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Bailey increase payload on all models


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Bailey are increasing the MTPLM across all ranges to give better payloads on all 2022 models. According to Practical Caravan. Will others follow suit? Is it just offering what was previously available via a plate upgrade?

Edited by Gordon
Prscticsl Csrsvan edited to read Practical Caravan
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  • WispMan changed the title to Bailey increase payload on all models

I believe the only 2022MY vans that they've launched so far are the U5's and it looks like you're partly right. 

 

The 2 berth Seville has 1415kg MTPLM and can be upgraded to 1450kg. The Cadiz, on the other hand has a 1600kg MTPLM and no upgrade available. The published payload is 177kg, which is 10kg or 20kg more than most similar 4 berth single axle vans usually get. The Madrid has 1500kg and no upgrade possible. The Vigo and Cabrera are the same as the Cadiz. The two twins are upgradeable.

 

It probably boils down to how close the MTPLM would be to the axle weight if the minimum payload formula was applied. If the Cadiz, for instance, had the normal 155kg or so then its MTPLM would be 1578kg with just a 22kg upgrade possible. So why not just put it to 1600kg and reduce the messing about.  

 

They could also be using it as an experiment to assess dealer feedback as to whether they feel they lose any sales by having a slightly higher weights. 

 

It reminds me of my old Rimini S2 where the axle limit was 1500kg and the standard MTPLM was 1495kg or close to that. No upgrade possible. To make matters worse with those vans the central chest was a cost option and used 13kg of your payload.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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It is about time someone did this as many have stupidly low figures presumably designed to make the caravan sell better but in reality exposing purchasers to possible overloads. Bailey do have some good ideas and should be praised when the apply them even if their service levels can be lacking.

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I would say that Bailey's service levels are better than other caravan brand. They're the only one who let owners buy spare parts direct and not have to go through a dealer. 

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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They just need to improve factory build - poor dealers pick up the mess! 

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2 hours ago, djadria said:

They just need to improve factory build - poor dealers pick up the mess! 

 

The biggest recent problems they've had have been designed into the vans and should have been designed out before production commenced. The production line can't remedy something that is wrong from the CAD stage.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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True - the floors are weakest link - and a lady on Facebook has had a roofstrap leak on her brand new van - so that rears it’s head again! 
 

I like Baileys - I just wish they’d concentrate more on the shell now - Alutech is becoming dated! 

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Dated in what way??  ( the outer skin is no longer Aluminium sheet and hasn’t been for some years now) 

 

Cars have used a metal outside skin for a very long time now, does that make the design dated?

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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Actually Mr P - a lot of my car is plastic now.
 

what I meant was - they need to move on with Alutech 2!

 

improved floors / improved water management / improved leaky roof straps etc - just generally make it better. The concept is good  but needs to move on.

 

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They must be  making good vans surely they concentrate on the build as it can't be economic to  speed up production to then pay dealers thouands of pounds to repair 

i have been happy with Bailey 

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Dealers only get half their hourly rate for warranty issues - that is part of the deal to be allowed to be a dealer.

 

A dealer told me - anon- that Bailey know there are issues with rotting floors - but do nothing about it as it takes about 6 years to become an issue ( when warranty finishes).  My friend is just having hers repaired at end of 6 years - just within warranty - as the rear steady is going through floor due to rot,  on a separate note - my 12 month old is going to Bailey factory in Jan to have its chassis removed (whole) due to delimitation.  So the floors could be engineered better, eg composites sandwich to edge of floors not a wooden bridge - and a GRP outer lower panel like all standard swifts now.  They are just ignoring the elephant in the room.

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A thought has just occurred to me. Production rates at all caravan makers have been reduced due to action taken to reduce covid risk. Will the longer time being allowed for assembly result in better quality final products?

My initial thought was that it might, but knowing how production has been simplified to an almost Lego like basis with no real skill involved I'm not so sure.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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24 minutes ago, Steamdrivenandy said:

A thought has just occurred to me. Production rates at all caravan makers have been reduced due to action taken to reduce covid risk. Will the longer time being allowed for assembly result in better quality final products?

My initial thought was that it might, but knowing how production has been simplified to an almost Lego like basis with no real skill involved I'm not so sure.

 

Surely reducing assembly to require the lowest level of skill is no bad thing, it's easier to get simply task done "right", than one requiring special skills?

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46 minutes ago, Steamdrivenandy said:

A thought has just occurred to me. Production rates at all caravan makers have been reduced due to action taken to reduce covid risk. Will the longer time being allowed for assembly result in better quality final products?

My initial thought was that it might, but knowing how production has been simplified to an almost Lego like basis with no real skill involved I'm not so sure.

They are doing this due to less workers allowed per van - so this is why productivity slower!

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2 hours ago, JTQ said:

 

Surely reducing assembly to require the lowest level of skill is no bad thing, it's easier to get simply task done "right", than one requiring special skills?

 

Absolutely right, except for human nature.

 

Generally a job that requires special skills is paid more and the worker is more motivated to do a skilful and correct piece of work to justify their worth.

 

Remove skilled activities and simplifying stuff means you can employ unskilled labour at lower rates and they may have less interest in performing what they have to do in a proper manner as they're not justifying a higher pay rate.

 

It's the old 'employ monkeys' syndrome.

 

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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Keep it a task requiring skill, and in a market where the buyer  is just bottom line focused so the employer can't fund staff particularly well and the outcome is the worst.

What we have in this industry now when the original skilled crafted vans like Castleton and the earlier Carlights, as examples, found insufficient punters; basically, we end up with only what "we" as a collective "want" to pay for.

Our only hope is introducing processes and technologies where the artisans can't get it seriously wrong, though far more likely, as history teaches, import from a more focused supplier.

 

 

Edited by JTQ
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12 minutes ago, JTQ said:

.

Our only hope is introducing processes and technologies where the artisans can't get it seriously wrong, though far more likely, as history teaches, import from a more focused supplier.

 

Or get them assembled by robots who replicate a particular task  tens of  thousands of time without any variation at all. Works for cars doesn’t it?? 

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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Actually the payload on the U4 Cabrera (replated) was 163kg, the U5 Cabrera has 161kg so a decrease there. Also U5’s are around 50kg heavier which with the move to EV’s is not the direction Bailey (and others) should be going in.

Edited by Bobsandy
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It’s only the sale of new ICE powered cars that will be banned, and that’s still 8+ years away.

 

There will still be millions of diesel/petrol cars around in circulation for many years after that.  I wouldn’t be at all surprised if the value of used ICE vehicles increases once they are no longer available new.

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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They might put an electric motor in the caravans to push the cars along a bit if the can’t manage! 😆😆👍

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1 hour ago, Mr Plodd said:

It’s only the sale of new ICE powered cars that will be banned, and that’s still 8+ years away.

 

There will still be millions of diesel/petrol cars around in circulation for many years after that.  I wouldn’t be at all surprised if the value of used ICE vehicles increases once they are no longer available new.

Quite agree with the logic, what will be the problem is the price of Diesel & Petrol when these cars are no longer made and the probable tax applied by governments to ''encourage electric vehicles''

The major oil producers will reduce output in response and we all know what that does to the price.

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It will be a brave Govt that whacks extra tax on ICE vehicles for the simple reason that will have a disproportionate, and huge,  effect on those who are least able to invest in an EV.

 

For those with plenty of money the change will not be too painful, but those at the bottom of the ladder, with only a few thousand pounds at their disposal to change cars will simply not be able to go electric or hybrid. 

 

No votes in whacking those with the least 

 

I still reckon the date for the ban on ICE will “slip” in a few years time. Something along the lines of........

 

“We set this optimistic target in the belief that battery technology would advance at a pace. That advancement hasn’t been made so we need to review the date to ban the sale of ICE cars” 

Edited by Mr Plodd

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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It will by Hydrogen engines realistically 👍

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8 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

 

Or get them assembled by robots who replicate a particular task  tens of  thousands of time without any variation at all. Works for cars doesn’t it?? 

 

The reason caravan makers haven't adopted robots, like the car industry  is money. The capital deployed in car assembly is in £ billions, or at least £ millions. The capital employed on caravan assembly is counted in the odd £100k. 

 

It's the same old problem, the volume just isn't there.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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It is at the moment 😂😳

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