Jump to content

Replacing AL-KO Corner Steady Travel Nut


Recommended Posts

I've a 1997 Bailey Hunter Lite, I noticed a rear corner steady wasn't winding properly. On inspection, the travel nut had broken. I've now got a shiny new travel nut, courtesy of eBay.

Having had a look online, fitting the travel nut seems easiest if the steady is removed first. It's held on by two bolts. The first came undone easy. The second isn't playing (the bolt is turning with the nut). I've got access to the bolt head, but it's a rather rusted dome-head: not immediately easy to prevent it turning.

a) has anyone replaced the steady travel nut without removing the steady? or

b) has anyone got any tips as to how to stop the bolt turning, to allow me to remove the stuck nut? I'd guess it's a case of trying to make a slot in either the head or the shaft of the bolt, then using a screwdriver?

Any advice/tips appreciated, thanks!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Jacobite said:

has anyone replaced the steady travel nut without removing the steady? or

 

Yes!   I did many years ago.    The travel nuts on my steadies were manufactured from nylon and one of them had stripped its thread.   The steadies were fixed to the floor with coach bolts with nuts that didn't want to loosen.   I managed to change the travel nuts without removal.   As I remember the threaded bar was held at the inside end with large washer and split pin.   Once that was out the threaded bar just turned out, leaving the nut held between the two bars by two large cross-headed screws.     Since one nylon nut had stripped, I bought a pair of brass replacements.   The spare must still be in the workshop.   As I remember,  there was more than one diameter size of threaded bar.

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, @Jaydug - I've spent three hours on the stuck coach bolt, and whilst I've got it moving, it's only a couple of turns (using a couple more nuts to 'lock' the bolt). I don't recall seeing a washer and split pin, but I'll take a look when I have my next struggle with it. Cheers!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Jacobite said:

Thanks, @Jaydug - I've spent three hours on the stuck coach bolt, and whilst I've got it moving, it's only a couple of turns (using a couple more nuts to 'lock' the bolt). I don't recall seeing a washer and split pin, but I'll take a look when I have my next struggle with it. Cheers!

I really don't see any benefit in removing the steady from the van.   Whether its on or off the van, the threaded rod has still got to be removed to enable the swap of the trunnion nuts. 

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Jaydug said:

I really don't see any benefit in removing the steady from the van.   Whether its on or off the van, the threaded rod has still got to be removed to enable the swap of the trunnion nuts. 

I think the benefit would be not working upside down with gunk falling on me, being able to degrease and re-lubricate the threaded bar on a nice workbench, and being able to see the mechanism more readily to take out the remnants of the old travel nut and put in the new. Whether that's all worth the effort of fighting with that pesky bolt, I don't know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, taking @Jaydug 's sensible looking advice, I think I've found the split pin - though I think it looks like a slotted spring pin? Any clues on removal? I think knocking it through could be tricky, given the lack of space each side?

 

Screenshot_20210605-113630_Photos.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a roll pin, some can be very hard so not a lot of fun drilling them out if they won't shift, also the split can grip the drill bit and break it !

 

A couple of days of dosing with Plusgas will help.

 

Ideally you need a roll pin punch just under the o/s dia of the pin, roll pin punches have a little pip on the end that sits inside the roll pin to prevent going off center and burring over edge of the pin, though an ordinary pin punch can be used with care.

 

Don't be tempted to give it a couple of cracks with a steel hammer on the end of the pin, it will most likely burr it over preventing it from passing through the hole, should be OK with a copper mallet though.

 

A bit of heat if done safely will also help.

 

Sometimes giving it a tap or two  alternately at each end can also help.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

After a second opinion from a more DIY minded mate, I'm giving up on unscrewing the offending bolt. So the plans are now:

a) get a set of roll pin punches and somehow, whilst working upside down with limited clearance around the pin, knock it out. Then replace the travel nut. And get the right size replacement of roll pin to reassemble it all. Anyone happen to know what the likely size is on a 1997 AL-KO chassis?

Or

b) get another friend with a cordless angle grinder to remove the rear steady bolt altogether, and replace it with a new one after replacing the travel nut and roll pin in the comfort of my garage.

I'll try a) first. Wish be luck :-) A split pin would have been so much easier...

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The roll pin will come out easy enough if it's done properly. As Silversurf said, you need a roll pin punch, or fettle (bench grinder) an ordinary punch to provide the correct form.  You also need someone to firmly hold a heavy hammer head behind the shaft so that the energy of the punch impact is not lost. If you get that in place and then carefully locate the punch, a single thump will usually break the bond and the pin will punch through fairly easily.

While I agree with Jaydug there is little point in removing the assembly from the caravan to replace a winder nut, if you really want to remove the seized coach bolt then simply cut the nut off and replace the coach bolt/nut. You are lucky to have access to the head inside the caravan.

Edited by Ern
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 01/06/2021 at 16:35, Jaydug said:

 

Yes!   I did many years ago.    The travel nuts on my steadies were manufactured from nylon and one of them had stripped its thread.   The steadies were fixed to the floor with coach bolts with nuts that didn't want to loosen.   I managed to change the travel nuts without removal.   As I remember the threaded bar was held at the inside end with large washer and split pin.   Once that was out the threaded bar just turned out, leaving the nut held between the two bars by two large cross-headed screws.     Since one nylon nut had stripped, I bought a pair of brass replacements.   The spare must still be in the workshop.   As I remember,  there was more than one diameter size of threaded bar.

Ditto, in 1998!  Nylon never was up to the job so brass is definitely the type to use .I bought a spare at the time, which I still have! It's price tag says £5.30, so expect it to be slightly (as in MUCH, MUCH) more now! There were indeed two sizes.

 

Though mine had a split pin, your wrapped pin can be removed by sawing off one end, applying loads of WD40 over several days, & then taping or even drilling out the remainder. But I strongly suggest replacing it with a split pin!

 

What a fun job LOL. ............Remember to keep the brass one(s) well greased!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, micktheshed said:

I bought a spare at the time, which I still have!

 

There's a lot of it about!:P    I too bought a pair and only used one of them.   This one must have sat in the garage for the past 35 years. 

010.jpg.a48137fc038f1b1f2d967bce422c8bfa.jpg

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your experience -appreciated. I've a set of roll pin punches on their way to me, with assorted replacement pins. I've read up on squeezing the roll pin slightly to aid insertion, once over for the old one out and the travel nut replaced.

There's not much room to work, but hopefully not too difficult a job. With my day-job workload, I think it'll be the jack as a stand-in steady for going away next weekend, however.

£12 for a single travel nut, I think I paid...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, got the coach bolt nut released, and have the steady off the 'van! Cleaned and ready for the new travel nut. Alas, I've got a roll pin punch set and replacement roll pins surplus to requirements.

Any advice gratefully received on how to spread the opening to get the travel nut into place... and choice of lubricant? Thanks.

20210621_180427.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Travel nut now in place. It's taken about 3 hours' work overall... Getting the steady off took most of the time. I was ready to give up, and was retightening the bolt using the lock nut method when I accidentally managed to loosen the seized nut and then get it off. I had tried cutting a slot in the coach bolt head (easily accessible in my case) but didn't have a sharp enough blade for my multitool to do so.

I had contemplated trying to put the travel nut on with the steady still in place, but getting the roll pin out in the limited clearance available, working upside down, would have been a real challenge.

Getting the new travel nut into place involved a lot of grunting, and bending back some quite solid metal. I'm sure there's a tool for this, but I don't have it.

Final step - I'll get replacement M8 nuts and bolts to reattach the steady tomorrow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

All sorted now? I'm just about to attempt this myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, tallcal said:

All sorted now? I'm just about to attempt this myself.

 

Yes, all fine and well. Hopefully you'll be able to undo the two bolts retaining the steady, and then take it off. That makes life much easier.

Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...