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Corner steady pads?


figbat
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We are awaiting the preparation and arrival of our first outfit.  I have done loads of research and have picked up on most fundamental things but I haven’t yet seen corner steady pads being mentioned - are they a thing?  Do you need them?  I guess it will depend on the surface you park on but is it worth having a set onboard or do sites just have them available?  Or do you use whatever bricks you can find lying about?

 

I’ve picked up a pair of wheel levelling ramps and I guess on an extreme slope you may need to put something under the jockey wheel?

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Corner steady pads spread the load of the steady which are quite narrow and stay on the caravan all the time once installed.

https://www.caravanstuff4u.co.uk/towing-levelling/2839-caravan-feet-pk-of-4-fiamma-jack-pads-8004815313623.html

 

They are certainly well worth getting and fitting.

Edited by Brecon
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You need to consider what types of sites you are going to use.

On level hard standing you don't need anything.

On level grass or loose gravel the ones that fasten to the steadies are fine or you can just carry around some wooden (not chipboard or mdf) offcuts.

On sloping sites such as many rally fields you need some kind of levelling blocks, either an assortment of different thicknesses of wooden blocks or you can get stackable plastic pads.

Most caravan accessory shops sell quite a few different types, you pays your money and takes your pick!

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Some form of ramp is used under the wheels to level the van side to side, jockey wheel is used for front to back levelling . The legs are used to steady the van once levelled. 

If you go to any uneven or sloping sites, you will find that you need something between the feet and ground, I have the Milenco “stack a jack” feet and two sets of the stacking blocks for the feet. 

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On soft ground it is advisable to place something under the corner steadies to spread the load. Whether you choose to permanently  fit 'feet' to the steadies or simply use a small timber square under each steady is a matter of personal preference. There are various designs of foot available from caravan dealerships. Most hang on the feet at a slight angle with the higher edge facing towards the caravan front. This is intended to minimise their catching on the ground when the caravan is moved forwards, particularly when fitted to the rear feet steadies. The attachment rod is plastic and intended to break rather than cause damage to the corner steady if a foot catches the ground.

Caravan Corner Steady Feet.jpg 

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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Our van (a year old when we bought it as approved used) came with Milenco ones like bottom right in Gordons pic above and stay fitted permanently.

Also have interlocking plastic blocks / pads to put under them if there’s a bigger dip in the ground.

For sloping pitches, it’s levelling ramps.

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Hi,

fwiw ...

We have type 5 from above pics - 3 rd set in 10 years after various incidents & losses.

Pads are normally retro fitted to most Touring Units to cope with the multi pitch scenarios.

If you strike lucky you'll get a fairly level sideways pitch with just easy front to rear Jockey wheel to adjust. If choice of pitches we will usually reject a badly sloping one. 

Tip. Practice using your spirit level !

Minor sideways slopes on gravel I may just scrape by foot a small hollow for a wheel to drop into or its ramping time (it takes practice & found tricky by many). We will accept a minor sideways slope (sink & shower draining issues maybe) but do prefer to set up a slight nose down at front as we sleep head to rear panel. If you sleep sideways consider which is higher side prior.

Rarely needed extra under pads or Jockey wheel on most sites.

Tip. Practice adjusting Jockey wheel on the master clamp (as well as just the winding handle) if chance - needs the steadies down first.

Worry & panic not, just takes a bit of practice & prior thinking.

M

 

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there are a lot of things on you tube about how to level a caravan . Sometimes it only needs a couple of inches so if on a gravel hard stand you can move some gravel out of the way, remembering to leave it how you found it. I also find that chocks are a necessity as well.

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Wow, thanks all!  Until the outfit arrives I can't be sure if it has anything fitted already, but I don't recall noting anything during our purchase viewing.

 

I remember from caravanning with my parents as a kid in the early 80s they carried some plastic squares with them for the steadies (funnily enough the thought came to me as I contemplated the plastic 'puck' I carry for my motorcycle sidestand).  I never remember the wheels being levelled but then we didn't really have any level-sensitive equipment onboard (or much equipment at all, in truth!).

 

From the response above it seems to be as I figured it would be in terms of levelling and steadying.  We're likely to use, let's say the more 'premium' sites with services, although we're not especially bound to hardstanding.

 

Some good tips above though. :Thankyou:

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17 hours ago, figbat said:

I’ve picked up a pair of wheel levelling ramps and I guess on an extreme slope you may need to put something under the jockey wheel?

It is strange that they usually sell ramps in pairs.  You normally just need one to raise the wheel on the downhill side and get the caravan laterally level.

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We use wooden blocks. On non level pitches you often find that the steadies aren't long enough or right at the end of their extension so you need something chunky under them. Also useful for parking a wheel on, though we normally use the plastic ramps for this purpose.

 

I have heard of people making lightweight blocks from Kingspan insulation faced with plywood.  

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We have used mostly CMC and C&CC sites and the levelling ramps have hardly been used. As Joanie noted, often a bit of gravel can be moved around under the wheels on hard standing to get the sides level enough. Plastic pads similar to the 5th ones in Gordon's post have served us well on the steadies.

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It has always slightly amused me when caravans come equipped only with the standard basic corner steadies the feet of which have a very small surface area and are useless on anything but very firm ground. Nearly all owners of such vans subsequently purchase additional corner pads to increase the footprint or carry bits of wood to achieve the same. Why are not all vans fitted with decent corner steadies in the first place? Oh yes the manufacturers can save a few quid. Only it appears if you are forking out for an expensive van are you likely to get 'big foot' steadies that are up to the job.

So to answer the OP's question - if the van comes only with small standard 'feet', yes I would recommend investing in some larger pads that you can permanently attach - saves faffing around with bits of wood!

Life is not a rehearsal . . .:)

Porsche Cayenne S Diesel & Knaus StarClass 695. Previously Audi S4 Avant & Elddis Super Sirocco

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We have the Milenco Stacka Feet attached to the corner steadies and we also have the Stacka Pads which slot underneath when on more sloping ground. 
 

61F0291C-2575-4289-8EDE-42283F06118E.jpeg

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Get rid of the levelling ramps, why park the caravan on the slope? I use 3 or 4 bits on usb board to level the van.

Easier to make fine adjustments for aligning the AL-KO wheel lock 

If on very soft ground I will put a board under each wheel to stop it sinking into the ground.

 

macafee2

 

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1 hour ago, DACS said:

It is strange that they usually sell ramps in pairs.  You normally just need one to raise the wheel on the downhill side and get the caravan laterally level.

I wondered similar but did think that on a pitch that slopes down from the nose you could use one either side as a wheel chock.

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it seems ridiculous that we used to have  just a few blocks of wood and now we have the feet, chocks,  ramps, grip mats and stacka jacks, where will it end :o

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26 minutes ago, macafee2 said:

why park the caravan on the slope?

 

 

I find that flat boards (at least ones that are thick enough to make much difference, height wise) are quite hard to manoeuvre the van on to. 

 

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We use a length of decking board, the thicker and wider the better, cut into squares to place under the feet and a length of about 30 inches to go under the wheel to be raised, bevel off one end to allow the wheel to rise onto it, and fix a block of 3x2 at the other end to bring the wheel up against. We also cut a spare length about 20 inches long with a bevel on it so you can add it to previous length to raise the wheel higher than the first board, if the site is sloping more than that side to side it's time to move to a different pitch.

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forty years ago a trip to the wreckers and four old fashioned car hubcaps served well under the steadies. Filled with water they kept the ants at bay.

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3 hours ago, Scarab said:

 

I find that flat boards (at least ones that are thick enough to make much difference, height wise) are quite hard to manoeuvre the van on to. 

 

chamfer the end to make it easier to get the van to drive up, make the second board a bit shorter and continue the chamfer to the second board etc etc

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4 hours ago, KnausCol said:

It has always slightly amused me when caravans come equipped only with the standard basic corner steadies the feet of which have a very small surface area and are useless on anything but very firm ground. 

So to answer the OP's question - if the van comes only with small standard 'feet', yes I would recommend investing in some larger pads that you can permanently attach - saves faffing around with bits of wood!

Al-Ko can supply a caravan chassis with larger feet but as with most things in life, there is a cost penalty that tends not to be something that caravan manufacturers choose to pay.

image.png

For anybody interested these corner steadies are handed under the part numbers below.

ALKO Part no 205 713 Left Hand

ALKO Part no 205 714 Right Hand

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan and Motorhome Talk.

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I always use plastic steady pads.  If you catch the steady when towing (we did when leaving the secure site), you can catch the pad, and plastic will break off without damaging the steady itself (this sometimes doesn't work if its a really steep drop), a metal pad could rip your steady off or really damage it.

 

Someone mentioned using chocks.  I used chocks.  One side in front of the wheel, and the other side have the chock behind the wheel.  I know some people use the handbrakes.  But I do prefer chocks

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11 hours ago, macafee2 said:

chamfer the end to make it easier to get the van to drive up, make the second board a bit shorter and continue the chamfer to the second board etc etc

 

Kind of like....a ramp! 

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1 hour ago, Scarab said:

 

Kind of like....a ramp! 

yes but only at the end of the wood to make it easier for the caravan to get onto the wood.  A ramp is often sloped its whole length. I want a flat surface for the wheel to stand on.

 

macafee2

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