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Weighed the caravan


KontikiKid
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Decided to call in at our local weighbridge on the way home this weekend...... obviously as former motor homers we are used to travelling with everything from four kettles, to enough clothes to explore the arctic. Weighed the caravan and the old girl has a total permitted mass of 1630kg....... threw her on to the weighbridge, and unbelievably - 1630kg! Deep joy! If we had been over, I think that would have been another argument in a box!

 

We are, at 1630kg, on the cusp, and looking around the caravan now, the best thing to chuck in the car would be the two reclining garden chairs which are around 12kg each. We had already prior to departure put the bottles of spirits, mugs and three bags of stuff in the car. What is rather worrying though is the amount of empty cupboards and storage spaces we have. It must be very, very easy to over load and me being from bus/lorry and other backgrounds, won't take any chances with the weights. 

 

Overall, given how we have had to adapt, we are quite pleased, but will allow for experimental error and weigh it again next weekend on another bridge. 

 

The motorhome could carry almost one tonne, and usually, on the way back from Italy/Calais/wine and beer top up, we were as high as 4980kg against 5000kg MAM and that was with minimal fresh water on board as we were on our way home. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Online blog and travels, although sometimes there is a lack of travel due to work!

 

It's an uncharted sea, it's an unopened door but you've got to reach out and you've got to explore.

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1 hour ago, KontikiKid said:

Decided to call in at our local weighbridge on the way home this weekend...... obviously as former motor homers we are used to travelling with everything from four kettles, to enough clothes to explore the arctic. Weighed the caravan and the old girl has a total permitted mass of 1630kg....... threw her on to the weighbridge, and unbelievably - 1630kg! Deep joy! If we had been over, I think that would have been another argument in a box!

 

We are, at 1630kg, on the cusp, and looking around the caravan now, the best thing to chuck in the car would be the two reclining garden chairs which are around 12kg each. We had already prior to departure put the bottles of spirits, mugs and three bags of stuff in the car. What is rather worrying though is the amount of empty cupboards and storage spaces we have. It must be very, very easy to over load and me being from bus/lorry and other backgrounds, won't take any chances with the weights. 

 

Overall, given how we have had to adapt, we are quite pleased, but will allow for experimental error and weigh it again next weekend on another bridge. 

 

The motorhome could carry almost one tonne, and usually, on the way back from Italy/Calais/wine and beer top up, we were as high as 4980kg against 5000kg MAM and that was with minimal fresh water on board as we were on our way home. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi ex Kon Tiki owner. We have just become ex Hymer in to a Bailey caravan. Thought we were unusual going from van to tugging. We have yet to get to the weighbridge but agree lots of opportunity to load up. Awaiting in post a increased weight sticker from Bailey costing £55.00 giving us a whopping extra 91kg 😁

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91kg is a pretty decent upgrade amount, I had to make do with 50! 

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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14 hours ago, GARYSJ said:

Hi ex Kon Tiki owner. We have just become ex Hymer in to a Bailey caravan. Thought we were unusual going from van to tugging. We have yet to get to the weighbridge but agree lots of opportunity to load up. Awaiting in post a increased weight sticker from Bailey costing £55.00 giving us a whopping extra 91kg 😁

 

Hi

 

I don't think we have the option of a plate upgrade "easily". That said, we bought the caravan as a toe in the water with a view that, "if we like it", we will buy a Hobby twin axle from Germany for which we can add 500kg to the payload, so would have around 700kg all told. 

 

In all probability, we will likely return to motorhoming as so far, we are finding caravaning too faffy on many counts. 

Online blog and travels, although sometimes there is a lack of travel due to work!

 

It's an uncharted sea, it's an unopened door but you've got to reach out and you've got to explore.

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The MTPLM figure of 1630kg is a contrived figure based on the MIRO, plus an allowance for each occupant and various items of equipment and fluids. SDA would explain it more succinctly. The caravan should have a metal plate somewhere with the VIN and the maximum axle loads.On recent Baileys, it's in the side gas locker. This will be the limit set by the chassis manufacturer and will be in round units of 50 or 100kg.So more than 1630, but by how much? 

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6 hours ago, KontikiKid said:

 

In all probability, we will likely return to motorhoming as so far, we are finding caravaning too faffy on many counts. 

 

You will soon learn to adjust, if you want to that is.

 

We did the change a few years back now and, like you, we initially thought the same, but are now more than happy we came over to “the dark side” ;)

 

We have lost the “spontaneity” that is part of the appeal of having a MH, but we now have the ability to “set up home” on a site and that includes setting up an (air) awning which provides a lot more space, which is very acceptable if the weather doesn’t play fair with us, a couple of rainy days spent cooped up in a MH can bring on severe “cabin fever” (depending on the size of MH of course) A huge advantage fir us is we still have the car to do the shopping, and visit wherever we wish to go without the issue of  “is access possible with a MH “  (Car parks can be very unfriendly to MH’s)

Don’t underestimate how much easier having a car to get around with is. 

 

It is of course yours, and no-else’s decision to make, but I am getting the impression  you have, sadly, already made your mind up, and that’s before being able to explore the differences fully. 

 

Stick at it and be positive ! 

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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10 hours ago, KontikiKid said:

In all probability, we will likely return to motorhoming as so far, we are finding caravaning too faffy on many counts. 

In all probability we will never change to a MH as it’s far too faffy on many counts.

 

Cant lounge properly, can’t explore, can’t park, can’t move an inch without packing away every single thing, can’t pop out for shopping, can’t get my head around that huge empty space called a “garage”,  etc etc.

 

I await you list with interest!

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Having had both I am sure I could spend 30 minutes and convince you that the only logical thing to do is have a MH.

 

Then spend the next half an hour convincing you that that you should get a Caravan. 

 

I have  pal who is a committed MH owner and he keeps berating me for going to the dark side. I keep telling him we take the same type of holidays, we just go about them in a slightly different way.

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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8 hours ago, Allan Guest said:

In all probability we will never change to a MH as it’s far too faffy on many counts.


Same as us but every time I read the CMHC magazine it seems that they have decided that “their masses” WILL switch to a motor home through the power of media influence!

2018 Volvo V90 and 2018 Swift Sprite Quattro EB

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A fairly big “influencer” in regards to changing is the huge price differential. It’s quite easy to buy a new caravan and tow car for the cost of a new mid range MH. The differential remains pretty much the same for used as well. A decent 5-10year old 7-8m used MH (not a camper van) will set you back in the region of £30k+ There are cheaper ones, but they are cheaper for a reason.

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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Yep, we’re all different with different priorities, finances etc, but there definitely seems to be a big MH push from the media influencers. The CMHC magazine seems to gain a bit more MH influence every month, if that’s the membership trend then fair enough. I also noticed the Motor home and Caravan Show being advertised, I’m sure it used to be called the Caravan and Motor home show?

 

I have more friends with MH’s than caravans but it’ll always be a caravan for us. Long May the freedom of choice be there, I just hope the clubs don’t start to neglect the needs and interest of their loyal caravan members over time.

2018 Volvo V90 and 2018 Swift Sprite Quattro EB

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It's not only the purchase price of car/caravan versus motorhome that counts, but also the continuing fixed costs. Few have just a motorhome and no car at their disposal, so there's the extra cost of maintenance, tax and insurance of a motorhome to contend with, which in total will be a lot more than for a caravan.

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I am not convinced it’s “The Media” leading the way, rather than them simply following the trend.

 

When I first started motorhoming I saw very few other MH’s on the road indeed. They then started becoming a more and more frequent sight. These days they are even more common. So my view is that the clubs and media are recognising the rapid increase in MH numbers and trying to be more inclusive of them,

Rather  than acting as  leaders  they are simply  just following  the trend. 

 

Another factor might be that as we approach 2030 the availability of cars, especially electric ones,  capable of towing a half decent sized caravan will naturally decrease. I don’t think the restriction in ICE vehicle purchases will encompass “commercial” vehicles which, of course, most, if not all MH’s are based on (Ford Transit, Fiat Ducato, Mercedes Sprinter etc) So MH ownership could be rising as a result of the perception, and don’t forget the increase in personal wealth which is exemplified by (some) people being somewhat short sighted and taking great lumps out of their pension pots to buy MH’s

 

Well that’s my take on the situation, I could of course be totally wrong though. 

 

 

7 minutes ago, Lutz said:

It's not only the purchase price of car/caravan versus motorhome that counts, but also the continuing fixed costs. Few have just a motorhome and no car at their disposal, so there's the extra cost of maintenance, tax and insurance of a motorhome to contend with, which in total will be a lot more than for a caravan.

 

Actually, having run both, the financial cost of each is very similar the only real difference being VED and, if old enough, MOT.  Caravans still require insurance, servicing, tyres etc and the costs are fairly comparable. 

Edited by Mr Plodd

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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I think really they are quite different and they both have advantages and disadvantages. Both my partner and I have come from families which took camping holidays as long as we can remember. Her's mostly in a trailer tent, mine initially in frame tents later moving to caravans.

 

A few years back we went on holiday to Canada and had a motorhome for 3 weeks covering a couple of thousand miles of the usual sights in Canada. For that kind of trip you can't beat a motorhome; Traveling every other day at least so little need to break camp just to pop to the shops; Having the ability to pull in to make lunch or dinner wherever has the best view; Canada being similar to America in that large vehicles are accommodated everywhere certainly helped.

 

After we came home we bought a little campervan with the aim that it would also be a second vehicle for general stuff. Unfortunately it's a high top which I've found pretty limiting, especially in the area in Surrey we live where most places have height barriers for obvious reasons. On site the living accommodation is pretty small, doubly so now that we have a small child. Having a child prevents us from taking a "casual" approach to where we park up so we lose any advantage there. Subjecting the driving area to the whims of a toddler is less than ideal too.

 

We've just bought a Seat Tarraco which next year will become our tow car if some of the current demand subsides.

 

 

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10 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

Having had both I am sure I could spend 30 minutes and convince you that the only logical thing to do is have a MH.

 

Then spend the next half an hour convincing you that that you should get a Caravan. 

 

I have  pal who is a committed MH owner and he keeps berating me for going to the dark side. I keep telling him we take the same type of holidays, we just go about them in a slightly different way.

Oh no you couldn’t!!

We considered a MH back in 2009 when I retired and had the means, pension lump sum, to purchase.

We viewed several,  new and second hand, and decided it was not for us after realising that any we could afford, or liked, would not have anywhere near adequate space for our impending Grandchild’s travel cot.

 

Our closest friends, and holiday buddies, have an Autotrail and our trips include much mickey taking from both sides.

 

We are both happy with our choices, and would describe ourselves as “campers”, but being on site for the last two weeks has just reinforced our view that a MH is not for us.

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43 minutes ago, Mr Plodd said:

Actually, having run both, the financial cost of each is very similar the only real difference being VED and, if old enough, MOT.  Caravans still require insurance, servicing, tyres etc and the costs are fairly comparable. 

 

I've never heard of caravans requiring an oil change or repairs due to clutch failure, for example.

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True, but caravans do still require servicing.

 

As for clutches well they don’t need replacing ever year or so do they? If they do them I am afraid is down to driving style! I have driven many many vehicles (most of them well used until a few years ago) of all shapes and sizes, for the best part of 50 years. I have only had to replace one clutch, and that was on a 100k plus miles Citroen BX where the diaphragm spring in the pressure plate failed. I have had Fiat based motorhomes that have clutches basically made out of cheese and never needed to renew them. 

One car I purchased at 30k knowing its history. Sold it at 175k and it was still on the original clutch so, like I said, clutch wear is directly related to driving style/ability. Police patrol cars usually did 100k plus on a single clutch. 

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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11 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

Having had both I am sure I could spend 30 minutes and convince you that the only logical thing to do is have a MH.

Then spend the next half an hour convincing you that that you should get a Caravan. 

Well said. We've had both motorhomes and caravans and liked them both for different reasons.

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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11 minutes ago, Gordon said:

Well said. We've had both motorhomes and caravans and liked them both for different reasons.

 

I have absolutely no doubt that you, me or Andy could make an argument for either.

I have presumed that is what people do when considering which will suit them-which is why we have a caravan and our friends have a MH.

If either is the 'best' that is almost always down to the owners preferences.

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We started 'mobile' holidaying by hiring RV's in America, Canada and Alaska. The vehicles were large and the countries likewise with facilities everywhere for them. Our holiday style also suited a MH in that we were touring and moving on every couple of days at least.

When circumstances dictated we needed to holiday closer to home (UK/Europe) we considered MH and caravan but our holidays were going to be based mainly in one place for a couple of weeks at a time. In the end we started with a small caravan because we already had a car capable of towing it. We liked caravanning but not bed making(!) so we soon upgraded to a twin axle fixed bed and have gone on to eventually replace with a new similar van.

MH and caravans each have their place and it really depends on your use and requirements as to which is best. We like space and our 8ft wide caravan with large awning gives us plenty. I would only consider a MH if it were sufficiently large and could tow a small car behind for local excursions but to get the equivalent space of my van would be extremely expensive!!

Interestingly my brother who until recently had a MH has just transferred to a large caravan because he was increasingly envious of the room afforded in my rig. To date he doesn't regret it.

Life is not a rehearsal . . .:)

Porsche Cayenne S Diesel & Knaus StarClass 695. Previously Audi S4 Avant & Elddis Super Sirocco

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17 hours ago, Allan Guest said:

In all probability we will never change to a MH as it’s far too faffy on many counts.

 

Cant lounge properly, can’t explore, can’t park, can’t move an inch without packing away every single thing, can’t pop out for shopping, can’t get my head around that huge empty space called a “garage”,  etc etc.

 

I await you list with interest!

 

Lounge - better in our old motorhome than the caravan. 

 

We didnt pack anything away. The kettle stayed on the work top, as did the toaster. The TV's in situ. We tried the caravan with the kettle on rubber matting but sure enough it was on the floor. 

 

We would take it and park it anywhere - Tesco's, B&Q, what ever. Even easier overseas with free motorhome stopvers in many towns and villages - even major city centres

 

Our garage contained two bikes, washing machine, two reclinging chairs, two sun loungers, masses of dog food, beer, upto 200 bottles of wine etc

 

Cost to insure the motorhome with a pay out value of £102,000 was less than to insure the caravan! 

 

We are away again this weekend so will report back. The concept or caravanning - especially with a Hobby with a decent payload appeals, but there's just a lot of faffing. It's may a reason why in winter, a lot of sites have more motorhomes on than caravans. 

Online blog and travels, although sometimes there is a lack of travel due to work!

 

It's an uncharted sea, it's an unopened door but you've got to reach out and you've got to explore.

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4 minutes ago, KontikiKid said:

 

Lounge - better in our old motorhome than the caravan. 

MH MUST BE HUMONGOUS!

 

We didnt pack anything away. The kettle stayed on the work top, as did the toaster. The TV's in situ. We tried the caravan with the kettle on rubber matting but sure enough it was on the floor. 

STAND IT IN THE SINK-NOT ON THE WORKTOP!

 

We would take it and park it anywhere - Tesco's, B&Q, what ever. Even easier overseas with free motorhome stopvers in many towns and villages - even major city centres

MMM, MABE NOT THAT HUMONGOUS??

 

Our garage contained two bikes, washing machine, two reclinging chairs, two sun loungers, masses of dog food, beer, upto 200 bottles of wine etc

BIKE IN CAR,WASHING MACHINE IN SITE BLOCK,CHAIRS IN VAN, BEER & WINE IN CAR

 

Cost to insure the motorhome with a pay out value of £102,000 was less than to insure the caravan! 

TAKE YOUR WORD FOR IT

 

We are away again this weekend so will report back. The concept or caravanning - especially with a Hobby with a decent payload appeals, but there's just a lot of faffing. It's may a reason why in winter, a lot of sites have more motorhomes on than caravans. 

AND AS A MH CAN ONLY MOVE WITH A LOT OF FAFFING-THATS WHY THEY NEED A BIKES,200 BOTTLES OF WINE AND A WASHING MACHINE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hi KK, Apologies for caps, but just stands out better, and good luck with your further experimenting!

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10 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

True, but caravans do still require servicing.

 

As for clutches well they don’t need replacing ever year or so do they? If they do them I am afraid is down to driving style! I have driven many many vehicles (most of them well used until a few years ago) of all shapes and sizes, for the best part of 50 years. I have only had to replace one clutch, and that was on a 100k plus miles Citroen BX where the diaphragm spring in the pressure plate failed. I have had Fiat based motorhomes that have clutches basically made out of cheese and never needed to renew them. 

One car I purchased at 30k knowing its history. Sold it at 175k and it was still on the original clutch so, like I said, clutch wear is directly related to driving style/ability. Police patrol cars usually did 100k plus on a single clutch. 

 

My reference to clutch replacement was merely symbolic. I could just as well have mentioned a blown head gasket or a seized gearbox or any other relatively expensive repair as examples of what could be encountered with a motor home but not with a caravan.

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All of which are indeed possible, but pretty unlikely. 

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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23 hours ago, KnausCol said:

We started 'mobile' holidaying by hiring RV's in America, Canada and Alaska. The vehicles were large and the countries likewise with facilities everywhere for them. Our holiday style also suited a MH in that we were touring and moving on every couple of days at least.

When circumstances dictated we needed to holiday closer to home (UK/Europe) we considered MH and caravan but our holidays were going to be based mainly in one place for a couple of weeks at a time. In the end we started with a small caravan because we already had a car capable of towing it. We liked caravanning but not bed making(!) so we soon upgraded to a twin axle fixed bed and have gone on to eventually replace with a new similar van.

MH and caravans each have their place and it really depends on your use and requirements as to which is best. We like space and our 8ft wide caravan with large awning gives us plenty. I would only consider a MH if it were sufficiently large and could tow a small car behind for local excursions but to get the equivalent space of my van would be extremely expensive!!

Interestingly my brother who until recently had a MH has just transferred to a large caravan because he was increasingly envious of the room afforded in my rig. To date he doesn't regret it.

:goodpost:

So long as our accommodation is totally private and self contained, overall I don't really have a preference as we've used tents, campers, caravans, motorhomes etc. What I do not like are hotels, B&Bs and guest houses - had enough of them when I was working - now retired so I have more control over where I stay.

I like the independence and so don't choose package holidays or cruises but we're all different and the world would be a much duller place if we all liked the same things.

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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