the missus is washing the dishes with hot water and it should last you a weekend.   Once the main tank is full it is just a matter of topping it up from time to time.  

Why aren't vans fitted with these instant hot water geysers.   The weight issue is rather negligible.   I suppose you could have the electric one but may be a problem if you tend you use CLs without electric.

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Due to rule changes a caravan or motorhome is deemed not have an adequate air supply to run this type of instantaneous water heater so unless fitted in an outside compartment with it's own air supply. .you cannot fit one today.

Electric ones use something like 6kw, (26amps??), which would put rather a strain on any site hookup!!

 

Gary, it is whilst touring that I find the in-board tank very useful.   Usually travel with it ~50% full.

 

When stopping for lunch or a cuppa etc. the water is all ready to go, to fill kettles etc. and you don't need to connect up the Aquaroll or have a subsidiary water carrier full of water.   Works for me!

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We always like to keep a little water in the tank but weight is the issue. .half a tank say 20 litres weighs 20kg and that can be a real problem to stop in an emergency?...dependent on where and how the tank is fitted of course. Position can also present a problem with balance and nose weight as ours does with more than say a 10-15 litres left in, the tail of the van becomes a little bit unstable. .just enough to feel it. The point is if things got nasty how would that 'bit' effect my chances of getting out of danger safely??

From my own point of view I am fitting a new tank in a better position. .just got to find the time!!

gary1s.gif

 

Arc Systems are specialist Carver caravan product repairers, committed to providing a comprehensive service as well as spare parts for these popular heaters.

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I think, from the stability point of view, any onboard tank should be either completely full or completely empty whilst towing. Water sloshing around is the last thing you want. Anyone who has towed a horsebox will know what happens when the horse moves slightly! Personally from preference, I tow with the tank full as it is mounted very close to the axles and its full weight does not put the caravan over the MTPLM. If it were placed towards the either end of the caravan (as some are) I wouldn't entertain the thought of leaving water in it whilst towing - and that defeats the point of having the tank in the first place.

Regards,

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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The analogy with a horse is not really valid. A horse has a very high centre of gravity and weighs many times more than any water tank I've seen! If a few litres of water sloshing around is going to produce instability in a 1000+kg caravan then you must have an instability problem to begin with. In Aus every caravan has a water tank (typically 60 litres) and some have two. Whether you tow with a full or empty tank is not a stability issue but a logistical one - will you always be staying at sites with good water provided or will you be venturing into areas of less reliable water availability and/or quality?

 

Stephen.

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The analogy with a horse is not really valid. A horse has a very high centre of gravity and weighs many times more than any water tank I've seen! If a few litres of water sloshing around is going to produce instability in a 1000+kg caravan then you must have an instability problem to begin with. In Aus every caravan has a water tank (typically 60 litres) and some have two. Whether you tow with a full or empty tank is not a stability issue but a logistical one - will you always be staying at sites with good water provided or will you be venturing into areas of less reliable water availability and/or quality?

 

Stephen.

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B) Hi.

I quite agree with Stephen, It is the location of the tank that is the issue not the volume of water, I tow with on average 20-30 litres and no problem, I fitted the tank myself directly over the axle, and it has never given me any trouble, it is also very convenient when arriving on site, or stopping en-route for a cup of tea.

T. B)B)B)

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The analogy with a horse is not really valid. A horse has a very high centre of gravity and weighs many times more than any water tank I've seen! If a few litres of water sloshing around is going to produce instability in a 1000+kg caravan then you must have an instability problem to begin with. In Aus every caravan has a water tank (typically 60 litres) and some have two. Whether you tow with a full or empty tank is not a stability issue but a logistical one - will you always be staying at sites with good water provided or will you be venturing into areas of less reliable water availability and/or quality?

Stephen.

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Hi sfrawley48 and tommytruck,

I don't intend to get into an argument here, but a horse moving weight from one leg to another in a horsebox, (heavy weight / short distance) is actually very close to the effect of a much smaller mass of water slopping in a badly positioned onboard water tank (light weight / long distance). Believe me I've towed twin axle horse boxes and long twin axle caravans many thousands of miles over the last thirty-something years, and in all cases the trailers were perfectly stable, but the feel on the steering wheel when the load moves slightly is remarkably similar in all cases.

Best regards to all,

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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I agree that the position of the tank must have a lot more to do with the stability than whether is's full, empty or half full and of course the construction of the tank - does it have baffles etc? - will also make a huge difference.

 

I spent some time towing fuel and water bowsers whilst serving with the RAF and never had an accident because they were half full.

 

I thought the idea of not having water on board when towing a caravan was more to do with the weight than anything else

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Sadly there were / are no baffles in the onboard water tanks used in the caravans I've owned. This is not an issue if the tank is over the axles and either full or empty. But back to the original question, I believe an onboard tank is most definitely an improvement to the whole caravanning experience.

Cheers all,

Gordon.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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Just as an aside, from what I've read so far about UK caravanning it seems that your caravans are not designed to be connected to a mains water supply. Is that correct?

 

Stephen.

9739[/snapback]

 

In general No but we do have 'adaptors' to cut down the pressure so direct connection is possible and becoming quite popular for connection to a 'super' pitch'.

My point about instability due to the 'weight' of water is valid in the UK due to very different chassis design and overall weight in general?, Oz vans have I believe a far heavier chassis which would make 'inbalance' much less of a problem. The other point is. .inboard tanks over here are rarely fixed down well enough to cope with their full weight if involved in 'avoiding' an otherwise no harm done accident

gary1s.gif

 

Arc Systems are specialist Carver caravan product repairers, committed to providing a comprehensive service as well as spare parts for these popular heaters.

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In general No but we do have 'adaptors' to cut down the pressure so direct connection is possible and becoming quite popular for connection to a 'super' pitch'.

My point about instability due to the 'weight' of water is valid in the UK due to very different chassis design and overall weight in general?, Oz vans have I believe a far heavier chassis which would make 'inbalance' much less of a problem. The other point is. .inboard tanks over here are rarely fixed down well enough to cope with their full weight if involved in 'avoiding' an otherwise no harm done accident

9743[/snapback]

 

I don't know how your vans are constructed but ours generally have a ladder chassis with either a wooden or aluminium frame and pressed metal exterior. My 17'6" dual axle weighs about 1400kg empty. The water tank is part of the design and is mounted securely underfloor just behind the axle.

 

Almost every pitch (or site as we call them) has mains water, electricity and a drain point. The van is plumbed for mains-pressure water and it's simply a matter of connecting a length of hosepipe from the tap to the connector on the van.

 

Stephen.

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Ladder chassis. .yes that's what I was told and perhaps still necessary for the type of rough roads/terrain you encounter. Not so over here, if you condensed the essential metal parts of a 'modern' chassis down and attached a handle. ..you could pick the whole lot up with one hand? My own van is the same length as yours and being supposedly 'dated' has a welded ladder chassis but of pressed steel and no axle!, using trailing arms and springs. Empty it weighs only 980kg although it had everything a modern caravan has today as it left the factory!!. UK vans today would be around 1350kg for the same length. ..fully loaded. .so although weight has been saved on the chassis, overall weight is rising given a 250kg payload.

 

"Almost every pitch (or site as we call them) has mains water, electricity and a drain point".

 

Yes this would describe a 'super pitch' over here and they are becoming more common. ABI built vans in the mid 80's with ability to connect direct to these services. .ahead of their time? as few if any have that ability now. Personally though with the exception of electric I can cope with a bit of fetching and carrying for the rest. .must be a Pom thing?? ;)

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Arc Systems are specialist Carver caravan product repairers, committed to providing a comprehensive service as well as spare parts for these popular heaters.

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"Personally though with the exception of electric I can cope with a bit of fetching and carrying for the rest. .must be a Pom thing??"

 

Yes, but it hardly seems fair does it? Those with the colder and wetter weather have to go out into it to fetch and carry water!

 

Stephen.

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Yes, but it hardly seems fair does it? Those with the colder and wetter weather have to go out into it to fetch and carry water!

Stephen.

9944[/snapback]

 

Touché..mate

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Arc Systems are specialist Carver caravan product repairers, committed to providing a comprehensive service as well as spare parts for these popular heaters.

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