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Oily residue in pigtails


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Messing about in gas locker, so took bottle out. 
Left the pigtail hanging down and noticed an oily residue dripping out of the pigtail. 
Left it a few minutes, and got a puddle of about 1/4 teaspoon quantity. 
Now, if this was a couple of years old, this would not surprise me, but it’s a new van, and only used for five nights. 
I would expect to find some residue, after some time, but this seems excessive for such short usage. Anyone got any thoughts on this?
Think I might take to disconnecting and leaving it hanging down when not in use, so any residue can drain out. 

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Stainless steel is the way to go.  I have had mine for many years with never a drop!

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The oily residue is from the gas. The regulator should be sited higher than the hose, so that any liquid residue runs down back to the gas container. The rubber hose should be replaced by the date shown on it. The stainless steel type last indefinitely.

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Back in 2008 we bought a brand new Adria motorhome with a  Truma regulator fitted to the back of the gas locker, above the cylinder. On our second or third trip out, about a fortnight after handover the gas stopped due to the regulator being clogged with gunge.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

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Interesting this should come up. We have just been away for a few days and we had trouble with the gas getting through to the cooker. When I turned the cylinder (full) on the gauge (Gaslow) was reluctant to go completely green and when we lit the gas it soon went out. My immediate thought was the regulator. For some reason I decided to take the pigtail off and gave it a bit of a wiggle, put it back and the gas was fine for the rest of the trip. New pigtails me thinks, will go for stainless steel which I had in my previous motorhome and caravans without issue.

 

David

David - Milton Keynes

Bailey Alliance 66-2 Motorhome for holidays and a Kia Venga for home.

 

Caravan Travels

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16 hours ago, Ern said:

The oily residue is from the gas. The regulator should be sited higher than the hose, so that any liquid residue runs down back to the gas container. The rubber hose should be replaced by the date shown on it. The stainless steel type last indefinitely.

How can the liquid run back into  pressurised container?

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6 minutes ago, DottieD said:

How can the liquid run back into  pressurised container?

The hose is at the same pressure and liquid is heavier than gas so gravity will work, but only if the regulator is above the cylinder

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8 minutes ago, Ex-Gasman said:

The hose is at the same pressure and liquid is heavier than gas so gravity will work, but only if the regulator is above the cylinder

Thanks.

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27 minutes ago, DottieD said:

How can the liquid run back into  pressurised container?

Gravity. Woops! Just read the following posts.

Edited by Ern
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16 hours ago, Ern said:

The oily residue is from the gas. The regulator should be sited higher than the hose, so that any liquid residue runs down back to the gas container. The rubber hose should be replaced by the date shown on it. The stainless steel type last indefinitely.

The oily residue is indeed from the gas. As I recall 2 tankers full of contaminated gas were to blame, though this was denied at the time (& has yet to be admitted to) but later confirmed by an ex employee of that well-known bottle gas supplier. Having suffered this traumatic (there's a pun there if you can see it LOL) problem I did my own test using several brands of empty bottle upended overnight: the only ones that contained oil were calor.

25 minutes ago, Ex-Gasman said:

The hose is at the same pressure and liquid is heavier than gas so gravity will work, but only if the regulator is above the cylinder

This is very true but if oil is found it's preferable to disconnect the hose (as already suggested) to allow it a chance to drain out harmlessly. The problem is that the empty bottles are not cleaned out thoroughly, or perhaps frequently, enough.

15 hours ago, Steamdrivenandy said:

Back in 2008 we bought a brand new Adria motorhome with a  Truma regulator fitted to the back of the gas locker, above the cylinder. On our second or third trip out, about a fortnight after handover the gas stopped due to the regulator being clogged with gunge.

Was it really THAT long ago, how time flies! For some time the regulators themselves were blamed & the makers, quite responsibly, replace many at huge cost. Even they soon realised it was not their fault.

 

For those who (still?) try to blame the rubber hoses (I've never understood why), & there were many at the time, I will repeat my cure which TOTALLY eliminates the problem): use autogas which is of a superior make-up or at least use one of better quality.

Note that whilst SS hoses have a longer life they are also lined with rubber so this is very obviously not the cause!

Lets hope that the OP has used an old-stock bottle rather than, heaven forbid,  we have a repeat situation on our hands.

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4 minutes ago, micktheshed said:

I will repeat my cure which TOTALLY eliminates the problem): use autogas which is of a superior make-up or at least use one of better quality.

Incorrect, the compound that causes the formation of the waxy oily deposit is known as ' Heavy Ends ' or Residuals, is from the refining process and can and is in the gas to a lesser or greater degree.

 

There can be other contaminants from various sources such as from the transportation of the gas either by tanker or pipeline.

 

That the heavy ends block the vaporiser in a gas powered engine is well known problem, likewise the problem with regulators, burner jets and gas pipework in such as caravans, canal boats, burger vans etc.

 

It's just pot luck if and when it affects the above.

 

LPG: a complex character

The Good: 

Liquefied petroleum gas has become something of a “darling” alternative fuel in the last years. Why? It’s more cost effective than its cousins, gasoline and diesel, and much more environmentally friendly. In comparison to gasoline, the flammable mixture of hydrocarbons that make up LPG produce 50 percent less carbon monoxide, 35 percent less nitrogen oxides and have just half of the  lower ozone-forming potential. Furthermore, its price is less dependent on crude oil, meaning that LPG is more robust in the marketplace. LPG is wonderfully versatile, and can be used for heating, power generation, refrigeration, cooking and vehicles.

The Bad: 

LPG is prone to oily residues that accumulate to form troublesome deposits that corrode or plug fuel filters, pressure regulators, fuel mixers or control solenoids. It can become contaminated by oily residue in just about any part of the production and transportation lifecycle. Transport contamination alone can occur in shared pipelines, valves and trucks used for the distribution of other products. 

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51 minutes ago, micktheshed said:

Lets hope that the OP has used an old-stock bottle rather than, heaven forbid,  we have a repeat situation on our hands.

Sorry, I didn’t say, I use Safefill bottles. These are less than two years old, and have not been refilled (topped up)  more than three times, due to COVID preventing use. 
Also, I have used the same forecourt on each occasion I have obtained gas. 
What I did notice was that the pigtail is “of generous length”, (to enable use with either bottle in the locker). 
When I fitted/ connected the pigtail, it had a slight sag, or low point. 
I have now rotated the bottle so there is a continuous fall from regulator to bottle. I plan to monitor this, and check / drain deposits regularly 

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Advice amongst Safefill users is to make sure the top of your bottle is lower than your regulator.  Some people buy the shorter 7.5kg rather than the 10kg to avoid any issues, others have fitted inline filters.

 

sounds like it was the dip in your pigtail that might have been the problem

 

Edited by Aitch
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